ARC State Program Managers – Applicant Details

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APPLICANT

Will Bright Foundation

Total Qualifying Score: 6
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $100,000 to $250,000 – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Will Bright Foundation
Fayette, Fayette County, Alabama 35555
205-862-9086
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Fayette
State (ARC Region) Alabama


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Breaking the barrier to recovery from addiction by bridging the gap between the bubble of recovery and taking that next step, through awareness, education and the provision of transitional living.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Through the Will Bright Foundation’s transitional living facility, Restoration Springs, we align with several of ARC five goals.  First, we provide housing, food, workforce readiness training and job placement.  Through our program, we have seen that the increase in education, knowledge, skills and health of residents to work and succeed in Fayette, Alabama has allowed our residents to stretch their sobriety while being an active member of society.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $150,000/$150.,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $162,849 / $118,778

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $150,000 / $150.,000

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($8,600)
Received From: PPP   Date Received: June, 2020
For What Purpose(s): payroll, utilitilies

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Due to COVID we have had to cancel fund raising events which help us maintain our budget.  

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
funding
employees
safety for residents from COVID

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

I believe my participation in this program will help with any future issues stemming from COVID or any other unforeseen issue in the future.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 B: 5-Week Course (Mar. 1, 2021-April 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Lisa Bright, CEO

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

CAO of Scioto County

Total Qualifying Score: 4
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

CAO of Scioto County
Portsmouth, Scioto County, Ohio 45662
740-352-8275
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Scioto
State (ARC Region) Ohio


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

CAO of Scioto County strives to develop and implement strategies which appropriately mix advocacy, education and direct provision of services through agency administered programs and coordination of CAO  activities with those of all other institutions, agencies and groups serving those in need.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

All of the above

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 125/59 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 114/64 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $20,000,000/$19,000,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: October-September

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $19,000,000 / $18,500,000

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $20,000,000 / $19,000,000

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($500,000)
Received From: Ohio Developmental Services Agency, Village of New Boston, City of Portsmouth   Date Received: OHio Department of Services Agency, Village of New Boston, City of Portsmouth
For What Purpose(s): Community Services Block Grant, Emergency Services, Senior Meals

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

COVID has dramatically reduced in-office traffic by customers of all of our services,  Head Start has decreased children in classrooms

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Customer interaction and continuation of safely serving customers in buildings
Anxiety of staff
Continuing to follow. CDC guidelines

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Hope to learn how others are coping with the issues above


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Mission & Operations

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 B: 5-Week Course (Mar. 1, 2021-April 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Steve Sturgill Sturgill, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

County of Otsego Industrial Development Agency

Total Qualifying Score: 8
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Other – 0
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

County of Otsego Industrial Development Agency
Oneonta, Otsego County, New York 13820
607-267-4010
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Otsego
State (ARC Region) New York


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Assist in the enhancement and diversity of the economy of the County of Otsego (the “County”) by acting in support of projects in the County that create and/or retain jobs and/or promote private sector investment utilizing the statutory powers of the Agency as set forth under the provisions of the laws of the State of New York.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Our Agency works with small business micro-enterprise businesses, entrepreneurial and medium sized businesses to expand and employ new workers.  In addition, we are currently extending water, sewer and natural gas to newly planned business parks.  We also work with the Small Business Development Center and the Center for Agriculture, Development and Entrepreneurism to provide training to small businesses.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: NYS Public Benefit Corporation   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $261,958/$455,170

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $358,257 / $513,809

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $261,958 / $455,170

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Some of our tenants for manufacturing facilities we own have closed their operations.  In addition, one of our  office tenants has moved out.  NYS funding (i.e. grants) have been put on hold.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Loss of operating revenue.
Loss of sale of property in our business parks.
Loss of NYS grant programs needed for development projects.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Not sure it can help.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Jody Zakrevsky, CEO

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

The Appalachian Center for the Arts

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: Yes – 0
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

The Appalachian Center for the Arts
Pikeville, Pike County, Kentucky 41501
606-262-4004
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Pike
State (ARC Region) Kentucky


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

 

Mission Statement

We want Pikeville to be a regional arts hub by presenting and cultivating the stories of our town, our region, and our world. The Community of Pikeville is alive with art, music, and ideas. By nurturing creativity and embracing innovation, we strengthen ALL families.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

The Appalachian Center for the Arts addresses strengthening Appalachia’s community and economic development potential by leveraging the Region’s cultural heritage assets. The App houses a gallery space which will present the work of local artists and artisans. Our arts education department introduces our young citizens  to performing and visual arts from the stories of Appalachia to the music of Broadway to the words of Shakespeare. In a time when the arts are the first to fall under the axe of budgetary cuts, The App – as it’s known – provides the highest quality of arts education and arts presentation throughout Southeast Kentucky and the entire Central Appalachian region. 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: Yes

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 5/5 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 5/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $50,000/$200,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $286,000 / $386,000

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $50,000 / $200,000

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Our inability to present and produce artistic content has devastated our organizations. We have continued to teach and find socially distant ways of performing. We take our position as caretakers of a public trust. In that capacity, we will do our utmost to keep bringing the arts to our community. And during this time of pandemic, we feel it is more important than ever.  

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
How to maintain our staff
How to continue to present arts and arts education to our citizens
How to continue building the cross-sector and regional arts partnerships we’ve been working on

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Any training which can assist us in resolving any of the issues above will be greatly helpful.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? Yes

List of Organizations in Proposed Cohort:

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Erick Buckley, Director of Education and Outreach

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Live Healthy Appalachia

Total Qualifying Score: 6
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $100,000 to $250,000 – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Live Healthy Appalachia
Athens, Athens County, Ohio 45701
740-856-6100
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Athens
State (ARC Region) Ohio


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

To promote healthy eating and active living through educational opportunities and community partnerships. 

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Live Healthy Appalachia aligns with goal #2. Since 2010, we have been building upon the unique assets of Appalachia to reverse negative trends in health by empowering individuals to lead healthier lives. We believe that healthy lifestyles can & should be accessible to all people, regardless of socioeconomic status or ability. Through all these years our purpose still remains the same: to make healthy choices accessible for everyone in our region.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 3/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 3/1 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $222,319/$222,148

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $215,637 / $240,615

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $222,319 / $222,148

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($28,935)
Received From: Hocking Valley Bank   Date Received: 4/17/2020
For What Purpose(s): Salaries

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

The COVID pandemic has created many challenges for our organization. All of our programs are in person. We cook with people, educate people, and interact with the community on a daily basis. All of our events and fundraisers are in person. We essentially had to wipe our calendar clean and start fresh. We have moved some of our programming to a virtual format and are trying new events and fundraisers–all socially distanced and/or online. We’re taking this time to take our biggest children’s program, Live Healthy Kids, to a video format. This will take at least 2 years to complete. Our biggest adult education program, the Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP), has been very successful using a virtual format and we are currently running 2 cohorts of this class and plan to focus most of our energy here since it is popular and it generates revenue for our organization.  

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Meeting my budget numbers
Creating fundraisers that fulfill our mission and generate revenue
How to generate donor and corporate support

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

I hope to finish the program with a plan for long-term financial sustainability and fundraising ideas. 


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Heidi Fischer, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Garrard Arts

Total Qualifying Score: 3
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : No (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Garrard Arts
Lancaster, Garrard County, Kentucky 40444
859-948-6988
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Garrard
State (ARC Region) Kentucky


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Awareness of Arts

Reaching artists with opportunities

Teaching visual, performing, literary, and cultural arts

Serving the community in artistic capacity

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

We offer sale opportunities both in our gift shop and through online venues to our artists enabling them to supplement their incomes.  Currently we have 50 plus artists exhibiting for sale in our gift shop.  Beyond  providing a venue for unique shopping  we also  offer instruction to help enrich the  skills of the artist so that they may improve their craft.  Our building is on the National Historic Registry we  serve as the local tourist information center.   In conjunction with local businesses and our chamber of commerce we work to promote the uniqueness of our community.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 0/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 0/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $20700/$19752

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $14620 / $11703

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $20700 / $19752

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($11000)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($6000)
Received From: US Small Business Administration   Date Received: 6/2020
For What Purpose(s): operating funds

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Because of the initial closing we were forced to close our gift shop, unable to hold in person classes and some artists were forced to leave their studios due to person financial situation. all of these are income sources to maintain and operate the art center.  Since reopening we have limited foot traffic in our gift shop and many customers are reluctant to go into stores and our attempts at virtual marketing have had minimal results.  We still have 2 vacant artists studios which we have been unable to rent due to the current economic situation.   paid classes are limited due to Covid concerns. during this time our utilities, maintenance , insurance and mortgage expenses remain constant, causing a significant deficit in cash flow.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Financial
Staffing
Marketing

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

I want to learn a better way to market our center.  To help us better serve the community and remain financially stable for continued growth.

We purchase our building only a short  year ago and had our grand opening in October 2019.  We were on a growth path which has been totally derailed by the Covid pandemic.  We are struggling to get back on track so as to better serve those we are committed to.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Bobbie Gayle Lewis Lewis, Center Dirrector

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Olive Hill Community Economic Development Corporation, Inc

Total Qualifying Score: 6
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $100,000 to $250,000 – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Olive Hill Community Economic Development Corporation, Inc
Morganton, Burker County, North Carolina 28655
828-475-4620
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Burker
State (ARC Region) North Carolina


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

To positively impact the economic environment of area residents with asset building opportunities to achieve financial stability.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

• OHCEDC offers business development/entrepreneurial services to start-up and existing small businesses
• Provide education, knowledge and skill building opportunities through:

1. Homebuyer Education, counseling and community partners loan pool mortgage program reducing the cost of the mortgage by 20% in most cases.
2. OHCEDC empowers residents to overcome situational barriers and to gain financial stability and independence. Financial Life Skills – money management, investing, savings etc.
3. Workforce Development – Offering asset-building and educational opportunities for individuals and families challenged skilled needed to secure higher paying stable employment. The program prepares people without college degrees for jobs with promising career paths.
4. Providing tools, including technical and financial assistance and skills training, to local entrepreneurs to start and grow small businesses.
5. Housing Development – for 2021, OHCEDC is joint venturing with a local LLC to purchase, renovate and sell home to low-income households. Applicants are required to attend the 8 hour Homebuyer Education class in preparation to purchase home. Must also complete the 8 hour financial literacy training

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/1 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $175,000/$95,300

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $148,000 / $95,000

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $175,000 / $95,300

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($73,630)
Received From: Community Foundation of Burke County; EIDL; Mtn Bizworks; SBA   Date Received: 04/16/20, 05/08/20, 05/11/20, 05/22/20
For What Purpose(s): resources needed to maintain payroll, hire back employees laid off employees, and cover applicable overhead

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Reduced local public fundraising plans; increased the number of people needing resources to pay rent & mortgages requiring additional counseling time;

Created the need for more disaster related counseling and other services as people adapted to the impact on their households;

Need for additional resources for staff to work from home

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Resource development – maintaining funds needed to operate organization at full capacity
Finding the technical assistance to implement the US Treasury Community Development Entity (CDE) Opportunity Zone program
Providing value adding services to residents

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

September 2019, OHCEDC received certification from the US Department of Treasury to be a (CDE) Community Development Entity for opportunity zones in Burke & Caldwell counties.  This designation did not come with instructions.  At this point, we have not found a training source to provide technical assistance on how to implement this project.  This training would connect OHCEDC to the proper sources and help with strategic planning empowering us to launch this program to the benefit of residents needed affordable housing, starting businesses and maybe some community facilities.

Participation in this training will help us address financial stability issues – OHCEDC is a minority led organization that historically has been an underfunded organizations whose primary purpose is serving Black, indigenous and communities of color, and whose leadership is  representative of the communities we serve.  It is anticipated that this training will assist with identifying federal and state funding aligning with our mission and tips on how to submit a successful grant application.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Short-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Beverly Carlton, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Habitat for Humanity of the Tri-State, Inc.

Total Qualifying Score: 8
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Habitat for Humanity of the Tri-State, Inc.
Huntington, Cabell County, West Virginia 25701
304-523-4822
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Cabell
State (ARC Region) West Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Seeking to put God’s love into action, Habitat for Humanity of the Tri-State brings people together to build homes, community and hope.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Goals #2 and #5:

For the past 10 years, Habitat for Humanity of the Tri-State (HFHTS) has worked with Cabell County Career Technology Center (WV) to provide on-site job training opportunities for high school students and adults pursuing vocational training in the trades classes (HVAC, plumbing, electrical, and carpentry).  Since September 2014, HFHTS has partnered with Collins Career Technical Center (Lawrence County, OH) for the same type of on-site job training opportunities.  Through these two partnerships, HFHTS has been able to continue to improve the quality of life in and help revitalize our communities by providing home ownership opportunities for qualifying individuals and families. These on-site opportunities have provided an educational environment where the students are allowed to apply their classroom learning at working residential construction sites.  In 2014, due much in part to our partnership with Collins Career Technical Center, HFHTS was able to construct two of our Veteran Cottages as the start of an eventual 11 house Veteran Cottage “village”.  We broke ground on September 11, 2014 and dedicated the two completed houses on November 11, 2014 (from empty lot to completed house).  Also, since November 2010, every new house constructed by HFHTS is USEPA Energy Star Certified.  The students from both vocational institutions have received training on energy efficient building techniques  and technologies that can be applied to their future vocation. 

Residing in a safe, decent, affordable and energy efficient home is as important now as it ever has been.  Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, people are spending more and more time inside their homes by remote working, virtual classrooms for children and social distancing from large crowds.  Affordable housing, a home that the owner is paying at or less than 30% of their monthly income for, contributes to the economic vitality of a community by allowing families to have more disposable income to spend locally, invest in saving for the future and invest in their children’s education (college or vocational training).  Due to having a secure home environment, our homeowners are able to pursue educational opportunities and certificate training courses that allow them to secure higher paying jobs.  Many of our homeowners are able to purchase their first vehicle so they do not have to rely on public transportation to get to and from work, school, etc.

During the past 30 years of our existence, HFHTS has been able to improve the living conditions of over 300 individuals, make an investment of over $25 million in the communities we work in, grow from 6 employees in 2006 to 16 currently, begin a house construction program that specifically addresses the housing needs of formerly homeless Veterans in our community and provide on-site training opportunities to numerous high school students and adults in vocational training programs in Cabell County, WV and Lawrence County, OH. Finally, as of November 22, 2019, HFHTS operates in a service area that includes Boyd and Greenup counties in Kentucky, Lawrence and Scioto counties in Ohio, and Cabell and Wayne counties in West Virginia. As we begin to grow into our new service area, we will deepen our partnerships with the vocational schools in all 6 of the counties that comprise our geographic service area.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 13/3 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 13/3 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $2064700/$1915415

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $1005403 / $1027859

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $2064700 / $1915415

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($48462)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($276290)
Received From: US Small Business Administration (Payroll Protection Program and Emergency Disaster Injury Loan)   Date Received: May 2020
For What Purpose(s): Payroll, health insurance for currently enrolled empolyees, utilities

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Since March 18, 2020, HFHTS has had to cancel or postpone to a later date 5 fundraising events. Sales in our Habitat ReStore are down by 30% from the same period last year (largely due to being shutdown from March 18 to May 31). Many funders and donors are focusing on immediate COVID-19 relief and do not view affordable housing as “critical” at this time. Outside of our regular “key” volunteers and future homeowners, we are not hosting any volunteers (casual, corporate, churches, civic groups, etc.).  Our house production is significantly behind the same period last year (zero house dedications since December 2020). Expenses for cleaning/sanitizing supplies and PPE have increased 30% from the same period last year. 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
COVID-19 and its impact on our ability to serve individuals/families in the counties we serve
Keeping all of the bills paid and staff employed without layoffs or furloughs
Having the capacity to provide our services to a geographic area of nearly 2400 square miles and a greater than 20% poverty rate

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Affordable housing is critical for our most vulnerable populations. The individuals/families we serve through our home ownership and repair programs must have an affordable housing option available to them. In spite of COVID-19, HFHTS has expanded our service area from 2 Appalachian counties in 2 states to 6 Appalachian counties in 3 states. Our desire to serve more individuals/families who need a better housing situation has never been stronger. By being accepted into a cohort of the Appalachia Nonprofit Resource Center and working with similar organizations on our area, HFHTS will be better equipped to serve more individuals/families, find additional resources to sustain and expand our operations and create the capacity to simply do more to help our communities thrive (affordable housing and vocational training opportunities).


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: David Michael, Executive Director/CEO

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

LIFE VILLAGE INC

Total Qualifying Score: 4
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : No (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves:
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

LIFE VILLAGE INC
Boone, Watauga County, North Carolina 28607
336-877-9286
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Watauga
State (ARC Region) North Carolina


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

To meet the ongoing residential needs of adults with autism and related challenges.  To serve as a community resource for people of different abilities and their families by providing diverse social and recreational programming, including but not limited to summer programs, life skills, and vocational training, adaptive sports, support groups and workshops in coordination with other agencies that work with this population.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Our organization has a solid alignment with goal: (5. Build the capacity and skills of current and next-generation leaders and organizations to innovate, collaborate, and advance community and economic development.)

Residents of LIFE House I have been and LIFE House II will be selected by the LIFE Team with the help of our partners: Watauga Opportunities, Summit Support Services and the faculty at Appalachian State in the Scholars with Diverse Abilities Program, SDAP.  We have also developed a survey that is posted on our website and distributed around the special needs community that filters interested participants to find the most appropriate candidates.  

The Life House program is carried out by support staff from LIFE Village, community members trained to work with this population, and natural supports in the neighborhood (unpaid support like friends and neighbors).  The LIFE Village team partners with Scholars with Diverse Abilities Program (SDAP) at Appalachian State University to find applicants who are interested in this opportunity after they graduate. 

SDAP, Scholars with Diverse Abilities, is a 2-year program at ASU for adults with Neurodiverse needs.  They have approximately a dozen students this year in the program. Most live on campus, experience being independent, but end up back home living with family after graduation due to the lack of affordable housing and support. We are partnering with SDAP to offer LIFE House as transitional housing.

LIFE Village Inc. addresses an unmet need in the High Country.  In Watauga County alone, 7.8% of the population has a disability.  If this statistic holds of the roughly 15,000 residents of Boone, that is 1,170 persons or 1 in 12.  https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/wataugacountynorthcarolina.  According to autismspeaks.org, approximately 2% of the population has autism.  That potentially means that of the 15,000 residents of Boone, 300 could be on the autism spectrum or 1 in 50.

There is no other organization within 100 miles of Watauga County offering similar services. 

Goals*

To foster quality of life and well-being while providing safety, inclusion into the larger community of Boone and the High Country and continuity of care for residents throughout their lives.

To provide a meaningful, satisfying and dignified life with access to opportunities in the larger community of Boone and the High Country whereby full and active participation is achieved.

To ensure that residents contribute to all aspects of life to the fullest extent of their desire and ability.

To create an opportunity for students in the surrounding colleges and universities to volunteer, intern and work to gain knowledge and skills in working with these exceptional individuals.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 0/1 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $85,000/$100,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $67, 374 / $37, 972

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $85,000 / $100,000

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($6340)
Received From: Wells Fargo Bank (PPP)   Date Received: 07/01/2020
For What Purpose(s): Payroll Protection

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

 

We have canceled scheduled fundraising for the remainder of 2020.  This includes our annual golf tournament and year-end dinner which we anticipated would have each raised $25,000 respectively.  In addition, all share nights and special events for fundraising have been canceled as well as partner events with Appalachian State University.

We have also postponed the placement of clients in our LIFE House program until recently. This was because we wanted to make sure we could ensure their safety and that we could provide an essential COVID-19 sensitive supported housing and programming.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Continuing to Safeguard our Clients and adapt our programming and support model.
Seeking creative solutions to funding and program support for sustainability.
Developing collaborative efforts and innovative approaches to networking and partnership.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Participation in the cohort instruction program will assist us in our efforts to continue to navigate the pandemic climate and continue in our efforts to support our clients with programming and housing.

Our primary goal is to solidify a sustainable model for housing.  Participation will also allow us to seek solutions to sustainability while utilizing not only a larger view of financial support but also the natural local supports, collaborations, and partnerships.  We have had tremendous success in our partnerships, and enhancing efforts and developing a stronger and more effective network, will ensure a sustainable future.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Mark Mangum, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Discover Life in America

Total Qualifying Score: 6
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $100,000 to $250,000 – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Discover Life in America
Gatlinburg, Sevier County, Tennessee 37738
865-250-1207
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Sevier
State (ARC Region) Tennessee


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Discovering, understanding, and conserving biological diversity

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

We are based in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, but we have a regional approach to research, education and conservation to increase the knowledge and understanding and protection of the great resources of the region, especially the biological resources, which match well with goals 2 and 4.  One of our aspirations is to train and inspire the next generation of scientists, which fits well with goal 5.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $179800/$187840

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $209613 / $180365

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $179800 / $187840

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($24000)
Received From: First Horizon Bank   Date Received: April 2020
For What Purpose(s): Payroll Protection -PPP

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

We were unable to proceed with our work for several weeks.

We had to cancel or postpone several projects/events related to fundraising and contracts.

With many of our funding sources (donors, small businesses, etc) especially negatively impacted by COVID-19 we are having a hard time raising the money we need to do our work.

We expect this to be a longer term funding problem.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Funding
Being able to accomplish our work
Long term problems created by the pandemic

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

We hope this would help us re-evaluate our fundraising, and potentially open up new areas and ideas for funding sources.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Todd Witcher Witcher, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Venango County Association for the Blind

Total Qualifying Score: 4
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: Yes – 0
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $100,000 to $250,000 – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Venango County Association for the Blind
Seneca, Venango County, Pennsylvania 16346
814-676-1876
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Venango
State (ARC Region) Pennsylvania


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

To serve the blind and visually impaired and prevent unnecessary blindness.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

The Venango County Association for the Blind is focused on increasing the education, knowledge, skills, and health of blind and visually impaired consumers in the Pennsylvania counties of: Venango, Clarion and Forest. We provide assistance with vital skills which enables our clients to increase their ability to live independent lives outside of care homes and nursing homes.  We provide sighted guide and specialized transportation for our clients so that they have the necessary assistance to meet their medical and health needs and ensure their ability to procure and prepare healthy foods that supports their individual needs. We provide access to technology that increases independence, and we make appropriate referrals to other social service agencies that provide services needed that we cannot.  

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: Yes

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 3/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 3/2 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $178,184/$181,072

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $186,092 / $183,039

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $178,184 / $181,072

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($1,473,501.81)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s): Operational assistance; however, we were just notified of our funding and do not know how much it is. The max available per agency was supposed to be $5,000.

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

COVID-19 impacted our Agency first and foremost in the area of preventative services.  Our ability to provide vision screenings to preschools and schools in our three county service area was stopped.  We average over 800 screenings per year during this time of year and we only captured 150.  We also were unable to run our transportation services in the same manner; therefore, our service provision in this area declined as well.  We had to discontinue our support groups and education groups due to restrictions regarding congregating, which impacted our reach to our clients in this area.  Our computers had to be upgraded system wise and new software to allow remote work was necessary and resulted in unplanned expenses as well as the modifications to our vehicles to allow transport cost the agency unplanned expenses as well. 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Our state funding is in questionable status for this service year. We still do not know what funding we will receive after the elections in November.
How to continue providing needed services for our clients under the restrictions at whatever phase we are in, green, yellow or red.
How to fund raise in the current COVID climate.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

I believe so based on the description of the program.  Any and all resources available provides the opportunity to learn, and grow. 


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Krysta Carson, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Appalachian RC&D Council

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Appalachian RC&D Council
Johnson City, Washington County, Tennessee 37604
423-467-0560
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Washington
State (ARC Region) Tennessee


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

To conserve natural resources and improve rural economies through community leadership and enhanced educational opportunities.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

With our mission statement as our guide, Appalachian RC&D Council (ARCD) produces robust programming that aligns with the ARC’s goals number 1, 2, 4 and 5.  ARCD has developed programs around food, agriculture, and conservation of the region’s natural resources.

ARCD’s Field school is a training course for beginning farmers and ranchers that offers two sections: Winter Business Intensive is a nine-session business and marketing course where participants are trained in aspects of what is needed to be successful including business models, regulations, markets and marketing, budget development, staffing and time considerations, etc.  This section was accredited two years ago by the TN Department of Agriculture for participants to receive education credits toward state cost-share programs.  Summer Field School is a summer filled with on-site and hands-on workshop opportunities for beginning and seasoned farmers.  Sessions include important topics such as soil and water conservation, rotational grazing, irrigation installation, beekeeping, etc.  Both the Winter and Summer Field Schools are perennially evaluated to ensure that topics are relevant and timely for the participants.  Field School will begin its sixth season of classes in November 2020.

With land access as one of the greatest challenges for beginning farmers, ARCD developed and maintains a database that matches landowners with landseekers.  TN Farm Link was developed to match those who want to sell, lease, or need management of farmlands with those who want to buy, rent, or manage farmlands.  This program has created some wonderful success stories and it serves the entire state of TN. 

Farm Fresh Appalachia is a Farmers Market Promotion Project funded by the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service.  This program has provided opportunity for ARCD to assist regional farmers markets in marketing and promotion by providing the markets with materials and with education on state regulations, as well as market promotion so that the markets have greater sustainability.  This project also supports SNAP outreach in the region by partnering with other organizations to inform SNAP recipients of markets that accept SNAP benefits and which markets have opportunity for doubling or increasing SNAP dollar values.  SNAP-ready markets provide healthy nutritional options while supporting the region’s small to mid-size farms who sell at farmers markets.  In conjunction with the Farm Fresh Appalachia program, ARCD hosts annual CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) fairs for participants to sign up for CSAs from local farms, and also coordinates and hosts an annual Farm Tour of regional farms.  ARCD’s Farm Fresh Appalachia Program Director is also on the board of directors for the TN Association of Farmers Markets and works to improve opportunities for farmers markets statewide.

ARCD’s Build It Up (BIU) program began in 2012 and continues to be an extremely popular and beneficial program.  BIU provides seeds, plant starts, tilling service, hand tools, fertilizer and pest-control, season extension supplies, and education on how to organically grow fruits and vegetables in your own backyard.  Education is also provided on how to harvest, cook, and preserve fruits and vegetables.  This program is primarily targets low-income families, but we have recently added a small market gardener component.  We have seen a significant increase in interest with this program along with Field School and TN Farm Link since the COVID pandemic.

ARCD is also committed to developing next-generation leaders.  In 2020 ARCD began an AmeriCorps program that focuses on food and agriculture with Healthy Futures outcomes.  ARCD places AmeriCorps Service Members at host sites within the state of TN for direct service to their communities. ARCD also supports and hosts Environthon which is a regional, state, and national competition for high school students.  Envirothon team participants compete in five conservation categories: soils, aquatics, forestry, wildlife, and a current-event topic.  ARCD hosts the regional competition and accompanies the winning team to the state competition.  ARCD ensures that the regional competition is administered by industry leaders who spend time with the participants at the competition to talk about professional work in the various fields and answer questions.  ARCD is also part of the Washington County Ag Partnership which hosts FFA leadership tours where students are able to tour farms and agricultural businesses/organizations to better understand the opportunities that are available and spend Q&A time with current professionals. 

ARCD programming also includes partnership with TN Division of Forestry to implement statewide wildfire mitigation projects, the National Association of RC&D Councils to deliver additional beginning farmer training and youth leadership nationwide, and with Grow Appalachia to provide Technical Assistance to farmers.  Organizational and business partnerships/collaborations are diverse and numerous and include many other regional organizations such as the First TN Development District, Northeast TN Regional Economic Partnership, and Northeast TN Tourism Association.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 4/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 4/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $451054.00/$459148.00

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $59331.37 / $560384.94

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $451054.00 / $459148.00

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($8800.00)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

COVID-19 abruptly impacted ARCD’s programming.  We were unable to celebrate and promote the opening season of farmers markets because many markets were delayed by the state prohibition to operate.  Our wildfire mitigation projects came to a screeching halt because of supply chain interruptions of products and lack of contractor availability before the grant funds expired.  In both cases of farmers markets and wildfire mitigation, ARCD lost several thousands of dollars in administration funds as well as the ability to effectively serve the communities as we had in the past.  Additionally, ARCD was informed that state funds that have supported a portion of the Field School’s expenses for staff and supplies for the past five years would no longer be available as they were being reallocated for *at least* the next two years due to COVID.  ARCD’s endowment fund lost nearly 13% at the onset of the pandemic.  The office building where ARCD rented office space was shut down and inaccessible except in very limited capacity and continues to have limited access.  The ARCD team initially worked from home, connecting through phone calls and Zoom, but eventually found it necessary to find office space that was not shared with other organizations which increased the rent payment by nearly double.  COVID has impacted the ability to also administer several grant opportunities for youth education such as Envirothon and youth conservation interns due to the impact on schools and organizations.  Host sites for AmeriCorps Service Members that had previously committed to hosting ASMs found themselves no longer able to do so, leaving ARCD unable to fulfill program plans and reducing the projected funding/income from the program.  Fortunately, all employees are still working, but due to reduced income pay cuts were necessary in some cases.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
1. Can I keep all employees working (earning income)?
2. Can we rise to meet the challenges presented by COVID and still serve our communities to the degree that we have previously?
3. How do we ensure that the organization survives the next economic challenge? (Because there will always be another one.)

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

A strategic fundraising plan for ARCD has not existed in the past.  The organization has produced small farm-to-table or other very small fundraisers, but these type of fundraisers need a great deal of effort (time/energy) by the organization’s staff and while it does increase the organization’s visibility and opportunity to talk about programs, the financial ROI is marginal.  The organization needs a portfolio of short-term, mid-term, and long-term fundraising and development plans including a planned giving program.  With the opportunity to participate in the Fundraising program, we can diversify our revenue streams to include reasonable fundraising and to better shield ourselves against the next financial challenge ensuring that we carry on our service to our communities when they need us the most. 


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Susan McKinney McKinney, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

Back to List of Applicants

APPLICANT

Mountaineer Food Bank

Total Qualifying Score: 3
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Mountaineer Food Bank
Gassaway, Braxton County, West Virginia 26624
304-364-5518
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Braxton
State (ARC Region) West Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Our mission is to feed West Virginia’s hungry through a network of member feeding programs and engage out state in the fight to end hunger. 

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Our organization works within many of these goals, but no more than in number 2. As a food bank, we distribute fresh fruits and vegetables, dairy and proteins through a variety of programs targeting seniors, children, families and military members. Our Fresh Initiative Kid’s Market provides education to elementary age children while partnering with local growers to introduce children to the local economy while providing them with healthy options. Our mobile pantry and housing program works with local produce collaboratives to source and distribute produce boxes monthly into most of our 48 counties. 

We are currently working to develop a partnership with the CDC, WVU Extension, WVU Health Sciences and many other organizations to create a Prime food pantry model that targets the health and food needs of the highest food insecure communities in West Virginia. 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 40/12 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 32/5 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $4800000/$5000000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $4750769 / $2879051

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $4800000 / $5000000

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($140000)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($681000)
Received From: USDA   Date Received: 6/1/2020
For What Purpose(s): For the prevention and preparation for COVID-19 during distribution of TEFAP USDA commodities

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

COVID-19 has shocked the food system and our ability to source food in a timely manner. During April and May, our organization distribution more food during a 2 month span than ever before. We struggled ordering food due to the competitive nature across the country and saw delays of 2-3 months on deliveries. At a time when food was needed more than ever, transportation networks and food manufacturers were forced to shut down due to safety. 

Due to the massive increases in need and our distribution, we had to hire more staff and bring in more equipment that will take planning to maintain in the event that the pandemic continues or worsens. Once the CARES act kicked in, USDA foods became more available, but almost at so rapid a rate, that we needed additional storage space to take advantage of the foods. We now have two additional facilities that we are maintaining that came about due to COVID-19. Many of the needs were there before, COVID just accelerated and amplified the need to the public. 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
How can our staff keep up
What happens when the commodities and congressional funding diminishes.
How do we build an infrastructure in West Virginia that is prepared for the next disaster as we are currently not as a state?

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

My hope is that participation in the long-term financial management cohort, we will be able to plan for the future needs of our organization financially and to chart the course for developing the infrastructure needed in West Virginia to mitigate natural disasters and public health crisis’s when we are called to action. Part of that will include a massive expansion of our undersized food bank and development of a coordinated food hub system in the state. 


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Short-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Chad Morrison, CEO

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Blue Ridge Mountains Arts Association

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Blue Ridge Mountains Arts Association
Blue Ridge, Fannin County, Georgia 30513
706-632-2144
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Fannin
State (ARC Region) Georgia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Provide opportunities in the realm of the Arts for personal growth of the individual and the economic growth of the community. 

Core Values:

  1. Enhance and preserve the quality and accessibility of the Arts
  2. Honor our rich heritage of Applachia culture
  3. Promote contemporary and multi-cultural Arts
  4. Serve as a catalyst for economic development in the community

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Our organization aligns with goals 1, 2, 4, and 5 via our mission, core values, and day-to-day programming, operations, and initiatives throughout the community. 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/4 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/4 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $122,201/$153,874

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $337,608 / $335,801

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $122,201 / $153,874

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($15,000)
Received From: PPP Loan- United Community Bank   Date Received: 4/25/20
For What Purpose(s): Payroll

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Income is the most obvious and vital negative impact for our organization. Our income sources and fundraisers such as festivals, classes, and events have all been canceled since March, with no end in sight.  We continue to operate out of our Art Center with exhibits and minimal classes, but visitation is down and our offerings are limited based on space.   We have had to scale back hours on some employees and instructors due to Covid limitations and event cancellations equaling less work for some of our staff members. 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Fundraising
Safety
Community and artist support

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

I see this programming helping us navigate and work to a creative solution towards fundraising, mitigating costs and expenses, renew our perspective on our mission and values, and establishing a more long-term plan for our organization and it’s long term livelihood.

 


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Nichole Potzauf, Executive Director, Blue Ridge Mountains Arts Association

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

BRITE Energy Innovators (legal name Tech Belt Energy Innovation Center)

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

BRITE Energy Innovators (legal name Tech Belt Energy Innovation Center)
Warren, Trumbull County, Ohio 44481
330-727-9120
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Trumbull
State (ARC Region) Ohio


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Empowering founders to launch energy technology solutions.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

BRITE aligns with the Appalachian Regional Commission’s goals in the following ways:

First, as an incubator, we invest in entrepreneurial and business development strategies that strengthen Appalachia’s economy. Our portfolio fluctuates with 15-20 high-growth startups that are served with in-depth service along with an additional 40-70 startups that are assessed annually. Second, as the fiber hub for Trumbull County, we are home to Internet infrastructure for businesses of the area and provide fast Internet to our tenants and others that utilize our facility. Third, we strengthen Appalachia’s community and economic development by providing place-based community and economic development on a main street and leverage the region’s strength in energy storage assets (natural gas, coal, research partners, etc) to accelerate the commercialization of new technologies. Lastly, we make every effort to hire and provide professional development opportunities to talented young professionals in our community.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 5/8 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/2 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $1605578/$1545529

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $996287.76 / $913871.00

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $1605578 / $1545529

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($45,700)
Received From: PPP Loan through Cortland Bank   Date Received: mid-April, 2020
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

In many ways, COVID-19 has had a positive impact in that more founders have the time to work on their startups, resulting in our deal-flow of onboarding new companies accelerate from one a week to four a week. Therefore, we have overwhelming demand for services and staff is further stretched. Organizationally, COVID-19 ended traditional fundraising through events, resulting in an expected loss of $115,000 that is needed for non-reimbursable staff time and other operational needs like accounting, utilities and equipment. The organization has also lost rental revenue because it forgave rent for three months for tenants and has lost tenants who didn’t survive the pandemic. 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
cash-on hand and the need for fundraising strategies to ensure unencumbered cash is available; fundraising this year derailed
uptick in demand for services and not having resources to add staff
updating facility to meet new demands of business climate and social distancing

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

This program will assist in identifying best practices and new ways of fundraising and addressing operational concerns. The organization has evolved a lot in the past year by adding staff and securing funding to grow, however its ability to access unencumbered funding has been stalled by the pandemic. The organization is undergoing strategic planning across its service areas to build sustainability and resiliency. 


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Sara Daugherty Daugherty, Director of Operations

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

Back to List of Applicants

APPLICANT

A.C.T.I.O.N Coalition

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

A.C.T.I.O.N Coalition
Mountain City, Johnson County, Tennessee 37683
423-534-1407
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Johnson
State (ARC Region) Tennessee


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

MISSION:

EMPOWER through EDUCATION all members of our community to make the best choices for their lives through understanding of the dangers of substance misuse.

ENCOURAGE those in need of recovery to seek treatment.

ENGAGE those in our recovery community as a valued asset to their families, community and economy of Johnson County.

Bring together community and regional stakeholders to strengthen our community.

Be a community leader and provide resources to our community partners and members.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Substance Use Disorder is a critical national health concern negatively affecting the workforce capacity of Johnson County by lowering our county’s ability to provide a local, viable, available workforce and therefore weaken our economy. Community members who are not actively seeking treatment for SUD or are not able to maintain long term recovery are adding an additional strain on our community’s already overextended resources. ACTION Coalition is committed to providing resources to those needing treatment and seeking to maintain long term recovery as well as providing education tools to our youth and community alike regarding the dangers of Substance Use. By working through a youth focused coalition we are working to enhance leadership skills and build next generation leaders among our youth. 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 5/1 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $160,000/$150,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $342,475 / $331,671

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $160,000 / $150,000

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($26,560)
Received From:   Date Received: 05/04/2020
For What Purpose(s): Payroll Protection Plan loan

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

It has made working in the schools to provide education resources much more difficult as we are having to utilize web based sources. We have not been able to conduct MRT classes in our local jail and we have had tremendous attendance drops in our community education classes. We had to postpone a Sequential Intercept Model training which was going to produce some grant funding for our community and have not been able to attend some of our own training sessions as they were cancelled. As grant funding becomes more difficult to obtain we have had a much harder time with success in our grant applications as well and have had to lay off 3 of our staff members as a result. 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Concern that those needing mental health and substance use disorder treatment will increase
Concern that those in long term recovery will relapse with no way of getting assistance in our community for SUD
Concern that our youth will not receive the drug education and awareness that is critical to them at this time

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Without the support of the coalition and its collaboration with regional resources our community will be left with a huge gap in needed SUD services, and as we are the only organization with the expertise to provide Drug awareness education to our students the loss of the work of the coalition will be devastating to Johnson County. By participating in the long term financial management cohort I believe we can restructure and reorganize our coalition and its work to not be reliant solely on grant funding for the work we do. This cohort will provide insights and resources to sustain this work for the long term as a vital part of our community.  


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Trish Burchette, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

Back to List of Applicants

APPLICANT

Salem Community Center

Total Qualifying Score: 5
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $1.5 million up to $3 million – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Salem Community Center
Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio 44460
330-332-5885
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Columbiana
State (ARC Region) Ohio


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The Salem Community Center is a private not for profit organization dedicated to the improvement of the quality of life within our community. This continuous process will be enhanced by: To be responsive to our membership by addressing emerging and changing community needs and removing economic barriers within available resources. To continue the cycle of giving through service and resources to our community.

Built with money from the McKeown Fund and minds from local community members and businesses, the Salem Community Center exists today representing what is special to all of us and our families.  In continuing the tradition of meeting the needs of our membership, as well as the community, the Salem Community Center represents a place where families can spend time together and those without family can make new relationships that will last a lifetime.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

The Salem Community Center is invested in the heath of its local community.  A healthy community means a healthy economy both on a local and on a global spectrum.

A nation of unhealthy people is a drain on the economy at all levels through decreased productivity and increased healthcare costs.  Teaching and providing people with healthier lifestyle choices enables them to become part of a healthier community.   Healthier adults become more productive at less cost thereby promoting a favorable impact on the local economy.  This, in turn, will have a favorable impact on state and federal economy levels as well.  The Salem Community Center is committed to making wellness a preventative means, not a medical treatment.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 10/75 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 11/110 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $915,500/$1,200,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $2,498,101 / $2,321,878

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $915,500 / $1,200,000

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($1,000,000)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($332,600)
Received From: PPP Loan and EIDL Loan   Date Received: April and August
For What Purpose(s): Payroll and Utilities

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

On March 16th, 2020 we were asked to close our doors to help flatten the curve and stop the spread of the coronavirus. We officially re-opened to members after 77 days on June 1, 2020. The SCC has been greatly impacted by COVID-19. At the time we were permitted to re-open, it was only for a limited number of guests. Costly social distancing structural expenses, the additional cleaning staff required and not being permitted to have sporting programs/events/rentals has greatly affected our income. Staffing has been difficult, due to lack of childcare, caring for elder family members, staff who are in age/medical continued shelter group, and the fact that most employees made more money by being unemployed than returning to work.

We operate in many different capacities, serving a diverse population on a normal basis. Starting back with limited class and program offerings has been very challenging. Social distancing is also a challenging aspect. Fortunately, we have a very large facility and are able to space out employees, members, equipment, and classes.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Membership reduction
Increased expenses
Getting people back both employees and members

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

By participating in this program my hope is to learn and share with others who are experiencing similar hardships.  I look forward to investigating new ways to not only do business but understand what others are facing.  My goal is to understand what the community as a whole is facing, take that knowledge and apply it to my operational plan for the next 6-18 months.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Short-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 B: 5-Week Course (Mar. 1, 2021-April 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Heather Young, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

Back to List of Applicants

APPLICANT

Festiv-ALL Charleston, West Virginia, Inc

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Festiv-ALL Charleston, West Virginia, Inc
Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia 25301
304-470-0489
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Kanawha
State (ARC Region) West Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The mission of FestivALL Charleston is to create, produce and present vibrant arts experiences and entertainment opportunities and serve as a catalyst for others in the community to do the same.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

FestivALL aligns with several of the aforementioned goals by:

  • FestivALL helps create a lively city environment where entrepreneurs, artists and families want to visit, live, work and play. It’s become a time for homecomings, reunions and inviting friends to visit.
  • The arts are an essential part of Charleston’s identity and FestivALL showcases Charleston as a unique and desirable place to visit, contributing to the financial growth of artists and area businesses. Each summer FestivALL brings in an estimated $1.5 million in local spending, by residents and attendees from 17+ states.
  • FestivALL provides educational opportunities for young people such as the Neighborhood Arts Program (including Ticket Town,  Art-for-ALL Kids’ Juried Art Exhibition, and the Children’s Art Fair), and summer internships, as well as informative panels and seminars for adults.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/1 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $360,000/$275,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: October-September

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $534,541 / $534438

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $360,000 / $275,000

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($33,630)
Received From: SBA and WV Department of Arts Culture and History   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s): Operating Expenses

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Programming & Logistics:

The current health crisis and stay-at-home order in effect has prompted our organization to reimagine what our signature event, FestivALL 2020, can look like. FestivALL is cherished for the unique experiences it provides and for the spotlight it shines on our community’s artists. FestivALL remains active in its mission to create and sustain a community that is rich in arts experiences and opportunities which stimulates the local economy. We are here to provide these things to our artists, partners, audience and new audiences as we pivot our programming to a safe and impactful, virtual manner.

Staff and committees have curated a dynamic and engaging 15 days of virtual programming to be premiered during our originally scheduled dates – June 14-28. All FestivALL-produced content will be provided to the public at no charge. Unlike prior years, FestivALL will not receive earned income (ticket sales, booth fees, etc.) to help offset the expenses of event production and management. With so many facing difficult financial times, FestivALL remains committed to one of its core values: providing meaningful arts and entertainment experiences at low-to-no cost to attendees. In 2019, 76% of FestivALL events were free to attend, up from 2018, and will continue to rise in 2020.

Traditionally planned to span 4 days, FestivALL Fall 2020 has quickly become robust in the hopes that with October comes the opportunity for in-person fellowship. Due to the sudden and devastating cancellations of so many locally produced and hosted events, many partners have opted to reschedule their event(s) for the fall. To accommodate their request, we are extending FestivALL Fall to at least 9 days – providing what is hopefully a catalyst in the journey to some semblance of normalcy. This would make our October event the same size as a traditional FestivALL (before we extended to 15 days in 2019).

Financials & Operations:

FestivALL’s fiscal year runs October 1 – September 30th and our organization operates on a cash basis. These two facts are integral to consider when reviewing the budget portion in Part V. This timetable means that a FestivALL Fall in a same calendar year as a June festival is included in the forthcoming fiscal year for our organization. As a result of rescheduling several of our larger in-person performances like Dance FestivALL and Air Play, our FY20 budget reflects $30,200 in restricted income that we’ve received but will be deferred to FY21 (October 2020-September 2021). In addition to deferred income and lost earned revenue, decrease in corporate sponsorships and foundation support gives cause for concern for this year and the upcoming year(s).

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
COVID-19 impact on financials for the next 5-10 years
Businesses being more conservative with sponsoring/local businesses closing
COVID-19 prohibiting in-person events well in to 2021

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Through the participation in Long-Term Financial Strategies workshop, it is my hope to gain insight on how to lay groundwork now to aid in sustainability: best practices, etc. 


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? Yes

List of Organizations in Proposed Cohort:
Capitol Market

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Maria Belcher Belcher, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

Back to List of Applicants

APPLICANT

Walker Area Community Foundation

Total Qualifying Score: 4
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Walker Area Community Foundation
Jasper, Walker County, Alabama 35501
205-302-0001
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Walker
State (ARC Region) Alabama


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The mission of the Walker Area Community Foundation is to build a permanent endowment that will forever help support the charitable needs of our community and improve the quality of life for the people of Walker County and the surrounding area.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

    1. Collaborating with Jasper Main Street, the Walker County Economic and Industrial Development Authority, the Jasper Industrial Development Board, Alabama’s Communities of Excellence (ACE) and any other program that we can find. We are working now on an application to OPAL to establish a cohort to pursue Opportunity Zone investment in our community.
    2. The Walker County Health Action Partnership and the Behavioral Health Priority Group
    3. We are investing in the Demand Response Transportation System for Walker County
    4. We recently completed the U.S. EPA’s Recreational Economies for Rural Communities (RERC) technical assistance program and have a plan that is in the implementation stages.
    5. We are a partner with Your Town Alabama Designing Its Future, the Walker County Leadership Program, the Walker County Youth Leadership Program and we are starting a Nexus group for the 18-30 y/o’s to teach leadership skills to the next generation.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 6/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 5/1 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $4,458,660/$3,542,805

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $9,978,238 / $4,000,484

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $4,458,660 / $3,542,805

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($300,000)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Jasper Retail has been hit hard. The manufacturing sector was hurt but is rebounding. Sales tax and lodging tax has been reduced and civic budgets have been curtailed. The infusion of CARES Act and other Disaster related investments have stabilized the local economy to some extent.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Loss of revenue
Disaster relief requests in excess of our capacity to respond
Loss of morale among staff due to COVID

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Helping us develop additional revenue streams.
Help us find and point our grantees to more resources.
Develop coping skills to mitigate the psychological strain.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Pam Fikes, VP of Grants and Nonprofit Support

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

WaterWays

Total Qualifying Score: 8
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: Yes – 0
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

WaterWays
Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tennessee 37406
423-413-0471
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Hamilton
State (ARC Region) Tennessee


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

WaterWays mission is to empower communities to protect and restore their watersheds where they live, work, and play.  Our motto is  clean water, healthy communities.  

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

We always start with education, capacity building in young people and community members to know their impacts on the water and how their community will thrive with clean water.  We teach kids and college students about innovative methods for improving water quality  and give them the tools to make that happen.  We work closely with water and stormwater utilities to improve stormwater practices and improve water quality for drinking water.  We also help people test their water.    We are also working on restoration of streams and abandoned mines, which will improve communities. 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 3/2 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/5 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $340,000/$328,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $233355 / $227718

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $340,000 / $328,000

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($22462)
Received From: First Bank   Date Received: 4/17/2020
For What Purpose(s): salary and rent

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Closed down our thrift store for 2.5 months. Could not do programs or community work . Lost program income and camp income and sponsorships.   So difficult onboarding a new AmeriCorps VISTA when we cannot work together in person.  got sick and lost a couple of weeks of work. 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Long term financial stability therefore a need for a development plan
How to negotiate Covid and keep our thrift store open and our programs going while not wearing out staff
short term financial viability

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Creating a development plan will give us a roadmap for how to improve our financial outlook and engage more long term supporters.   It will help guide us.  We recently rebranded and it will help us get more notoriety as well.  


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: MaryBeth Sutton Sutton, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Northeastern Pennsylvania Industrial Resource Center, Inc. (D/B/A NEPIRC)

Total Qualifying Score: 5
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $1.5 million up to $3 million – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes

Northeastern Pennsylvania Industrial Resource Center, Inc. (D/B/A NEPIRC)

Total Qualifying Score: 5
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $1.5 million up to $3 million – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Northeastern Pennsylvania Industrial Resource Center, Inc. (D/B/A NEPIRC)
Hanover Township, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania 18706
570-819-8966
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Luzerne
State (ARC Region) Pennsylvania


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Our Mission

NEPIRC provides customized solutions and expert guidance to clients within the manufacturing and manufacturing support sectors in order to maximize their productivity, growth and long-term viability while also raising awareness of the importance of our manufacturing sector.

 

Our Vision

We enhance and improve the quality of life in our region by ensuring the long-term success and growth of our clients, their employees and their suppliers. 

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

NEPIRC provides small and mid-sized manufacturers across an 11-county community (approximately 1,000 manufacturers with over 44,000 full-time employees in total) with no-cost and low-cost informational seminars and webinars, no-cost operational and strategic assessments, and affordable technical expertise and consultative services so that they can continue to be competitive in an aggressive global economy, can maximize their profitability and long-term sustainability and, ultimately, maintain and increase the number of full-time industrial jobs within the region. NEPIRC provides expertise in areas such as Continuous Improvement, Quality Systems, Strategy, Business Growth, Cybersecurity, Advanced Manufacturing Technology and other disciplines that small and mid-sized manufacturing firms, particularly those within NEPIRC’s rural communities, would not otherwise be able to access. As such, NEPIRC fills a valuable void in the marketplace and acts as many manufacturers’ external consultant of choice. We strengthen our regional economy by ensuring that the industrial firms in our area, which constitute, on average, 11% of total employment (and, therefore, is our region’s 3rd largest employment sector), remain strong and competitive. 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 11/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 15/2 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $1757537/$1975430

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $2194000 / $2145500

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $1757537 / $1975430

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($225000)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($140721)
Received From: National Institute of Standards & Technology MEP Program   Date Received: June 1, 2020
For What Purpose(s): To expand our outreach to manufacturers and provide them with additional COVID-19 recovery assistance at no-cost or low-cost.

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

COVID-19 has impacted our organization in several ways. 

First, the impact of COVID-19 upon the manufacturers we serve had a dramatic impact upon our project fees, which are payments that manufacturers make to us when they participate in our programs and/or use our technical experts. While we provide a high level of no-cost services, there are some technical services that we charge for, typically at rates that are below-market for engineers and manufacturing experts. During the COVID-19 pandemic, our project fees were down 58% when compared to that same period last year. Thus, from March through September, our revenue decreased by nearly $200,000 from what it was last year. 

Second, the impact of COVID-19 upon our state treasury negatively impacted our business as the PA Department of Community & Economic Development, upon which our organization relies for funding, cut our funding by nearly 60% for the fiscal year of July 1, 2020 through June 30, 2019. Thus, we have to find a way to function on that reduced level of state support (basically, losing about $350,000 of revenue). For an organization with a $2 million operating budget, losing $350,000 of state support and another $200,000 of industry support is very significant.

Lastly, the lingering impacts of COVID-19 upon our manufacturers is making it difficult for us to attract new grants and attract new manufacturing clients (and their revenue). It seems as if the local manufacturing community has put everything “on hold”. So, while our past 6-8 months have been tough, there is really a lull in manufacturing engagement with us right now, meaning that the future does not look that favorable either. 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Operating with a balanced budget so that we do not continue to experience negative cash flow.
Accomplishing our mission of serving small and mid-sized manufacturers and reaching out to them and providing them with meaningful engagements while not operating at a loss.
Attracting and retaining qualified talent, despite a difficult economic time.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

I believe that I and our CFO have a good foundation on which we can develop a future direction for this organization and allow it and the constituent manufacturers that it serves continue to thrive and grow. However, creating and implementing that plan in a vacuum is very difficult, and we do not have the resources to commit to a full-blown, high-priced consultative engagement with a 3rd party to guide us. Our CFO and I have deep, robust discussions about how to drive the organization forward – things we want to do and feel we can accomplish as leaders of the organization and leaders within the region. However, without a “sounding board” to talk these ideas through and refine them, they will rarely get past the “idea” phase. I believe that participation in this effort will allow us to refine our ideas and make real progress for NEPIRC and our region. 


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Mission & Operations

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Eric J Esoda Esoda, President & CEO

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Kopernik Society of Broome County Inc. DBA Kopernik Observatory & Science Center

Total Qualifying Score: 8
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : No (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Kopernik Society of Broome County Inc. DBA Kopernik Observatory & Science Center
Vestal, Broome County, New York 13850
607-748-3685
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Broome
State (ARC Region) New York


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Kopernik’s mission is to be an innovative learning institution that promotes interdisciplinary education in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). It achieves this mission by interpreting scientific discoveries and research for the public and noting the effects of these on our community and lives to analyze issues and make informed decisions about our world.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Kopernik is an informal educational facility whose focus is on STEM.  Kopernik promotes life-long learning. Kopernik classes, events and programs are for students as young as 3 years old and continue throughout a person’s lifespan. Schools utilize Kopernik’s programs to augment their classroom curriculum. Both Kopernik’s student-focused and teacher in-service programs are aligned with the soon-to-be-implemented, New York state-version of the Next Generation Science Standard (NGSS) that is currently being rolled out by New York State Education Department.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 0/4 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/8 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $480,000/$400,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $860,504 / $244,946

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $480,000 / $400,000

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($48,000)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($29,800)
Received From: M&T Bank   Date Received: April 20, 2020
For What Purpose(s): Payroll (PPP)

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a drastic effect on Kopernik’s revenue stream. 2020 income dropped over $110,000 relative to the same 8-month period during 2019, a 75% loss of revenue. By necessity, all spring school field trips were cancelled. Income from our Friday Night programs as well as group programs and events has dried up and will not return until we can safely reopen to the public.

The timing of the pandemic could not have come at a worse time. Kopernik had to close to the public in mid-March 2020 and all of our school field trips were cancelled. All private group events from scout troops, corporations and clubs were cancelled including our RocketFest and Race to the Stars fundraisers. Although Kopernik did run summer camps, they were run virtually and were essentially a break-even effort designed solely to serve the local community. Field trips, private events and our summer programs are Kopernik’s main source of revenue and gives us the reserves to last through the late fall and winter. The loss of revenue has put our finances in a challenging position.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
When can we safely reopen to the public
Will we have enough reserves to pay our fixed costs until we can start generating revenue
Will the economy recover sufficiently so that the public will have the disposable income to spend on Kopernik programs

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

I hope to receive guidance on how best to reduce costs and yet remain a viable resource to the community. I am also looking for ways to pursue new avenues of revenue generation (grants and donations).


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Short-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Andrew Deskur, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Just For Kids Child Advocacy Center

Total Qualifying Score: 7
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: Yes – 0
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Just For Kids Child Advocacy Center
Beckley, Raleigh County, West Virginia 25801
304-992-9434
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Raleigh
State (ARC Region) West Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Our mission is to create a safe community for children and families by preventing and responding to child abuse through teamwork, collaboration and services.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Just For Kids provides support to every family in the three counties we serve.  By providing a unique service to families whose children have suffered from criminal abuse including sexual, physical and emotional abuse, our Child Advocacy Center serves as a hub for a team of law enforcement, child protective services and other social services to investigate abuse, provide advocacy to the families, counseling to children who have disclosed abuse and on-going prevention and awareness training in the community.  The health and well being of the children and families we serve is the driving force of our work.  All of our services are free of charge and we are the only organization in the three counties that provides this coordinated response to child abuse.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 8/2 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 8/2 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $525,000/$495,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $514,000 / $502,000

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $525,000 / $495,000

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($60,000)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($71,000)
Received From: SBA Loan through United Bank   Date Received: 4-20-20
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Just For Kids was not able to hold our Spring Fundraiser, hold any of our face-to-face trainings or promote our work at local and regional events.  In addition we have had to purchase equipment to ensure safe working conditions for our staff who are front line workers interviewing children who have been abused, meeting with their family members and accompanying them to court when necessary.  We have instituted strict protocol to maintain as safe an environment as possible, including adding additional office space so that our counselor could see individuals without interfering with the general operation of our organization.  The bank building where we are located donated the space, but we had to paint, recarpet and equip the space with camera’s for safety at considerable cost.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Staff member getting Covid and having to reduce or stop providing interviews to children
Funding from any of our many funding streams drying up and not having enough reserve to get through and having to lay people off
Children not having the means to report abuse to trusted adults because of their isolation

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

As a non-profit that has always relied on at least half of our funding to come from fundraising, we have always been challenged by developing fundraising campaigns that have been effective.  It is clear that new approaches must be developed in these Covid times and we see this training as a way to brainstorm with others and hear from experts in the field of fundraising on new ideas.  It is likely that state and federal funds will be reduced over the next few years and as an essential service to the community we want to ensure our sustainability.  Just For Kids has a committed and hard working board that is willing to look at new and innovative methods to achieve our goals and we feel confident that with support like this training we will be best equipped to move forward.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Scott Miller, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

White County Chamber of Commerce

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

White County Chamber of Commerce
Cleveland, White County, Georgia 30528
706-865-5356
Email
www

County (ARC Region) White
State (ARC Region) Georgia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The White County Chamber of Commerce is a non-profit organization whose mission and purpose is to enhance the economic vitality and quality of life for the community of White County.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

  1. We act as the business retention and expansion arm of the White County, Helen and Cleveland economic development efforts.  We have no employer that would qualify as a traditional large employer in White County.  Therefore, all of our efforts are focused on entrepreneurial and small business strategies.
  2. That work directly ties us to preparing a workforce that meets the need of our growing economy. Our partners in this effort are our local system, regional partners Truett-McConnell University, University of North Georgia, Piedmont College, North Georgia Technical and Lanier Tech, as well as statewide partners at UGA and GT,  
  3. We work diligently to ensure that our businesses have the community assets they need to work efficiently.  This more often than not includes access to broadband (with redundancies), logistics issues and allocation of natural resources, like water.
  4. One third of our county is national forest.  Additionally, we are home to the headwaters of the Chattahoochee River, the most heavily used water resource in Georgia. We leverage and protect these assets with careful tourism promotion, supporting agri-business functions that protect the lands, and gathering the community in our Vision 2030 program.
  5. The Chamber hosts our Leadership White County to create a cohort of individuals that through creative team building and discussion as facilitated by the Fanning Institute of UGA.  This group learns the valuable skills of collaboration and visioning that includes multiple community groups. 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(6)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/1 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $324,000/$324,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $276,473.94 / $215,601.73

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $324,000 / $324,000

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($83000)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($0)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Our Chamber faces two key issues impacting how we serve the community. These issues are not uncommon for most any non-profit organization. 

 

First, from a service delivery standpoint, we are understaffed by 2 positions.  The needs of our stakeholders has evolved with more focus on recovery and resiliency efforts.  Our success in recovery for our tourism partners will be short lived as more and more demand will be placed on those consumers to go to other locations outside of our market.  Our event venues, a significant source of tourism income, are still suffering greatly. 

 

Secondly, our fundraising in non-existent as the primary source was in-person, event driven sources.  We have not found a way to replace that income. This is significant for our investors as to properly serve the area, we need more funding from outside of our primary stakeholders. 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Marked loss of event-driven fundraising. This will greatly impact our ability to have the funds to serve our investors and stakeholders.
Loss of membership dues. While our economy is well into recovery, some members still struggle and are concerned about a resurgence that could potentially shutter their businesses. They are naturally hesitant to re-invest.
The Community has long depended on the Chamber to be the “party planner” for the community. Without events, some of the community does not see the incredible impact that our small organization has had on the recovery efforts of our key industries, particularly manufacturing and tourism,

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Collaboration and learning from others in the same situation really puts learning in a tactical way.  I believe this will provide us with the skills to further develop our organization and those non-profits that also depend on our leadership.

 

 


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Mission & Operations

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Beth Truelove, President, White County Chamber of Commerce

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

Back to List of Applicants

APPLICANT

The Arc Of The Mid Ohio Valley Inc

Total Qualifying Score: 7
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: Yes – 0
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

The Arc Of The Mid Ohio Valley Inc
Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia 26101
304-422-3151
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Wood
State (ARC Region) West Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Since 1955, The Arc of the Mid Ohio Valley has been dedicated to ensuring a satisfying and productive life for children and adults with intellectual, cognitive, and related developmental disabilities by providing programs and services that enable, empower, and encourage them to live, learn, work, worship, and play in their community…. along with their peers and neighbors! 

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

The Arc of the Mid Ohio Valley aligns with the following goals of the ARC:

  1. Invest in entrepreneurial and business development strategies that strengthen Appalachia’s economy;- The Arc of the Mid Ohio Valley provides referral, support, advocacy training, programs and services to people with disabilities. These programs include vocational training opportunities and employment  in our thrift shops and a café that will be opened in the next few months. Additionally, the café will provide an opportunity for non-traditional employment for people with disabilities to sell their jewelry, paintings, photography, and other artwork. 
  2. Increase the education, knowledge, skills, and health of residents to work and succeed in Appalachia;- The Arc of the Mid Ohio Valley supports people with disabilities to succeed in their community through education and advocacy in such topics as post-secondary education options, vocational support, housing, and community integration. We work with children from birth to three years old, students, transitioning youth, and adults and their families to encourage and support empowerment and success in one’s own community.
  3. Invest in critical infrastructure, especially broadband; transportation, including the Appalachian Development Highway System; and water/wastewater systems;- We are working to improve transportation resources for people with disabilities in our community in collaboration with the Wood County Senior Citizens Association, SW Resources, Community Resources, Inc. and other community collaborators.
  4. Strengthen Appalachia’s community and economic development potential by leveraging the Region’s natural and cultural heritage assets; and- We are encouraging microbusinesses for people with disabilities focused on local handmade artwork to empower and encourage economic self-sufficiency. 
  5. Build the capacity and skills of current and next-generation leaders and organizations to innovate, collaborate, and advance community and economic development. we work daily to empower people with disabilities to advocate for themselves, contribute to their community, and experience complete integration as future leaders.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: Yes

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 15/7 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 14/8 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $750,000/$700,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $751,179 / $708,403

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $750,000 / $700,000

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($112,158)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($110,500)
Received From: Peoples Bank   Date Received: April 23, 2020
For What Purpose(s): Payroll

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

COVID-19 impacted our organization by slowing down the number of referrals to our Birth to Three Regional Administrative Unit 2 program; disallowing many of our in-person trainings, meetings, advocacy and educational opportunities; and forcing the closing of our thrift shops for several months. We lost income due to decreased referrals for Birth to Three and the two thrift shops. More importantly, we have been unable to provide the same quality programs and services to people with disabilities and at risk for disabilities. 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Protecting the health and safety of those we serve
Protecting the health and safety of our staff
Remaining financially sound so as to ensure vital service provision well into the future

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

I believe that a greater knowledge of fundraising and purposeful planning will encourage long-term success for our organization. Developing a formal fundraising plan will provide a road map for our future that will allow us to meet the needs of people with disabilities in our community for years to come. This important plan will keep us relevant and allow us to respond appropriately to challenges such as Covid-19. 


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Elizabeth Ford, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Western NC Housing Partnership Inc

Total Qualifying Score: 10
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : No (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Western NC Housing Partnership Inc
Hendersonville, Cherokee County, North Carolina 28792
828-692-2243
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Cherokee
State (ARC Region) North Carolina


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Our mission is to work with organizations and individuals in both the public and private sectors to develop high quality affordable housing for workforce housing and older adults in a 31 county region of Western North Carolina

  • We work with local governments, COG’s and other nonprofits to identify housing needs
  • Recruit and partner with private developers and nonprofit organizations
  • We serve as a liaison between developers and local, state, and federal governments
  • We educate the general public, COG and elected officials about high quality affordable housing for hard working families

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

We provide affordable housing that allows for greater entrepreneurial and new business development in Western NC.  The majority of our small town officials have indicated that affordable housing is a significant issue in their town and could create a barrier to entry of new business development.  Many town leaders have indicated that some employees are having to live outside the immediate area as affordable housing is unavailable.  We have invested in housing studies in more than 15 counties in Western NC.  The studies provided demographic and employment, income population and demand data for affordable housing needs.  These studies were shared with COG stakeholders, economic development directors, county managers and local town officials.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/1 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $149954/$149954

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $318715 / $120838

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $149954 / $149954

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

COVID-19 has significantly restricted our ability to search for viable development land in most Western NC counties.  We are fortunate to be pursuing land in Murphy (Cherokee County) as it was identified prior to COVID-19.  While we have continued to provide in-depth housing market studies to COGs we have been unable to meet with them in-person or provide ‘live’ training.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Rent Moratorium and retaining our residents during this difficult time in our nation
Ability to develop affordable housing in Western NC as many trades people are not working at this time
Significantly higher cost of materials during COVID-19

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Our income projections have dropped significantly this year and certain projects may be delayed in completion resulting in further erosion of income. We would like to provide a housing study in every single county in Western NC but lack the funding at this time.  The data in these studies is of significant assistance to economic leaders and stakeholders.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Short-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Joy Strassel Strassel, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Friends of Deckers Creek

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding:
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Friends of Deckers Creek
Morgantown, Monongalia County, West Virginia 26505
304-296-5695
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Monongalia
State (ARC Region) West Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

To improve the natural qualities of, increase the public concern for, and promote the enjoyment of the Deckers Creek Watershed.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

4. Strengthen Appalachia’s community and economic development potential by leveraging the Region’s natural and cultural heritage assets

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $unknown/$unknown

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $419,509.00 / $379,246.00

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $unknown / $unknown

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($17,400)
Received From: Small Business Administration Payroll Protection Program administered through local branch of Huntington Bank   Date Received: 5/27/2020
For What Purpose(s): Payroll Protection Program

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Office operations restricted.  Board meetings conducted via video/tele conferencing. 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Continued funding
Staff illness
Staff turnover

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Executive Director and Board Members are inexperienced and need development. 


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? Yes

List of Organizations in Proposed Cohort:
Friends of the Cheat

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Short-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: William Pennington, Board Member and Board Treasurer

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

Back to List of Applicants

APPLICANT

Ohio-West Virginia Youth Leadership Association

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Ohio-West Virginia Youth Leadership Association
Parsons, Tucker County, West Virginia 26287
304-675-5899
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Tucker
State (ARC Region) West Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

We believe that helping youth achieve their full potential is our primary mission.  We seek to help youth develop leadership and citizenship skills for a lifelong commitment to service through character-building programs for all that strengthen spirit, mind and body.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

The Youth Leadership Association aligns with 4 of the 5 goals.  YLA’s Teen Entrepreneurship Summit gives the next generation of entrepreneurs the opportunity to learn from today’s actual entrepreneurs.  While attending the summit, youth have the opportunity to create their own business from the ground up.  They develop a business plan and marketing strategies.  The interaction with local entrepreneurs gives the youth the chance to ask questions and make connections to help them succeed as they start their journey of entrepreneurship.  Not only youth from this summit but also from our Leadership Summits gain knowledge in the importance of community involvement, leadership and service to others.

Horseshoe’s Governor’s Youth Opportunity Camps give underprivileged youth from ages 7-12 the opportunity to see they have options in their lives to break what could be generations of poverty.  YOC allows the youth to be kids enjoying the outdoors, 3 hot meals a day and to know someone cares about them.  That gives them the self-esteem needing to make better choices in their future.

YLA assists in leveraging the Region’s natural and cultural heritage assets by bringing youth and adults to the Monongalia National Forest and the beauty that surrounds it.  YLA’s Camp Horseshoe is the setting for the Teen Entrepreneurship Summit, Leadership Summits and also the Heritage Arts Summits.  Each spring and fall, people for all over the U.S. come to Horseshoe to reconnect with their heritage through quilting.  Horseshoe has also held bread making classes and basket weaving.  

Through the YLA service chapters across WV and Ohio, YLA instills the importance of leadership, service and civic responsibility.  The service chapters have the opportunity to not only help their family, schools and community but also to participate in Youth in Government and Model United Nations.  Youth in Government allows the youth to actually “be” the state government by taking over the Capitol, writing legislation they believe will benefit West Virginia, argue cases before the Youth Supreme Court, lobbying and so much more.  They have a hands on experience in how their state government works.  Model United Nations gives the youth a front row seat on issues facing the world and how, by representing different countries, to help resolve pressing issues concerning their new country.

 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 6/6 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 6/6 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $900,000/$945,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $1,398,533 / $1,323,537

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $900,000 / $945,000

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($0)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($103,200)
Received From: Payroll Protection Plan   Date Received: April 20, 2020
For What Purpose(s): Payroll and utilities

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

COVID-19 has required us to  cancel 2 of our biggest in person programs  for 2020 and is threatening the same for 2021 except for more of our programs.  Youth in Government had to be cancelled and refunds given.  Due to social distancing requirements, we also had to significantly cut the number of youth we were able to allow at our Summits during the summer.  Without being able to meet with YLA chapters in school and in person at our conferences there is no YLA organization.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Lack of revenue to keep our organization a float.
Creating ways to keep youth engaged virtually.
The possibility of having to reduce staff.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

We are hoping the financial portions of the program will help us to develop a plan to keep the organization going until the COVID-19 restrictions are lifted through short-term financial management and fundraising.  That along with the long-term financial management will help us to come back stronger.  Thus giving us the ability to help even more youth in the future.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Short-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Alicia Ridenour Ridenour, Chief Fiscal Officer

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

Back to List of Applicants

APPLICANT

The Greater Cumberland Committee

Total Qualifying Score: 5
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : No (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $100,000 to $250,000 – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

The Greater Cumberland Committee
Cumberland, Allegany County, Maryland 21502
301-876-2820
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Allegany
State (ARC Region) Maryland


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

TGCC focuses on projects of regional relevance in the areas of economic development,
transportation, education, energy and natural resources and next generation leadership.
Since the beginning, our motto, “to create one region, with one vision, for one future,” has
served as our north star and has been the guiding principle for TGCC’s program of work.
Our ability to think and plan for the future of our region with wisdom, imagination and
with the long view in mind, has been integral to the success of our signature projects.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

TGCC is a regional economic development organization headquartered in Allegany County,
Maryland. One of our signature programs of work is the completion of the unfinished portion of Corridor N, an ADHS corridor located on US
219 from I-68 near Grantsville to the PA Turnpike near Somerset. Only about 8 miles remain
unfinished and TGCC was the lead convening organization for the bi-state effort to complete 11 miles
in 2018, and approximately 1.4 miles in Maryland is currently under construction, leveraging more than $400M in investment. Current studies predict significant economic growth and expansion as a result of a finished corridor resulting from increased haul times,
business expansion, increased visitors, supply chain improvements, increased access to
labor markets, etc. This corridor is also important to the greater region in that it is expected to relieve congestion and increase safety on neighboring north/south corridors.

TGCC is also the parent organization of the I-68 Regional Alliance, a tri-state coalition of
economic development and tourism leaders working together to create a business
environment focused on job creation, diversification, expansion and entrepreneurship that will strengthen Appalachia’s economy.. The Alliance is presently working on an initiative to grow the outdoor economy in our region as well as to strengthen supply chain relationships between local vendors and aerospace/defense businesses located in the region.

TGCC celebrates its 20th anniversary this year and is an organization with many loyal
members and partners, including business, civic and government leaders, and elected
officials at the local, state and federal level.  One of our membership categories is “Emerging Leaders”.  It is our goal to foster next generation leadership within and outside of our organization.  I am also a member of the inaugural ALI class which has been an incredible benefit for my organization and our programs of work not only in terms of relationship building but also in terms of training and skill building.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/1 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $171,135/$170000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $135,800 / $141,534

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $171,135 / $170000

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($100000)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($30700)
Received From: SBA and State of Maryland   Date Received: April and pending from State of Maryland
For What Purpose(s): payroll, rent, utilities

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Our biggest concern related to the pandemic is its impact on our member’s businesses and the potential loss of membership dues revenue in 2021 and beyond.  We understand as an organization that we need to diversify our funding model and are looking at innovative and impactful ways to do that.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
decline in membership and related dues in 2021
need to diversify funding model in the near term due to concerns related to decline in membership
need to diversify funding model in the long term to grow organization, amplify mission, create sustainability

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

I’m very interested in learning more about long term financial management and how that can incorporate diversifying our revenue streams to include grant funding, investor campaigns, micro-lending opportunities and the like.  We are interested in amplifying our impact and mission by growing our programs of work.  I anticipate we will need to bring on at least one additional staff member and our overhead expenses including payroll will increase.  I am very interested in learning more about how to create long term financial sustainability.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? Yes

List of Organizations in Proposed Cohort:
Allegany Arts Council

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Short-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Jennifer Walsh, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Schuyler County Partnership for Economic Development (SCOPED)

Total Qualifying Score: 8
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Schuyler County Partnership for Economic Development (SCOPED)
Watkins Glen, Schuyler County, New York 14891
607-535-4341
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Schuyler
State (ARC Region) New York


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Our mission is to leverage our collaboration with public and private partners to foster a vibrant and diverse rural economy and workforce focused on building high value-added production businesses and innovation hubs while taking advantage of Schuyler County’s natural and cultural environment to create a prosperous community and raise the standard of living for our residents. 

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

  1. Invest in entrepreneurial and business development strategies that strengthen Appalachia’s economy;

SCOPED stimulates entrepreneurial culture having created an “Entrepreneurial Bootcamp” beginning in 2015. The organization assists with business strategies, market studies, financial development for start-ups including making angel investor connections, creating conventional banking relationships, providing a SCOPED loan for working capital that can be used to leverage conventional loans, as well as providing assistance with obtaining permitting, legal, accounting and general services. The organization provides succession planning assistance and connections to mentors. Mentors are required for new businesses that take a working capital loan from SCOPED.

  1. Increase the education, knowledge, skills, and health of residents to work and succeed in Appalachia;

SCOPED has a continuous learning initiative underway that has a goal to provide an attitudinal change within the community. The mission is to create an ever-learning community of residents starting from birth with individuals continually learning, and being vital, until death.  We have started by compiling all opportunities for learning, including workplace knowledge, entrepreneurial skills, self-enrichment, physical health improvement, social experiences, arts, literature, IT, outdoor recreation,  and youth-related enrichment (ie Robotics) and youth entrepreneurial experiences.

  1. Invest in critical infrastructure, especially broadband; transportation, including the Appalachian Development Highway System; and water/wastewater systems;

SCOPED has invested in critical infrastructure through Project Seneca, a redevelopment initiative that includes as it first project the development of a regional wastewater treatment facility. This $32 million project had a ribbon-cutting on Friday, October 2, 2020, and allows for two Villages to share resources and reduce operation & management costs while increasing overall capacity to allow for increased economic development. The organization is also advocating for broadband, 5G and other new technologies to provide a digital highway for our community. The Schuyler County Industrial Development Agency, which SCOPED provides administration for, has taken the strengthening and expansion of broadband throughout our area as the major goal – therefore, SCOPED is directly engaged in fulfilling this goal.

  1. Strengthen Appalachia’s community and economic development potential by leveraging the Region’s natural and cultural heritage assets; 

SCOPED is the designated economic development organization for Schuyler County and is located in the Finger Lakes of New York. Seneca Lake is a key asset for the economic vitality of the County. Within the County, also, are 44 named waterfalls, many of them within the Watkins Glen State Park (named the 2nd best State Park in the US). The County is home to over 100 wineries, breweries, distilleries, cideries.  The County is home to Watkins Glen, the home of the first American Road Race following WWII.  It is now known globally as a cultural center for international racing as Formula 1 Racing for North America was hosted by Watkins Glen International from the 1960’s-1980.  The area receives over 4 million visitors annually.  The County economy relies on the tourism that flows to the beverage facilities as well as to the vineyards, trout streams, 9000-acre Sugar Hill State Forest, and the Finger Lakes National Forest (the only national forest in the state of New York). Within our traded sector, the number one export for economic development is lumber. The value of this exported good is critical for our well-being and is a natural resource we must continually strengthen.  SCOPED is very concerned about the devastating impact that the Emerald Ash Borer has had and the impact that the blue-green algae and Lantern Fly may have on our tourism economy. Tourism is the largest employment sector for our county and has been unbelievably impacted by COVID 19.   

  1. Build the capacity and skills of current and next-generation leaders and organizations to innovate, collaborate, and advance community and economic development.

SCOPED started the Leadership Schuyler program in 2002. This program is designed to provide experiences, exposure, skills development, strategic planning, and management training for the next generation of for-profit, non-profit, and government leaders in the area.  SCOPED continues to provide mentorship and high school class enrichment exercises, in addition to the work it is doing with Leadership Schuyler. The program was transitioned to the Watkins Glen Area Chamber as they had ample resources to staff the effort.  In early Spring, SCOPED initiated an effort to bring the leaders of the economic development organizations in the Southern Tier together monthly to collaborate and share best practices and insights for tackling the COVID 19 Disaster. Not only does the group discuss strategies and challenges related to COVID; it also discusses other topics that create innovation and makes all areas of the region stronger from an economic development perspective.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(6)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 3/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $425,661/$405,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $511,202 / $602,746

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $425,661 / $405,000

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($175,000)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($150,000)
Received From: EIDL – SBA   Date Received: July
For What Purpose(s): Operational Costs including personnel costs, occupancy costs and program costs.

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Our workload increased 100% due to the need to provide one-on-one assistance to businesses including triaging PPP, EIDL, Shared Work and unemployment claims for sole proprietors. Leadership and salaried staff were working 12-15 hour days .  A staff member did not want to return to the office when it was ok to return to the workplace and exited the organization rather than return to the office environment.

The organization did not receive the budgeted amount of private investment for 2020 and it has been communicated that our largest private investor may cut their giving by 25% while the public monies are scheduled to be cut by 10-20% for next year. These two contributors account for 68% of the organization’s income.  The building that SCOPED built in 2019 remains 75% empty because businesses halted their plans for expansion in 2020. 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Uncertain future. Financial support is eroding because of the pandemic. While SCOPED directly assisted over 20% of all Schuyler County businesses with employees (brought in over $1.7m in EIDL, PPP, Shared Work and Pandemic unemployment ), those businesses are struggling.
SCOPED built a shared production facility in 2019 for the growing breweries, wineries, etc. There is one tenant in the facility and the debt is $2mm. We are desperate to fill the remaining space or we will not make our debt payments.
How to maintain the level of service, provide managment & financial support to our businesses and assist them in diversifying, becoming more resilient and creating a stronger community.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Both our office manager and Executive Director are continuous learners and strong students. We are seeking knowledge, skills, and advice on how to best manage our looming issues – from the conceptual stage through implementation. I am hopeful for some insights for how best to modify our cost structure, work product, manage our debt, and create a long-term strategy for resiliency. This is not only for SCOPED, we would also take the key learnings and replicate them in our efforts with our small businesses & non-profits. If the strategies will work for SCOPED – they should also work for other organizations and small businesses. Once a month, we have a ZOOM call with all businesses and organizations in the county invited. We take a pulse of how each business is performing and concerns that they have. I expect this program will help us with long-term strategies for financial strength.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Judy McKinney Cherry, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

Back to List of Applicants

APPLICANT

Hope’s Place, Inc.

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: Yes – 0
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Hope’s Place, Inc.
Ashland, Boyd County, Kentucky 41101
606-585-1746
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Boyd
State (ARC Region) Kentucky


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Hope’s Place is a victim-focused Children’s Advocacy Center that provides a safe atmosphere for the victim, lessens trauma and promotes healing by maximizing services through a multi-disciplinary team approach.  Hope’s Place actively seeks to reduce the occurrence of sexual abuse and heighten awareness through prevention education.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

  1. Our non-profit utilizes local businesses and local resources as much as possible. We also provide free services to five counties in KY, Boyd, Carter, Elliott, Greenup and Lawrence counties.
  2. Our advocacy program helps families impacted by sexual and physical abuse, neglect and poverty. Our advocates provide wrap-around services to strengthen families and promote autonomy for children and families in our region. If  a child or family member needs a service that we don’t have available at our center we utilize our community partner relationships to get families and children the help they need.
  3. We don’t directly improve infrastructure but we do provide bus passes and tokens and cab vouchers to families that need assistance with transportation to appointments and to resources.
  4. Hope’s Place works closely with local resources in each of our FIVCO service counties and encourage our clients to utilize community resources and embrace their culture.
  5. Hope’s Place works closely with Ramey Estep, Pathways, Safe Harbor Domestic Violence Shelter, The Neighborhood, United Way, and many other agencies and community partners to collaborate on training initiatives, therapeutic group offerings, resources and other events to promote local communities and businesses and to encourage children and families to support local businesses and non-profits.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: Yes

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 14/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 12/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $935,000/$900,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $937,556 / $798,105

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $935,000 / $900,000

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From: Children’s Advocacy Centers of Kentucky   Date Received: Pending application decision
For What Purpose(s): PPE, COVID cleaning support, cleaning supplies, equipment and resources to support our switch to telehealth and a remote work force

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Hope’s Place has had to buy new equipment, new subscriptions and other things to switch our entire work force to virtual service provision when possible. We have continued to offer emergency forensic interviews, specialized sexual assault medical exams and crisis counseling sessions on-site which has required additional cleaning, additional supplies including PPE, additional laptops and tablets for remote trainings and telehealth sessions. We have added an on-site child care for employees that must work in the office when their kids are not in school due to COVID cases or for any remote learning situation. Hope’s Place has spent and anticipates spending thousands of dollars to continue uninterrupted services for the over 1,000 children and caregivers we serve each year.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Maintaining and sustaining current levels of service with the impending federal budget cuts anticipated in the fall and winter of 2020.
Providing and maintaining a safe environment for children, families and team members and being able to get necessary supplies and find funding to cover these additional expenses for an indefinite period of time.
Providing long-term sustainability for our center when so many things are unstable and unredictable.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

My goal is to learn as much as I can about sustainability, board development, team enhancement, short and/or long-term financial planning and any information that will allow us to serve children and families free of charge for decades to come. The opportunity to learn from this program is exciting and the program content seems very relevant to our current needs and our long-term goals.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Mission & Operations

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Lisa Phelps, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Washington County Museum of Fine Arts

Total Qualifying Score: 8
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Washington County Museum of Fine Arts
Hagerstown, Washington County, Maryland 21741
301-739-5727
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Washington
State (ARC Region) Maryland


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The Washington County Museum of Fine Arts provides a vibrant place for the presentation and exploration of art of lasting quality for the benefit of a diverse public, through intentional art collecting, lively interpretation, diligent preservation and care, active educational programs, and opportunities for social interaction. 

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

The Washington County Museum of Fine Arts is often described as a “hidden gem,” yet is undoubtedly a key cultural heritage asset in the four-state region, enhancing quality of life and providing vital arts education. Accredited by the American Alliance of Museums and open to the public since 1931, the museum is a cornerstone of the cultural life of this region, and prides itself on providing high-quality exhibitions and programs  comparable to those in much larger urban areas. Over nearly 90 years, thousands of children have benefited from free art classes and from curriculum-focused tours of the collection that use visual thinking strategies to teach critical analysis, build language and literacy skills, practice empathy, and learn more about the wider world. Free general admission provides barrier-free access to differing communities and socio-economic levels. The Museum is actively working towards increased diversity, equity, access and inclusion and has strengthened programming for diverse audiences over the last several years, with successful exhibitions like 2019’s  The Blues and the Abstract Truth, and a strong schedule in place for 2020-2021 that includes Old Master Italian paintings, as well as work exploring the legacy of the Underground Railroad by living contemporary artist Joseph Holston, and a groundbreaking exploration of the first documented African-American artist, Joshua Johnson. The work of the museum provides residents with vital arts and humanities experiences, while adding to the livability of the region for key employers and helping to attract potential development and talent to the area. The museum, through key partnerships with Washington County Public Schools and others, provides education on many levels–from art-making experiences with at-risk youth focusing on personal development to internships with young adults to develop 21st-century skills and contribute to the next generation of arts leaders.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 8/13 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 8/13 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $808,600/$1,324.964

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $1,271,594 / $1,410,634

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $808,600 / $1,324.964

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($9,175,378)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($170,900)
Received From: Payroll Protection Program (135,900); Maryland Heritage Area Authority (10,000); Washington County Rise Up (10,000); Maryland State Arts Council (15,000)   Date Received: 4/23, 6/16, 6/16, 6/30
For What Purpose(s): maintaining jobs and covering payroll, operational support, stabilization, and support for arts organizations

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Like most business and organizations in the eastern area of the country, the Museum closed on March 13 in order to prevent the spread of COVID-19, and remained closed until July 20. While the Museum does not charge general admission fees, institutional revenue was impacted because of the loss of associated program income (for classes, lectures and concerts) and the need to delay and reconfigure aspects of our program schedule.

The Museum closed during the highly anticipated annual Cumberland Valley Artists & Photographers Exhibition and was forced to mount its annual Washington County Public Schools Art Exhibition online. The Secret Paris of the 1930s: Vintage Photographs by Brassaï has been rescheduled for fall 2021. Other exhibitions and programs were also either delayed or rescheduled. Our monthly concerts in April and May were canceled.

Now that the museum has reopened we are seeing attendance at about 30-35% of pre-pandemic levels. Although we have, to an extent, successfully pivoted to online programming, some programs are more easily adaptable to online delivery than others. For example, our youth summer camp served 96 happy students online in August, but our June concert (which was broadcast live on Facebook) suffered from low-quality audio, although it has received 1700 views to-date.  

Financially the Museum anticipates that lost revenue will amount to about $71,000 from various income streams, including: lowered enrollment in classes, inability to host large public programs, a decline in donations caused by the economy, loss of facilities rentals, and decline in museum shop sales. During FY19, the Museum had 45,734 visitors from all 50 States, the District of Columbia and 27 foreign countries. Due to the MFA’s closure, the Museum lost one-third of its annual visitors and a large revenue source. The actual MFA visitor attendance for FY20 was 29,789.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Revenue shortfall
Reaching our audiences: continuing to adequately serve and support school students, connecting to regular visitors who are still not comfortable leaving their homes, reaching people with our exhibitions and collections.
How do we rise to this challenge dynamically, creatively, innovatively? Can we lead the field during this time of stasis? Can we consistently demonstrate or relevance and importance to the community? How do we do good work, important work, with less resources and less in person visitation?

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

As a new director, I am looking forward to this program as an immersion in thinking with other regional leaders–many of whom will know much more than I do about local resources. I think that the fundraising cohort will be particularly beneficial in terms of getting ideas for helping to deal with our revenue shortfall. The museum has been free to the public since 1931, I am proud of that and want to keep as much of our program available to everyone barrier-free as possible.  

The group conversations will, I suspect, help all of us with creative ideas for meeting service challenges as well–sharing techniques for reaching out to communities and forging meaningful connections with the resources we have available–whether that be a virtual connection or whether it means creating packages of art supplies that people can pick up at the museum, or creating programs that provide relevant connections to current circumstances. This connects to my third concern–trying to forge ahead with grace and strength and the right priorities. How can we really do our work if 70% of our audience is staying home? 

I also think that discussion with others will help us to get a better grasp on the new world we’ve been thrust in, in which m any organizations have had to jump into online work without the thought and deliberation that would occur in “normal times.” I attended a webinar last week that referred to this time as “a great re-set” in which old models for work would not be effective. The “re-set”  was seen as reflecting a new more conscious way of working with people, politics, and the planet as as priorities that nonprofits need to articulate and navigate. 


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Sarah Hall, Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Faith in Action of the Greater Kanawha Valley, Inc.

Total Qualifying Score: 6
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $100,000 to $250,000 – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Faith in Action of the Greater Kanawha Valley, Inc.
Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia 25339
304-881-7253
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Kanawha
State (ARC Region) West Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

THE MISSION of Faith in Action of the Greater Kanawha Valley is to support the independent living of older adults in the communities we serve by lending a helping hand, neighbor to neighbor.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Our organization increases the health of its senior resident to succeed in Appalachia by providing a set of core services that empower them to age in place, overcoming obstacles like the lack of transportation so they can access the critical healthcare they need, and have reliable access to groceries on a regular basis. Our organization utilizes volunteers of all ages, including a growing number of young adult leaders, building both their capacity to serve and their skills in advancing community health and well-being.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $136,500/$134,870

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $116,863 / $100,708

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $136,500 / $134,870

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($7,800)
Received From: PPP via Truist   Date Received: 5/5/2020
For What Purpose(s): Payroll

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Some funding we rely on annually has been diverted to COVID-19 specific causes, although we have also been the beneficiary of COVID-19 response grants from new and traditional funders. We were forced to cancel our two signature fundraisers for 2020, which was a significant blow to our income/revenue. 

While we have made some adjustments to existing programs and adapted new ones in light of the pandemic, we have never stopped serving our seniors. Our doors never closed. We had, and still have, some of our base volunteers who are reluctant to provide direct assistance, which is absolutely understandable, but that has not impacted our overall ability to make sure our older neighbors have the help they need.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Volunteer recruitment, although this is a constant concern/challenge.
Funding in terms of long-term sustainability. We are in okay shape today; my worries center around how this will impact our financial story one year from now, or two years from now.
Development of a financial strategic plan. Our fund development process is largely a “seat of the pants” operation; not completely, but we definitely need to educate our organization in development planning.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

I am hopeful participation will give us insight and understanding on building a “realistic and actionable Development (i.e. fundraising) Plan capable of providing sustained and scalable support for your organization.”


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 B: 5-Week Course (Mar. 1, 2021-April 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Jennifer Waggener, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Infinity Visual and Performing Arts Inc

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Infinity Visual and Performing Arts Inc
Jamestown, Chautauqua County, New York 14701
716-664-0991
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Chautauqua
State (ARC Region) New York


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Infinity Visual and Performing Arts Inc. creates and sustains an environment in which young people, based solely on their desire to participate can grow, learn, and lead through active participation in the visual and performing arts. 

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Infinity aligns with goals four and five.

through hands-on active participation in the visual and performing arts young people involved at the Infinity Center learn hard and soft skills that prepare them to be both involved and valuable future community members. 

Infinity strengthens our community by empowering young people to use their time in positive and creative ways, connect with adult mentors who care about their future, and become the best versions of themselves. 

The arts are a uniting factor, and can lead the way for community growth, connectedness, and development. 

Infinity’s staff members are always looking for ways to grow and to move our organization a step ahead every day.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 5/39 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 5/39 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $490585/$490585

Q6. Fiscal Year: October-September

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $519752 / $518259

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $490585 / $490585

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($68,000)
Received From: Payroll Protection Program   Date Received: April 15, 2020
For What Purpose(s): Staff and Instructor Payroll

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Due to COVID we saw a drastic decrease in student enrollment in early 2020, but Infinity still provided 6,500 private lessons and 1,117 group lessons were experienced by our students when all other youth-based organizations in our area completely halted operations. Infinity forged ahead, and felt that a connection to an adult mentor coupled with healthy outlet for stress and emotions during a time of upheaval was the type of positive outlet that our students needed during this time. Additionally, all scheduled fundraisers were cancelled for 2020, resulting in losses of approximately $110,000. 

Infinity began our new program year on Sept 1, 2020 approximately 40% lower in student enrollment than previous years. Unique, new  marketing techniques that highlight digital learning options as well as new digital fundraising ideas will be crucial to Infinity’s success in the coming year.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Student Enrollment
Fundraising
Keeping staff and instructors working

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Infinity’s small but tenacious staff runs 13 to 15 fundraising events each year. All of these have historically been in person fundraising events, and Infinity’s development and marketing team will need to pivot and learn and use new, efficient, and effective digital fundraising tools/resources in the coming year to align our organizational goals with actionable fundraising techniques for a new era.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Stephanie Rogers, Grants and Marketing Coordinator

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Foundation for Appalachian Kentucky

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Foundation for Appalachian Kentucky
HAZARD, Perry County, Kentucky 41701-0000
606-439-1357
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Perry
State (ARC Region) Kentucky


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

A catalyst for community collaboration and charitable giving; building capacity and creating permanent , locally controlled community assets as sustainable resources to improve quality of life and place in southeastern Kentucky.A catalyst for community collaboration and charitable giving; building capacity and creating permanent , locally controlled community assets as sustainable resources to improve quality of life and place in southeastern Kentucky.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

The Foundation for Appalachian Kentucky was created by people committed to removing barriers and promoting opportunities for people and communities to thrive.   Since inception, our strategies have prioritized investment rather than charity, targeting money and resources in ways that expand opportunity for business and growth, with a goal of increased sustainability and capacity within our communities to create solutions and to leverage the resources.  We are beginning to see working solutions emerge across multiple counties, putting self-determination and opportunity back in the hands of the people who live here.  Solidly grounded in and with communities of people committed to tackling complex social problems, the Foundation for Appalachian Kentucky is a nontraditional community foundation with roots in rural economic development serving a high need, under resourced region of the country.  We consistently adhere to these three core strategies:

  1. We build community – We engage in community building that promotes the development of our communities as places of bold opportunity for all children and families.
  2. We build capacity – We are developing a stable, locally based regional organization anchored in Perry County, KY and promoting local identity with regional vision across all of Eastern Kentucky.
  3. We build assets – We promote asset building through community philanthropy and investment capital as powerful tools for community development and to provide for flexibility and focus on long term impact.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 8/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 7/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $900,000/$924,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $1,442,162 / $960,174

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $900,000 / $924,000

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($103,100)
Received From: Paycheck Protection Program   Date Received: May 1, 2020
For What Purpose(s): Payroll

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

We are a relationship based business, providing infrastructure that provides infrastructure for philanthropic capital to flow into the region.  Being unable to travel, network and attend conferences, have business meetings and “pitch” opportunities for high net worth individuals and foundations outside of our region has severely impacted our ability to raise operating funds to maintain the infrastructure.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Operating cash on hand – we have less than 6 months on hand.
Inability to connect with donors and investors,
That the market will crash due to economic uncertainty.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

I’d like some help thinking/learning about how to access funding opportunities without being able to network with people.  Beyond government grants, I really only have experience with relationship based fundraising with foundations and high net worth individuals.  How can those of us who are in rural, remote, isolated communities get access to the people we need to be talking to?


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? Yes

List of Organizations in Proposed Cohort:
Appalachian Early Childhood Network
Appalachian Arts Alliance
Housing Development Alliance

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Gerry Roll Roll, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Steuben County Habitat for Humanity

Total Qualifying Score: 7
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: Yes – 0
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Steuben County Habitat for Humanity
Corning, Steuben County, New York 14830
607-936-4444
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Steuben
State (ARC Region) New York


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Seeking to put God’s love into action, Habitat for Humanity brings people together to build homes, community and hope.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Our organization aligns in many ways with building capacity and skills.  Habitat for Humanity, as spelled out in our mission statement, is very strongly focused on building community.  Our specific affiliate takes that charter to a whole new level.  We believe very strongly that we can serve more and serve better if we come together.  Collaborations are key to our success.  We invest in the broader community by co-chairing non-profit roundtables, serving on state and national committees and actively participating in advocacy efforts with the goal of strengthening and advancing our community.  We believe that community transformation and change is a ground up effort that starts with the leaders coming together and working together.  

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: Yes

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 11/2 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 11/2 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $350000/$300000

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $369000 / $469000

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $350000 / $300000

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($10000)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($75000)
Received From: Corning Federal Credit Union   Date Received: May 1, 2020
For What Purpose(s): PPP

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

We were impacted in all aspects of our business.  We had a house ready to sell to a homebuyer and the sale was stalled due to delays in the real estate sector.  This means we sit on all the expenses of building a home and are not able to realize the income.  Our retail store, ReStore, was shut down as well.  ReStore accounts for about 35% of our overall income and basically funds our operations.  Between the two, we lost about 75% of our revenue over a six month period.  Even though we have re-opened, we are still reeling not only financially but also in personnel.  We have kept everyone on shared work while we try to recover.  

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
I am unsure that we will be able to recover financially.
I worry about someone contracting Covid and how to handle that.
I worry that the financial strain will ultimately end in a closure of our affiliate.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

The pandemic has changed our fiscal management practices drastically.  We went from planning for the future to worrying about tomorrow.  Shifting gears to this new way of looking at our finances has been very difficult and there was certainly no training for this.  I still feel like we are learning as we go.  I think that these special circumstances require a whole new approach to fiscal management and retraining for the new set of norms we are faced with.  Learning best practices and strategies will certainly help us better manage our finances not only for today but for tomorrow and beyond.  My goal is to not only stay afloat but to be better poised for the future so events like this have less of a financial impact on our organization.  This program would help me achieve that goal.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Short-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Lisa Caracci, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Ready, Set, Grow Child Care Center

Total Qualifying Score: 8
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Ready, Set, Grow Child Care Center
Corning, Steuben County, New York 14830
607-962-0599
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Steuben
State (ARC Region) New York


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Building a stronger tomorrow through nurturing today.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Ready, Set, Grow Child Care Center aligns with goal number 2.  We increase the education, knowledge, skills, and health of residents to work and succeed in Appalachia. We do this in two ways.  First, we educate, nurture, and care for the next generation of youth; children ages 6 weeks to 5 years old.  We are accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children which means many of our standards exceed New York State Office of Children and Family Services regulations.  We care for the whole child including their health, education, physical, social, and emotional development. 

The second way we align with goal 2 is that we are a community of friends and families that form strong bonds. Our teachers partner with parents to nurture and guide each child’s development.  We educate parents on developmentally appropriate practice, important milestones, and services available within the community.  Knowing their children are safe and very well cared for, parents are able to work effectively and succeed in Appalachia.  They can effectively concentrate on their career goals and job performance knowing their children are happy and have high quality child care.  

 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 16/21 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 15/26 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $920,339/$1,054,374

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $1,032,954 / $1,009,109

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $920,339 / $1,054,374

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($204,675)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($$145,000)
Received From: Chemung Canal Trust Company – SBA PPP Loan   Date Received: 4/20/20
For What Purpose(s): Operating costs. Unknown how much will have to be repaid

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

COVID-19 has decreased our tuition drastically. During the lockdown months, many families decided to take their children out of child care and our tuition dropped. We are still struggling to increase tuition as the local uptick in cases is causing families to again decide to keep their children home.  While our tuition is lower, our staffing costs have increased. Due to COVID-19 restrictions, parents are no longer allowed into the program. We have had to hire extra staff to escort children to and from their parents at drop off and pick up.  Other increases in expenses include health and safety supplies such as bleach, rubbing alcohol, thermometers, and personal protective equipment.  

In addition to the items mentioned above, we also have not been able to fundraise. We normally have an event in the fall.  We were not able to solicit donations and sponsorships in the spring due to the lockdown.  COVID-19 restrictions still prohibit gatherings such as the fundraising event we had planned.  

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Decreased enrollment
Increased staffing costs
The COVID-19 virus itself

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Our organization needs a fund development plan. We need to think outside the box and bring in philanthropical funds over and above tuition in order to survive.  This program will help leadership form goals and map out a fund development plan to assist us in getting through the pandemic and to thrive for years to come.  


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Short-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Colleen Coro Coro, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

PA Coalition for Oral Health

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): No
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

PA Coalition for Oral Health
Delmont, Other County, Pennsylvania 15626
724-972-7242
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Other
State (ARC Region) Pennsylvania


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

To improve oral health for all Pennsylvanians by uniting stakeholders to advance advocacy, policy, education and innovative approaches.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Our organization, PA Coalition for Oral Health (PCOH) aligns with and addresses ARC goals 2 and 5.

Our vision is “Essential to overall health and wellness, optimal oral health benefits ALL Pennsylvanians. By bringing together oral health advocates and professionals to share the best and most innovative approaches, PCOH serves as the dynamic leading voice to improve oral health across the Commonwealth. ” We seek to increase the education, knowledge, skills, and health of residents to work and succeed in Pennsylvania by increasing the health literacy of Pennsylvanians so that they understand the importance of oral health to overall health. We build the capacity and skills of current and next-generations leaders and organizations to innovate, collaborate, and advance community and economic development through innovative oral health workforce development initiatives, convening multi-disciplinary stakeholder groups for facilitated discussion around common goals, and advocating for policy and infrastructure that support optimal oral health.

Poor oral health can result not only in pain, infection, and systemic health issues like diabetes and heart disease, but it also can have social and economic consequences. A child with mouth pain will not be able to pay attention in class and may fall behind their contemporaries in school and have fewer opportunities for advancement. Missing or discolored teeth may hinder a qualified person from being employed to their full potential.
Lack of access to oral health care in a region, county, or community makes it less attractive to businesses and/or professionals considering where to develop their business or start their career.

Oral health matters at the individual, community, regional, and population levels. PCOH takes a multi-pronged approach to address it at all levels.

 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 3/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 3/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $979,638/$936,605

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $745,497 / $694,633

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $979,638 / $936,605

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($3,000)
Received From: EIDL Advance   Date Received: 5/4/2020
For What Purpose(s): emergency assistance

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

COVID-19 has had a significant impact on our activities. As a statewide coalition and advocacy organization, we frequently travel to meet with stakeholders in all regions of the state. When travel and gatherings were restricted last spring, we cancelled all in-person convenings, including our biennial State Oral Health Conference that was to take place over several days in November of 2020. As much as possible, we converted meetings and presentations to a virtual format, and developed innovative solutions to meet project deliverables by alternate means. Our small staff was stretched thin handling an increased workload with labor-intensive alternatives to in-person events and exponential growth in requests from our stakeholders for evidence-based information. Despite some serendipitous outcomes of new methods of working, we have found that they cannot replace the value of person-to-person conversation.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Increase in workload
Need to build organizational capacity
Effects of changing political environment on healthcare and on our work

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

While we feel fortunate not to be financially reliant solely on in-person programming and events, we recognize that we need to diversify our funding sources both to sustain our current level of work, and to expand our capacity to take on emerging issues. We hope that participation in this program will help us broaden and deepen our relationships with funders and identify new sources of support whose priorities and goals align with ours.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Merrilynn Marsh, Development and Special Projects Coordinator

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Sprouting Farms Corp

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Sprouting Farms Corp
Talcott, Summers County, West Virginia 24981
757-749-2683
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Summers
State (ARC Region) West Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Sprouting Farms seeks to develop new and existing farm businesses and increase local food production in Central Appalachia by laying the groundwork for sustainable farm businesses. ​

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

  1. We train beginning/aspiring farmers to help them start their sustainable farm businesses.
  2. Education and skill development to our beginning farmers and also through community workshops around food production, seasonal food preparation, sustainable food system development, etc
  3. Appalachia has an agricultural heritage, and we are working to retain and re-enliven that heritage and knowledge within this region through our farmer training program and regional food hub development.
  4. We collaborate with universities and high schools to host middle through college-age students for experiential learning on our production farm, FDA processing facility, and across the Turnrow food hub network.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 16/2 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 11/5 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $1876005/$1787955

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $648307 / $694381

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $1876005 / $1787955

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($92692.50)
Received From: PPP and EIDL Advance – My board did not approve taking the EID Loan though the application is on hold, and we are discussing it as an option still   Date Received: 4/23/20 4/27/20
For What Purpose(s): Payroll and operational expenses. We continued to operate (and at a higher tempo) to meet community food needs, but we could not do much of the grant funded project work planned for spring and summer 2020 due to CoVid.

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

At the Sprouting Farms education and production farm, we had to delay our 2020 beginning farmer apprentice cohort. we were forced to cancel community events which are focused on connecting our local community to the local food system work we are doing in Central Appalachia – seasonal cooking classes, garden planning, farm volunteer days, etc. Many of our ARC POWER projects were delayed including site build outs on two new education and production farms due to public and staff safety concerns. Our food hub, Turnrow Appalachian Farm Collective, experienced a surge in new retail and wholesale customers and food access demands across the state. We had to increase the operational tempo with very little unrestricted funding to meet these immediate community needs. We shuffled around staff from other divisions to help support this increased demand and made multiple adjustments within our Sprouting Farms Corp management of Turnrow as well as with other Turnrow partners.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Staff health safety – They are continuing to operate to meet community food needs but are in contact with multiple people on a weekly basis and at risk of becoming exposed to the Coronavirus
Continuing to financially support increased operational needs while also planning for long term sustainability
Fundraising

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

We are a young nonprofit. And while we have had great success in our mission since inception in 2016, we have a lot of work to develop a long term sustainability plan. I hope that this program can help us in our efforts for long term financial management planning and fundraising so that we can continue to do this needed work as long as necessary.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: April Koenig, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Seneca Lake Wine Trail

Total Qualifying Score: 10
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Seneca Lake Wine Trail
Watkins Glen, Schuyler County, New York 14891
607-535-8080
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Schuyler
State (ARC Region) New York


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

To develop a spirit of cooperation between members of the association to develop an outstanding wine-producing
and tourism area.
To promote the wineries of the Seneca Lake Winery Association.
To stimulate interest in wine in general and the wines of Seneca Lake, specifically.
To gain recognition of the SLWA as an independent leader in the grape growing, wine and tourism initiatives.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

The Seneca Lake Winery Association, doing business as the Seneca Lake Wine Trail is responsible for the support, education, and promotion of its 30-member wineries on the Seneca Lake Wine Trail. We align with numbers 1, 2, 4, and 5 of the ARC strategic plan goals specifically in the following ways:

  • Goal #1: Our members pool their resources in the form of membership dues. The Association then invests and connects with other larger organizations such as Wine America, the NY Wine and Grape Foundation, and the Wine Origins Alliance, to connect wineries with business development to strengthen our local, regional, and state economy.
  • Goals #2 and 5: Increase the education, knowledge, skills, and health of residents to work and succeed in Appalachia. We provide educational opportunities including webinars and in-person seminars; we share marketing and business support. Prior to COVID-19, we were building a connection with the next generation through a mentorship program, run by our local chamber of commerce. We also position the wine industry on Seneca Lake as a high visibility, year-round opportunity for employment, to attract current and future residents to stay here or relocate to the region.
  • Goal #4: It doesn’t get much more natural than grapes and vineyards here in the Finger Lakes, and everything we do leverages the tremendous natural assets including the land, water, beautiful views, and unique terroir of Seneca Lake.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(6)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $206,000/$405603

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $$806,056 / $704,841

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $206,000 / $405603

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

As an organization that relies nearly exclusively on ticket sales to special events, we have lost nearly all of our income for the majority of 2020 and likely, for a substantial portion (if not all) of 2021. We are working hard to refocus our efforts and explore new revenue streams, but making that change does not happen quickly especially in an organization that has been drawing income from one primary source for over 3 decades.

We are incredibly lucky to have predecessors who were phenomenal stewards of the organization’s finances, so we are safe, operationally, for at least the next year, but we also know we need to continue spending to keep visitors coming our doors. Despite having a reserve in the form of investments and even by trimming expenses, we cannot rely on our investment accounts infinitely nor do we want to deplete them without some other form of revenue to replenish the funds.

In addition to providing substantial

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
The inability to host large special events as we have in the past and the loss of income and visitation those events generated.
The ability of our wineries to weather the storm. If tasting rooms are shut down again, surviving the winter when they can’t use their outdoor space, and so on – these are all major challenges for wineries.
The unpredictability of the situation and lack of advance warning to businesses when it comes to shut downs, restrictions, and so on.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

I am especially interested in the short and long term financial management portions, as well as the fundraising portions of the program. As the Executive Director, I am eager to equip myself with any and all knowledge available to help our organization weather this storm and not just survive, but thrive.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 B: 5-Week Course (Mar. 1, 2021-April 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Brittany Gibson Gibson, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

My Place: A Play and Learning Center

Total Qualifying Score: 10
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

My Place: A Play and Learning Center
Montour Falls, Schuyler County, New York 14865
607-481-3570
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Schuyler
State (ARC Region) New York


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

To be the pillar of childcare in Schuyler County by providing children and
families with quality care and educational experiences.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

We strive to provide quality child care to working families in Schuyler County so they can continue pursing professional or educational goals to enhance Schuyler County’s economic growth. 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 9/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 15/3 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $508022/$585741

Q6. Fiscal Year: October-September

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $341690 / $451907

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $508022 / $585741

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Our center had to close our doors for a few months in Spring 2020.  When we reopened our enrollment was low.  We have had significantly more staff turn over as many people have conflicting schedules with families or live with individuals in a high risk category.  

We operated a before and after school program located in the public school, which shut its doors when schools closed.  We were unable to reopen this school year because the school could not spare the space that we used due to their new restrictions.  

 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
We are moving into a new space February 2021. Will we generate enough income to pay for this?
Our staff members are exhausted and worked closely with small children and families. How do we keep them from becoming ill?
Employee recruitment efforts have not been fruitful. How can we find people who are willing to reenter the workforce?

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

We are looking for connection and inspiration.  We are the only licensed child care center in the county and without reliable childcare families may have to travel to other communities for employment since they would need to go there for childcare anyway. 

We are looking for ways to strengthen our workforce through training opportunities and career growth to retain staff and give the center consistency.  


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Mission & Operations

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Kristine Morseman, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

PA Wilds Center for Entrepreneurship, Inc.

Total Qualifying Score: 7
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $1.5 million up to $3 million – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

PA Wilds Center for Entrepreneurship, Inc.
Russell, Warren County, Pennsylvania 16345
814-449-8941
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Warren
State (ARC Region) Pennsylvania


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The PA Wilds Center’s mission is to integrate conservation and economic development to strengthen and inspire rural communities in the Pennsylvania Wilds. PA Wilds Center is the state’s external lead nonprofit for the PA Wilds Conservation Landscape, a collaborative effort that aims to grow nature and heritage tourism across the 13-county PA Wilds region to create jobs, diversify local economies, inspire stewardship and improve quality of life. In this role, the Center works with local, state and national partners to help coordinate outreach and investments in the landscape-level PA Wilds strategy by a wide variety of public and private-sector partners. PA Wilds Center manages all of the PA Wilds programs, services and platforms to benefit communities and businesses; and houses core stakeholder structures tied to the regional strategy, such as the PA Wilds Planning Team, a 50-plus member group created in 2006 under a ground-breaking Intergovernmental Cooperation Agreement. The Center’s work is sustained through partnerships, program fees, philanthropic giving, grants, and entrepreneurial activities related to the Pennsylvania Wilds brand.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Among its most visible work, PA Wilds Center has established and is scaling an entrepreneurial ecosystem to incubate creativity and innovation and marshal resources and connections to help rural entrepreneurs succeed.
The PA Wilds entrepreneurial ecosystem is built around a place-based brand, the Pennsylvania Wilds, a designated tourism region of Pennsylvania known for its public lands, outdoor experiences, maker culture, stewardship ethic and rural lifestyle. The ecosystem is rooted in the larger PA Wilds Conservation Landscape, a 15-year partnership effort that is helping revitalize the 13-county PA Wilds region by growing nature tourism to create jobs, inspire stewardship, diversify local economies and improve quality of life. Our ecosystem includes several components:  
A trademarked logo and brand licensed in ways that support the brand’s values, rural businesses and communities, and the mission of the PA Wilds Center; 
Destination and lifestyle marketing to drive physical and online visitation to the region and support stewardship messaging (pawilds.com, related social media channels, media placements); 
A network of businesses and organizations involved in the PA Wilds products/experience, called The Wilds Cooperative of PA (WildsCoPA.org), and resources to help this network succeed (including referrals to PA’s robust business service provider network, business-to-business referrals, etc.);
Regional commerce infrastructure to help rural entrepreneurs in The Wilds Cooperative access markets and to address gaps in visitor capacity (includes brick-and-mortar PA Wilds Conservation Shops and a soon-to-launch online PA Wilds-branded marketplace). This commerce infrastructure includes a charity checkout campaign that raises funds for PA Wilds state park/forest improvements (state parks/forests are a major visitor draw in the PA Wilds).
A PA Wilds Media Lab, a business accelerator with tools, technologies and classroom space to support this ecosystem and the hundreds of entrepreneurs currently involved (opens 2022).
Our place-based brand has applications related to visitation, small business development, product development, workforce, conservation, stewarding and enhancing community character, building pride of place and population retention.
Our entrepreneurial ecosystem creates the tools, technologies, processes, systems and relationships that allow a wide variety of stakeholders to take action across these applications. All parts of the ecosystem are built to reinforce the others.   
This ecosystem has winning results that include community participation in the ecosystem, business start-ups and expansions, job creation, increased sales of rural products and services, stewardship giving, regional visitor spending, and website visitation. 
With all of the major parts of the ecosystem identified and successfully piloted, the Center is now working to scale the ecosystem from one unit of the Conservation Shop to six units, launching an online marketplace for rural entrepreneurs to sell directly to consumers under the PA Wilds brand, beefing up marketing efforts, and growing business participation in the ecosystem.  
If the Center is able to achieve its goals, its projections show that over the next 20 years, this ecosystem will: 

Move more than $30M in local products and services, helping rural entrepreneurs access new markets and thrive
Have more than 2000 rural business and community partners participating
Create 1300 jobs
Raise more than $2M for conservation through charity checkout campaigns (for reinvestment in PA Wilds state parks and forests)
Serve 25M visitors

This ecosystem work directly advances ARC’s Goals 1, 4 and 5 across a large, 13-county swath of Northern Appalachia. ARC is a longtime partner in the PA Wilds effort. It has invested in the PA Wilds Center directly through grants and also funded aligned projects alongside it that advance the regional PA Wilds strategy. The Center’s EVP of Operations, Abbi Peters, is participating in the 2021 Appalachian Leadership Institute.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 6/9 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 5/9 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $1,440,0847.95/$1,507,546.08

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $1,507,546.08 / $707,578.26

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $1,440,0847.95 / $1,507,546.08

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

PA Wilds Center has from its founding pursued a braided revenue strategy. This approach has definitely helped the nonprofit weather storms, including COVID-19. That said, we took some hits. These include:
As part of our entrepreneurial ecosystem, PA Wilds Center operates brick-and-mortar gift shops selling all local products at select state parks in the region. These shops hit multiple mission marks for us and are also an important revenue stream that supports our operation across a highly rural landscape the size of Massachusetts. We had to close our gift shop operations during COVID for a period of months due to state mandates, resulting in lost revenues. Since re-opening, revenues are strong but not as strong as projected due to limitations on the number of customers that can be in our shops at a given time. In addition, we lost some anticipated state grant funding that for many years has supported the small business development aspects of our mission.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Funding
Keeping staff safe and healthy (this is actually more important than funding but the risk is lower, so we put it at #2)
Uncertainty about how COVID will impact our nonprofit’s operations in future, as well as our value chain of small rural businesses.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

We don’t have control over a lot of things in this pandemic, but one thing we do have control over is how we prepare and respond. To us, taking the Fundraising course through ARC’s Nonprofit Resource Center is a great way to prepare for future uncertainty. Creating a Development Plan has been on our to-do list, but as a young nonprofit we have not yet been able to tackle it. Now is a great time to do that, especially given that this course would connect us to experts and a peer group to help guide and support our effort.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 B: 5-Week Course (Mar. 1, 2021-April 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Julie Iaquinto, EVP Finance

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Mountain Empire Community College Foundation

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Mountain Empire Community College Foundation
Big Stone Gap, Wise County, Virginia 24219
423-230-0207
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Wise
State (ARC Region) Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The MECC Foundation, Inc., is a non-profit organization that supports the mission of Mountain Empire Community College in Big Stone Gap, Virginia. Foundation projects include scholarships, faculty and staff development and recognition programs, cultural programs and events, campus improvements, educational programs, and other projects.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

2. Increase the education, knowledge, skills, and health of resident to work and succeed in Appalachia. 

5. Build the capacity and skills of current and next-generation leaders and organizations to innovate, collaborate, and advance community and economic development. 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 3/2 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 3/2 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $1,369,281/$1,369,281

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $$1,375,134 / $$1,375,134

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $1,369,281 / $1,369,281

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($1,369,281)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

The MECC Foundation was unable to hold the majority of our planned fundraisers for 2020, resulting in an expected loss of $100,000 in income. The Foundation’s operating and program budget is based on a three-year rolling average of market returns. With the fluctuations in the market, due to COVID-19 and the upcoming election, it is unclear if the Foundation’s ability to award scholarships will be impacted in 2021-2022. 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
The ability to fund scholarships fully that allow students to complete needed training and career preparation.
The long-term ability to raise funds in a time of uncertainty.
The loss of connection to our community due to loss of public events and working at home.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

I am seeking strategies for resilience during uncertain financial times, and to gain insight from other organizations experiencing the same challenges. Our Foundation/College has also secured past support from ARC to assist with funding much needed and innovative training programs. I would hope this program will address potential grant and funding sources where additional financial support could be accessed. 


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Short-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 B: 5-Week Course (Mar. 1, 2021-April 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Amy Greear Greear, Executive Director, Vice President of Institutional Advancement

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Tuscarawas Arts Partnership

Total Qualifying Score: 4
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : No (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Tuscarawas Arts Partnership
DOVER, Tuscarawas County, Ohio 44622
330-432-2895
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Tuscarawas
State (ARC Region) Ohio


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The mission of Tuscarawas Arts Partnership (TAP) is to create and support environments that awaken, empower and inspire through the arts in Tuscarawas County.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

TAP aligns with several of the above goals.

The first goal aligns with TAP’s ArtsThrive Program which is a series of business and professional development workshops geared toward the arts, culture and creative sector. The goal of the program is to equip artists, cultural organizations and creative businesses with business development tools and resources to help their creative journey thrive.

The fourth goal also aligns with TAP’s mission to coordinate opportunities for the arts, culture and creative sector to become collaborative agents for community and economic development whether it’s through public art projects or supporting community arts events.

The fifth goal is another objective TAP is striving towards. As TAP’s mission and services continues to grow, TAP wants to establish opportunities for creative leadership and innovation in the advancement of economic development, community engagement and collaboration in the arts.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 0/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 0/1 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $11,000.00/$17,000.00

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $15,214.30 / $16,572.45

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $11,000.00 / $17,000.00

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($1,874.00)
Received From: Blue Vine   Date Received: August 3, 2020
For What Purpose(s): Payroll Protection Program

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Our ability to fundraise and receive donations have been greatly impacted. We are a new, small nonprofit that established its 501c3 status May 2018. Since then, we’ve been growing our donor base, services and programs. When COVID hit, our donations took a hit. In previous years, we’ve operated with a budget of less than $20,000. This year, we were hoping to raise between $25,000 – $30,000. We have written countless grants and reached out to many local businesses and members of the community to support our nonprofit. As a new nonprofit (even before COVID), this posed a challenge.

Not only is our arts agency affected locally, but the rest of the arts, culture and creative sector in Tuscarawas County has taken a hit. TAP organized a study to assess the impact of COVID on the arts, culture and creative community. Between the months of March – August 2020, the arts, culture and creative sector in Tuscarawas County has lost $1.2 million in revenue – and the number keeps growing each month with little help or guidance.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
How to grow my donor base as a new organization (even prior to COVID, we had this challenge given how new we were). Now it’s even more challenging.
Will our arts, culture and creative sector see any relief in our community
How can the arts continue to operate and grow if they are deemed the last to open in the re-opening plan

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

TAP is a local arts agency that serves the arts, culture and creative community in Tuscarawas County. It is important for us to have a voice in this time to encourage creativity in our community while expressing our needs to get through the pandemic. 


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Short-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Wilma Mullet, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Toccoa-Stephens County Chamber of Commerce

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: Yes – 0
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Toccoa-Stephens County Chamber of Commerce
Toccoa, Stephens County, Georgia 30577
706-886-2132
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Stephens
State (ARC Region) Georgia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Our mission is always to serve, promote, and protect every member of the Chamber of Commerce in order to help them grow and prosper.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

The two goals which clearly coincide with our work at The Chamber would be the following:

  1. Strengthen Appalachia’s community and economic development potential by leveraging the Region’s natural and cultural heritage assets. We live in such a beautiful part of the country packed with rich history which are obvious assets to tout. The Toccoa-Stephens County Chamber oversees the responsibility of Tourism through the management of our Regional Visitor Information Center. In doing so, our big focus is natural and cultural heritage from Toccoa Falls hiking trails, Lake Hartwell fishing and outdoor activities to Traveler’s Rest, Currahee Military Museum, Camp Toccoa @ Currahee where all the WWII Paratroopers trained. The invitation for others to come experience Toccoa-Stepehns County and bring their business to call this home is always on the forefront with us.
  2. Build the capacity and skills of current and next-generation leaders and organizations to innovate, collaborate, and advance community and economic development. We oversee our Leadership Toccoa-Stephens County Program. Strong leadership is an essential ingredient in the continuing development of a community. Leadership Toccoa-Stephens County, sponsored by the Toccoa-Stephens County Chamber of Commerce, provides existing and emerging business leaders with unique opportunities to enhance their civic knowledge of Stephens County, to sharpen their leadership skills and to connect with leaders from across the community. This program has provided participants a better understanding of how our community works, opportunity to build relationships with the region’s leaders and inspiration to use their talents to serve the community and encourage economic growth.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(6)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: Yes

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $188120/$188120

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $261282 / $227716

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $188120 / $188120

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

As the Chamber of Commerce we have had to adjust and fine tune our position since the pandemic hit to remain the “goto resource” for our local business community. All of a sudden the world looked different and we were the source of calm and reassurance through offering helpful and relevant  resources, encouragement and collaboration, the glue to help draw together, connect and keep the community strong. The pandemic has challenged us all and taught us much in the process. The direct impact to us has been financial. We are accustomed to hosting both socially and financially successful community events. Of course the normalcy of gathering together came to an immediate halt. Without warning, our game changed.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Fifty percent of our normal operating is based on non-member dues revenue. My concern is how best to anticipate and budget accordingly. Our Hotel/Motel Tax dollars have been drastically impacted in ways which may now change the revenue stream to our Chamber forever. Looking for ways to adjust yet still maintain our level of excellence in all we do.
The uncertainty of furture events and the financial support they bring makes it challenging to plan. We are now looking daily for fresh reliable and creative ways to work around this challenge.
Our goal is to be the most powerful small business resource on the planet for our members. Be relevant. Some good old Chamber things which have “always been done this way” may no longer be valuable and need to be let go.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

It is my hope to find fresh new ideas and how to best incorporate change to help us plan accordingly for our continued future success for our Chamber and for our local business community.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Julie Paysen, President

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Ducktown Basin Museum

Total Qualifying Score: 6
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : No (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $100,000 to $250,000 – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Ducktown Basin Museum
Ducktown, Polk County, Tennessee 37326
423-496-5778
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Polk
State (ARC Region) Tennessee


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The purpose of Ducktown Basin Museum is the preservation and interpretation of the cultural and industrial heritage of this copper mining region of  Southern Appalachia, along with the history of the environmental impact of the operations and the remediation efforts.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Ducktown Basin Museum works closely with Glen Springs Holding and Copperhill Industries, these companies are a vital role in the future of our area. Throughout my career I have been involved closely with all local government within our three-state region. Polk County TN lies within the eastern corner of the state we are within three miles to Fannin County GA and five miles to Cherokee County NC, I have always been very hands on with small business development and economic development issues. (Fannin County and Polk County Chamber of Commerce)  I simply need more contacts and skill set to continue the work that I have accomplished, I feel that with your assistance/guidance  I can do that.  DBM has preserved so much of the history for our area and now I want to take all of that information to teach and guide as many as possible.  I have been working closely with Ellijay Telephone Company (one our area tv, internet, phone service provider) to run the fiber optic line on to our beautiful event center and office that I have been spending a lot of time on since coming on board in January.

 

 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/3 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $70,000.00/$90,000.00

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $104218.56 / $111876.81

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $70,000.00 / $90,000.00

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($50,000)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($0)
Received From: N/A   Date Received: N/A
For What Purpose(s): N/A

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Our little rural town is solely based on tourism. DBM staff consist of  myself and two ladies that are in their mid 70’s and their life story  is huge part of our museum tour since they lived the life back in the day with their family in the area. We have been closed to the public since March 18, 2020 with zero daily income, and very limited membership and event center income.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Funding
Health Impact of staff when we reopen
Winterize our Event Center

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

I am a vessel of knowledge and strength like no other. I simply want and need more knowledge and funds to continue the work that still needs to take place in this community and region, I feel that can be accomplished with your assistance.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Sarah Mickens Mickens, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Blount County Economic Development Council, Inc.

Total Qualifying Score: 6
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $100,000 to $250,000 – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Blount County Economic Development Council, Inc.
Oneonta, Blount County, Alabama 35121
205-625-3305
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Blount
State (ARC Region) Alabama


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The BCEDC is a cohesion of citizens united under the common goal of maximizing our resources while advancing a strong, vibrant economy.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

The BCEDC’s purpose and activities align with ARC Goals 1, 3 and 4 by supporting the recruitment, retention and expansion of new and current businesses in Blount County, Alabama and its 12 municipalities, including providing support and education for local entrepreneurs.  Additionally, we provide technical and funding assistance to our communities and for critical infrastructure build-out and expansion projects and support for the development of tourism and recreation initiatives to leverage both local and regional assets.

 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(6)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $149,000/$199,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $136,000 / $179,000

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $149,000 / $199,000

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($33,000)
Received From: Direct   Date Received: 05/15/2020
For What Purpose(s): Payroll Costs

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

COVID-19 has impacted our organization in many different ways.  As everything is so unpredictable for the near future, both industry and community projects are on hold indefinitely.  This has affected our ability to raise operational funding for our office and to recruit new jobs and businesses to the area.  Regional relationships have been damaged due to the inability to meet and exchange information and ideas.  Education and workforce programming is challenging due to illness and restrictions and even infrastructure expansions have been put on hold either due to cost overruns or labor shortages.  

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Long and Short Term Organizational Funding
Local and regional quality of life
Lack of project financing

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

I believe this course will give me the tools to lessen the impact of COVID-19 on the present and future operations of our organization, as well as give all of us fresh perspective going forward.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Lisa H. Baker Baker, Project Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Southern Tier Health Care System, Inc.

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Southern Tier Health Care System, Inc.
Olean, Cattaraugus County, New York 14760-2735
716-372-0614
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Cattaraugus
State (ARC Region) New York


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

It is the mission of Southern Tier Health Care System, Inc. to improve the health and wellness of the rural communities we serve.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Southern Tier Health Care System, Inc. works to achieve several of The Appalachian Regional Commission’s strategic plan goals. Primarily, STHCS aligns most with the second goal of “Increase the education, knowledge, skills, and health of residents to work and succeed in Appalachia”. In 2020, STHCS successfully completed our Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Simulation Lab Project which was funded by the Appalachian Regional Commission. This project worked to bring high-fidelity simulation first responders to learn and practice skills, earn certifications, and put them into practice to provide a higher level of care for the best possible patient outcomes. This type of education removes the trainee from the vulnerability of the field while still exposing them to the situations and skills necessary for success there. While in a controlled environment, learners gain hands-on and critical-thinking skills including knowledge-in-action, procedures, decision making and strong communication. The funding through ARC was critical to the rural first responders and the residents of the rural area we serve.

 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 6/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 7/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $987629/$745364

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $830775 / $760131

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $987629 / $745364

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($73077)
Received From: Small Business Administration   Date Received: 4/28/2020
For What Purpose(s): Payroll Protection Program

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Like many organizations, STHCS has experienced a negative financial impact due to COVID-19. Two of our largest contracts, Office of Rural Health (ORH) and the Bureau of EMS, have not received payment since March 2020. We have continued the work on both of these contracts in good faith; however, this has required us to deplete our operating reserves in the interim. The budget forecast for next year will also be affected as we have been notified that our ORH grant, which largely supports our core operations, will be cut by 20% due to decreased funding in the approved NYS budget. We are working to ensure all operations continue as regularly scheduled regardless of the status of payments and impending cut by seeking additionally funding sources and reallocating our current resources. STHCS was able to apply for and was approved to receive Paycheck Protection Program through the Small Business Administration.

In light of the current environment during the COVID-19 pandemic, STHCS has experienced a reduction in staff due to our current reduction in funding. STHCS has also had to adjust the delivery of several of our programs. With stay-at-home orders and social distancing in effect, we adapted to how we are able to serve our rural community. Using telehealth and re-appropriating the way in which we provide several of our services, we were able to adapt to the current environment.

STHCS is committed to continue operations throughout this pandemic, and this program through the ARC will assist our organization’s operations for the foreseeable future.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Receiving payment from current New York State contracts
Procuring future contracts for sustainable funding streams
Procuring future contracts for sustainable funding streams

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Participation in the Appalachian Regional Commission’s technical assistance program for nonprofit organizations will help STHCS address the massive impact the COVID-19 pandemic has had on the operations of our organization. STHCS hopes to join the Long-term Financial Management program that would enable us to create a plan to move forward to ensure the long-term viability of our programs and our organization as a whole. With the future of the NYS budget unknown, STHCS must prepare for the future and work to procure additional funding sources as well as adapt our programming to continue to meet our residents of the three-county area we serve. STHCS is committed to ensure long-lasting operations and continuing the improve the health and wellness of the rural communities we serve, and this program will help us to address our concerns.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Short-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Donna Kahm, President & CEO

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

Back to List of Applicants

APPLICANT

Cumberland Valley Domestic Violence Services, Inc

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: No


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Cumberland Valley Domestic Violence Services, Inc
London, Laurel County, Kentucky 40741
800-755-5348
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Laurel
State (ARC Region) Kentucky


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Cumberland Valley Domestic Violence Services seeks to decrease the number of domestic violence and abuse incidents by empowering victims through advocacy and education, and to raise awareness by involving the community in solutions to ending abuse.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Cumberland Valley Domestic Violence Services, Inc. (CVDVS) provides safe, temporary shelter for all victims of domestic violence.  We provide the following residential and non-residential services:

  • Crisis Intervention
  • Food, Clothing and Hygiene Items
  • Case Management
  • Daily Activities
  • Individual & Group Counseling
  • Housing Assistance
  • Parenting Classes
  • Life Skills Programs
  • Safety Planning
  • Legal & Agency Advocacy
  • Court Advocacy
  • Domestic Violence Education
  • Financial Empowerment
  • Children’s Services – Group & Individual Counseling, Clothing & Supplies, Secured Private Play area.

Through these services, we are hopeful to increase our residents education, knowledge, skills and health to work, succeed and believe in themselves.  We serve the following eight (8) counties:  Bell, Clay, Harlan, Jackson, Knox, Laurel, Rockcastle and Whitley.  These counties are some of the most rural counties in Eastern Kentucky.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 11/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 12/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $996,932.00/$995,667.00

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $859,000.00 / $706,276.51

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $996,932.00 / $995,667.00

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($92,180.00)
Received From: Forcht Bank   Date Received: 4/20/2020
For What Purpose(s): Payroll, etc., but gave all money back on 9/23/2020 as we had enough grant funding to cover the costs of the PPP Loan

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

COVID has negatively impacted our organization by reducing the number of domestic violence victims we can put in Shelter.  We have had to make arrangements with two different hotels in order to quarantine people for two weeks before transitioning them into shelter.  During this time, we have also had to rearrange staff’s schedules to meet the needs of people in the hotel.  Financial staff has worked from home from March – August during which time we underwent an audit and monitoring by VOCA.  We are not sure when, or if, we will get back to normal.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Keeping our staff and survivors safe from being infected with COVID-19
Keeping dedicated employees in order to keep the shelter open 24/7
Long term funding from both Federal and State entities

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

We believe our participation in this program will enhance the Financial Coordinator’s ability to assess our future needs as far as budgeting and financial planning.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? Yes

List of Organizations in Proposed Cohort:
New Opportunity School for Women (Madison County)
Cowan Community Center (Letcher County)
David’s School (Floyd County)

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? No

Why?

Our Executive Director is not always available to attend these trainings as she is doing most of her work with our Coalition and our Board of Directors via Zoom Meetings.  She is very involved also with staff and with residents in Shelter and those in the hotel.  The Financial Coordinator will be attending these sessions to improve her abilities.

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Theresa White White, Financial Coordinator

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Cambridge Main Street

Total Qualifying Score: 3
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : No (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Cambridge Main Street
Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio 43725
740-439-2238
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Guernsey
State (ARC Region) Ohio


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

To provide memorable experiences that will attract people to our community.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Cambridge Main Street provides grant funding and training opportunities to the local small businesses and building owners that line downtown Cambridge.  These funds are used for business improvements or building improvements and the trainings help to strengthen and grow these small businesses.  Trainings include first aid/cpr, marketing, financial reporting, grant writing, etc.  We then use the cultural heritage assets, ie the buildings in downtown to encourage visitors and shoppers.  We plan and schedule events to bring people into downtown visit these buildings and then in turn the shops and advance our local small businesses.  Future plans include hosting local high school youth to intern with the program to learn more about the Main Street approach and our Five Points to historic preservation and economic development in downtown. 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $54,470/$66,648

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $86,060 / $86960

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $54,470 / $66,648

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($7000)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($7100)
Received From: WesBanco   Date Received: 4/1/2020
For What Purpose(s): Payroll related expenses

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Fundraising through special events is a large part of our operating income.  Because one of our largest events was canceled due to COVID we lost approximately $5000 in operating expenses.  Our first event we were able to hold was much smaller, one because of weather, and two because of COVID concerns and many of our events have been scaled back for safety.  Sponsorships have been difficult to obtain because we rely on the small businesses to sponsor portions of the events (trophies, bands, etc.) and because they are struggling we have to requested funding from them.  We will have to tap into emergency funds to continue operations. 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Funding for the organization
Ensuring our small businesses survive
Ensuring the public is safe during the events we are able to host

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Providing assistance with ideas and knowledge on how to survive the pandemic financially.  We rely on these small businesses and helping them stay afloat and in businesses.  


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Mary Beth Sills Sills, Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

New Opportunity School for Women, Inc.

Total Qualifying Score: 8
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

New Opportunity School for Women, Inc.
Berea, Madison County, Kentucky 40403
859-985-7200
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Madison
State (ARC Region) Kentucky


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The mission of the New Opportunity School for Women is to provide low-income Appalachian and Kentucky women tools to help them grow in self-knowledge, build confidence, and access resources to improve their financial, educational and personal circumstances.

We envision a future in which all Appalachian and Kentucky women achieve successful and rewarding lives that positively impact their families and communities.

Our Values for the Work and the Future include (1) Honor diversity (2) Promote self-discovery (3) Recognize choice (4)  Display mutual respect. (5) Practice kindness.  (6) Celebrate each woman’s beauty.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

The New Opportunity School for Women best aligns with Goal #2 of ARC’s strategic plan.  Our focus is to provide tools to help women build the confidence and access the resources that will help them improve their financial, educational and personal situations.  We accomplish this by offering two 2-week residential sessions annually and five 3-day community-based sessions along with an annual Graduate Leadership Retreat.  Through a focus on self-knowledge and agency along with professional development tools, women leave our programs with both short-term and long-term goals and plans for implementation.  With ongoing coaching, we help women make their dreams a reality whether through the pursuit of a college degree, obtaining a better paying job with benefits, moving into a better home situation or becoming a better advocate for themselves.  At the heart of our program is our Health Cairn that considers all the factors that come into play to make a person a whole and healthy person.  Many women identify better food choices as one of their goals and while most have a dependency on smoking, start to learn other ways to relieve their stress.  Lastly, we develop leadership skills which serves to strengthen their local communities.  The impact of helping a woman build a sustainable future goes beyond just her future, but also inspires her children’s future. 

As part of our ongoing coaching and support services we provide educational scholarships, access to dental funding or other medical needs such as hearing aids, computers for those in school, GED material and opportunities for ongoing training in various subjects.  We also provide access to an ongoing network of support known as the NOSW Sisterhood.  We also help our women grow in their love of their Appalachian roots and culture through various classes and ongoing sessions. 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 4/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 4/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $750,000/$400,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $370,024 / $410,068

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $750,000 / $400,000

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($1,293,189)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($28,221.70)
Received From: Whitaker Bank – PPP Loan Program   Date Received: 4/15/2020
For What Purpose(s): Payroll Protection (Payroll Protection Program)–+*/+0

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

The New Opportunity School for Women (NOSW), although blessed in many ways during these days, has struggled to get hold of the best formatting to offer our programs during this time of social distancing and need for quarantine.  While we were able to complete one of our residential sessions before things shut down in March, without much time to regroup we started reaching out to our graduates and rethinking how to offer our programming.  As an organization, COVID-19 has challenged us in 3 fundamental ways.  (1) Recruitment – because we deal with a population with limited resources, we have often relied on social service agencies, recovery centers, abuse shelters, adult education programs, and our graduates to recruit for our programs.  Most of these programs have been shut down or operating on a very limited basis which has made recruiting impossible.  (2) Programming format – all our current training is designed for in-person sessions.  Switching to on-line programming for NOSW is much like what our rural schools are facing.  Access to the technology, coupled by limited broadband and then add lack of skill and confidence, have served as a barrier for use of this format for new participants.  The uncertainty of when it will be safe to offer in-person programming has us considering new formats and alternatives.  (3) Fundraising – which we have been especially blessed this year in receiving not just one but two large Legacy gifts, the future remains unstable.  We are not able to hold our major fundraiser, Festival of Trees, and are concerned about how well our annual appeal will do.  The uncertainty of the economic impact that will face our nation, we believe, will be profoundly felt in 2021 and 2022 even more so than in 2020. 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Recruitment of new participants – with all our partnering agencies and referral organizations shut down we have not been able to reach out to new women who already struggle with trust issues
Programming Format – all our training has been in-person programming prior to COVID-19 because of the population that we serve
Funding – future fundraising will be challenging with more demands of the existing resources

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Prior to COVID-19 we were talking about developing a train-the trainer module whereby we could train local partners in the work of our 3-day sessions.  Because of limited resources and staff, we thought this would extend our reach and provide a steady flow of possible income for NOSW and participants for our residential programs.  This training will help us, given the impact of COVID-19, rethink how we can better reach women in rural communities and perhaps help with our fundraising efforts by considering partnerships and collaborative fundraising avenues.  Offering more online venues would also help us reduce costs and utilize existing staff.  Working with partners who have a ready population for our services (i.e. domestic violence shelters, recovery centers, adult education centers, etc.) we can envision some joint funding initiatives that will strengthen not only our individual organizations and thus extend the sustainability of the work, but also provide a continuum of “care/services” for the women to help them sustain themselves into the future.  While we do have a larger reserve than many agencies, it will not sustain us into the future very far unless we figure out ways to grow our income beyond our existing avenues. 


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? Yes

List of Organizations in Proposed Cohort:
Cumberland Valley Domestic Violence Center
Cowan Community Center
David’s School

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Robbie Pentecost, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Birthplace of Country Music, Inc.

Total Qualifying Score: 6
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $1.5 million up to $3 million – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Birthplace of Country Music, Inc.
Bristol, Sullivan County, Tennessee 37620
423-571-1927
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Sullivan
State (ARC Region) Tennessee


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The Birthplace of Country Music is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that seeks to perpetuate, promote, and celebrate Bristol’s rich musical heritage; to educate and engage audiences worldwide regarding the history, impact and legacy of the 1927 Bristol Sessions from which we derive our name; and to create recognition, opportunities, and economic benefit for our local and regional communities.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Birthplace of Country Music, Inc. aligns with each of the five goals included in the Appalachian Regional Commission strategic plan:

Invest in entrepreneurial and business development strategies that strengthen Appalachia’s economy
The Birthplace of Country Music Museum facility was the first building on its block to be redeveloped. Along the same block, an existing historic building which once served Bristol as the Executive Plaza office complex has been renovated to operate as a new boutique hotel, with an investment of $18 million. Across the street from the museum, the Cumberland Building has recently been renovated to feature a restaurant space on the ground floor and loft apartments on the second floor. There are 2 additional hotels, one under construction and the other, another major redevelopment project, which have chosen to locate in downtown Bristol as a direct result of the efforts of the Birthplace of Country Music organizations. BCM’s annual music festival, Bristol Rhythm and Roots Reunion has been a significant economic driver for Bristol for nearly twenty years. Many businesses in our downtown sight the festival and museum as reasons for choosing to locate in Bristol.

Increase the education, knowledge, skills, and health of residents to work and succeed in Appalachia
Education is a vital component of BCM. The relationships built with school districts and with teachers throughout the entire region have allowed BCM to become a significant resource. Most recently, BCM has focused its efforts on providing educational materials to our partnering teachers. This gives teachers much needed, ready-made materials to send to their students; offering them an alternative learning experience regarding music, technology and the region’s cultural history. The Bristol area includes numerous Title 1 schools in both rural and urban areas, and these underserved areas are important in our program planning.

Invest in critical infrastructure, especially broadband; transportation, including the Appalachian Development Highway System; and water/wastewater systems
The Museum is located in the Arts & Entertainment district along a key corridor the City has targeted for redevelopment. In fact, the City has improved pedestrian and motorist access to the area through an improved streetscape and wayfinding system as well as updates to the public parking lot serving this block. Additional improvements to parking and sidewalk infrastructure are currently underway in order to accommodate the increase in traffic. The infrastructure plan the city has developed will increase the ability to attract visitors and businesses to downtown Bristol and beyond.

Strengthen Appalachia’s community and economic development potential by leveraging the Region’s natural and cultural heritage assets.
Bristol is extremely fortunate to be the birthplace of country music – a legacy resulting from the 1927 Bristol Sessions. In the words of musician and music historian Ketch Secor, it is “a legacy that will never die”. This legacy should be nurtured, taught, promoted, perpetuated, parlayed and leveraged to the advantage of Bristol. BCM is the entity that is doing that for Bristol. Through BCM, Bristol has a state-of-the-art museum, a nationally and globally known music festival, a 24/7 public radio station, and a very robust marketing and tourism promotion effort. BCM is promoting Bristol and working hard to parlay Bristol’s legacy into economic development, education, visibility, and community pride

Build the capacity and skills of current and next-generation leaders and organizations to innovate, collaborate, and advance community and economic development.
BCM staff members are strongly encouraged to participate in community leadership activities. This includes engaging in professional development opportunities; establishing partnerships with other organizations, businesses and community groups; and serving on boards of directors throughout the region. A few examples of leadership activities undertaken by BCM staff members include serving on the Executive Board of the Crooked Road, the Believe in Bristol Board of Directors, the Bristol Chamber of Commerce, and the Bristol Convention of Visitors Bureau. BCM also offers opportunities for employees to partake in the leadership program of the Bristol Chamber, “Lead Bristol” as well as the Leadership Kingsport and Leadership Johnson City programs.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 12/7 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 12/7 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $3,109,000/$2,962,500

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $2,495,633 / $2,558,022

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $3,109,000 / $2,962,500

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($168,089)
Received From: Small Business Administration Payroll Protection Program; Virginia Humanities; Tennessee Arts Commission; Humanities Tennessee; Bristol, TN CDBG   Date Received: May 2020 to August 2020
For What Purpose(s): Payroll expenses; Museum Utilities; General Operating Support; Administrative Office Rent; COVID-19 Response Supplies

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Like countless arts and cultural nonprofits, BCM is facing many challenges caused by the pandemic.  On March 15th, the museum closed to the public.  Under normal circumstances, Spring is a time when the museum sees its most visitors as tourism to Bristol ramps up after the colder winter months.  This would have been especially true for Spring 2020.  In late 2019, the 1927 Bristol Sessions, the part of American history showcased and celebrated by the Birthplace of Country Music Museum, was featured in the eight-part PBS documentary Country Music.  Visitorship to the museum and tourism to Bristol in general had seen a dramatic boost; an expected result for any locality featured in a Ken Burns film.  Closing the museum has caused significant revenue loss, which is ongoing despite reopening the facility under new safety guidelines in June.  Tours and school field trips have been cancelled for the foreseeable future and museum attendance is down.

On July 6th, BCM announced the cancellation of the 2020 Bristol Rhythm and Roots Reunion. Not only a marquee arts and cultural event, the festival’s economic benefit to the region is extraordinary. The event also serves as a major fundraiser for BCM each year. The negative economic impact of cancelling the festival on the entire community is substantial. 

Events produced by BCM, whether at the museum or in other areas of the region are typically a steady revenue stream and an integral part of the organization’s outreach.  All of BCM’s originally scheduled events have been cancelled or moved to virtual platforms.  Cash reserves are being expended and the possibility of having to reduce staff hours and pay or lay-offs is a growing concern.  Budgets are being analyzed and will ultimately be reduced, causing BCM to rethink certain aspects of its content delivery and introduce entirely new strategies. 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Continuing to lose revenue with no sign of improvement until the pandemic subsides.
Having to eliminate staff positions and lose employees that are extremely valuable to the organization.
The long term impact of COVID-19 on the public’s perception and willingness to attend future festival events like Bristol Rhythm and Roots Reunion.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Continuous improvement is a fundamental principle outlined in the Birthplace of Country Music, Inc. business plan. During these uncertain times, the ability to adapt has allowed BCM to continue its mission and remain relevant by implementing new strategies. However, there is still much to be gained by leaning on the experiences of similar organizations and the expertise of professionals that are also on the front lines of managing the fallout from this public health crisis.

BCM has accomplished many financial goals during its short history. For example, the staff and board of directors were able to raise the funding necessary to build the Birthplace of Country Music Museum and open the doors debt free with the majority of funds coming from outside of the community. The annual music festival, Bristol Rhythm and Roots Reunion, has grown into a 1.5 million dollar event with annual net revenues ranging from $100,000 to $200,000 for the organization each year. The challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic have created a need to establish new long-term and attainable financial goals, which is why the preferred course Long-Term Financial Management is selected below.

Utilizing resources both within the community and outside of the area to assist with the professional development of its staff has always been a key strategy for BCM in its pursuit of continuous improvement. The opportunity to apply for this incredible program is one that our organization would be remiss to pass up. Participating in a course related to financial management will not only increase staff knowledge and enhance their abilities, but will inevitably lead to the planning and development of new and sustainable financial and programming strategies for the organization as it navigates the post-pandemic economic climate.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Short-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Brett Davis, Director of Development

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

Back to List of Applicants

APPLICANT

LIGHTS Regional Innovation & SEE

Total Qualifying Score: 6
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: Yes – 0
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $100,000 to $250,000 – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

LIGHTS Regional Innovation & SEE
Athens, Athens County, Ohio 45701-2979
740-593-2438
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Athens
State (ARC Region) Ohio


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

LIGHTS provides expertise, training, and resources to the region’s workforce, entrepreneurs, companies, and local communities through a series of Innovation Gateways. The Gateways provide business incubation and makerspaces. LIGHTS is for individuals, that live or work in the 26-county territory, with an interest in building a product and/or creating a business.

https://www.lightsregionalinnovation.com/

 

Funded by an Appalachian Regional Commission POWER grant, the Social Enterprise Ecosystem (SEE Appalachia) is a project that seeks to make positive changes to health and wellness, education and the environment. SEE assists social enterprises, which combine the social mission of a nonprofit with the market-driven approach of a business, with financing and operational sustainability in every stage, from start-up to eventual growth and expansion. The Voinovich School and its partners, the Foundation for Appalachian Ohio and the Parkersburg Area Community Foundation, work throughout a 10-county region in Ohio and West Virginia to support social enterprises that share the project’s goals. 

https://www.ohio.edu/voinovich-school/videos/social-enterprise-ecosystem-see-appalachia

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

  1. Our organizations focus on providing technical assistance in the form of a more than traditional entrepreneurial development and Small Business Development support team, leveraging a network of local hubs focused upon product development and making in accordance with add-on Small Business Development technical assistance. In addition, our organizations are working to meet a need and fill a gap within the local service provision ecosystems, providing Services of focused around makers, entrepreneurs, nonprofits, and social enterprises.
  2. Our organizations teach the local populations, those which we get to Market to and engage with first-hand, in coordination with local partners, to allow them to go forth and act on their own. We provide them direct support and the knowledge to go forward with or without us.
  3. We are working to build out critical infrastructure in the way of human capital, through entrepreneurial development. Why all this is not a traditional infrastructure need, including broadband, Etc, it is necessary to help provide a future workforce for the local economy and bridge the gap between education and the workforce.
  4. Our organizations serve existing and new local businesses and organizations whose roots are situated here within Appalachia. The vast majority of individuals whom we serve are focused on growing wealth for this area not to be exported.
  5. As part of our collective missions, we support the education of skills and otherwise to a wide diverse population of students, youth, entrepreneurs, employees, and business owners. In addition, we strive to connect any and all organizations we touch with each other when applicable so that we have a large cohesive effort.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: Yes

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 5/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 6/1 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $258,330/$126,706

Q6. Fiscal Year: A combination of Academic (July-June) & Federal (October-September)

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $173,828 / $33,793

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $258,330 / $126,706

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

COVID has forced a transition for a small team of technical assistance providers, who traditionally provide said assistance in person across a 28 County footprint, to primarily switching to remote technical assistance delivery in and across an area with historical connectivity in Broadband issues in concert with digital literacy challenges. the pandemic and related health and safety issues has upended traditional service provision, placing a much larger burden and challenge upon lead finding to be able to provide assistance to the large service area.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Continued Funding
Personnel Turnover
Vision & Mission Fit with Regional Needs and Resource Pools

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

I hope that as a cohort, the program will help us think about the larger picture in which we can better determine our methodology and process for determining how we fit within the regional ecosystem, what Key activities we should further lean into to ensure the viability and sustainability while providing to and meeting the needs for the local population


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? Yes

List of Organizations in Proposed Cohort:
LIGHTS Regional Innovation
SEE

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Mission & Operations

Course #2 Choice: 2-Short-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 B: 5-Week Course (Mar. 1, 2021-April 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Nathaniel Berger Berger, Associate Director, LIGHTS Regional Innovation

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

Back to List of Applicants

APPLICANT

Athens County Child Advocacy Center

Total Qualifying Score: 6
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $100,000 to $250,000 – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Athens County Child Advocacy Center
Athens, Athens County, Ohio 45701
740-566-4847
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Athens
State (ARC Region) Ohio


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The Athens County Child Advocacy Center is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization providing services to children who are survivors of sexual abuse and their families through coordinated interagency investigation, intervention, education and advocacy.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

The Athens County Child Advocacy Center provides both direct services to child survivors of abuse as well as education and outreach through collaboration with other agencies, school systems, and community organizations. The CAC coordinates a community response to child abuse. This response aligns with the ARC’s 2nd goal of increasing “education, knowledge, skills and health of residents to work and succeed in Appalachia.”

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $211,858/$203,092

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $162,019 / $162,278

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $211,858 / $203,092

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($30,252)
Received From: Peoples Bank   Date Received: 04/24/20
For What Purpose(s): Portion of payroll

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

  • Increased expenses due to need to purchase PPE and other safety measures
  • Decreased fundraising revenue – had to cancel one of our 2 main fundraising events in April 2020
  • Staffing schedule challenges due to personal obligations with regards to childcare

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
How to keep staff and clients safe in the midst of a pandemic
How we will survive 32% federal funding cut in the midst of a pandemic and continue to serve child survivors of abuse
Concerns that child survivors of abuse are not being identified due to the pandemic

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

I am the Executive Director of a nonprofit organization with only two full time staff. I need more guidance and education on how to weather the storm and ensure that our organization is sustainable in the long run. The work we do for child survivors of sexual abuse is invaluable to children and families. We must determine a way to become more financially stable.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Melissa Greenlee, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Appalachia Habitat for Humanity, Inc.

Total Qualifying Score: 8
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: Yes – 0
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Appalachia Habitat for Humanity, Inc.
Robbins, Scott County, Tennessee 37852
423-627-2507
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Scott
State (ARC Region) Tennessee


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Seeking to put God’s love into action, Habitat for Humanity brings people together to build homes, communities and hope.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Appalachia HFH, which began in 1978, is the second oldest Habitat affiliate in the world and the oldest in Tennessee.   Our focus has always been, and continues to be, servicing the low-income residents of Scott and Morgan Counties with decent, affordable and safe housing.  We focus on building and financing new home construction and completing home repairs which include accessibility additions such as wheelchair ramps, widening doorways and floor repairs.  

We feel we meet the Appalachian Regional Commission’s strategic plan of increasing the education, knowledge, skills and health of residents to work and succeed in Appalachia. 

Our work seeks to improve our clients lives with one basic necessity, housing, which also contributes to improved health for them, sustainably to the community and a foundation for future generations.  In 2010 the University of Tennessee did a study that showed children living in Habitat homes did almost two letter grades better on average after moving into their new homes.  Those same children missed 90% less school days and were healthier by 50%.  It also showed the children were 87% more likely to attend college.

Many of our families have been living in homes where the interior walls were covered with black mold, the floors were rotting through, had little to no heat and air.  The sad part is, they saw no way out of these situations until they learned about Habitat. 

When we serve a family with a new home, we require them to attend homeownership counseling/education classes prior to purchase.  This is so important in making them successful homeowners.  They learn about financing, budgeting, the legal documents they will be signing and basic home maintenance. 

Once our clients have move into their new homes, they instantly have a sense of pride, not only in their new beautiful and simple new home, but also in the fact that they have become contributing members of society.  This is because they are now paying property taxes and feel they can get more involved with local government issues. Some of them have even run for public office.

We are a lender of last resort and work with each applicant to find the best housing options available to them.  If the Habitat program is not for them, we make referrals to other possible service agencies and do our best to follow up with them to see if their living conditions have improved.  With limited staff and funds we struggle to serve all those who have a need though.

Our focus is not only improving our families physical lives but also their mental health as well.  We encourage them to keep improving their lives through further education and/or improved job opportunities.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: Yes

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 8/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 7/3 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $670970.99/$670970.99

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $418487.74 / $459875.04

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $670970.99 / $670970.99

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($112000)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Appalachia HFH depends on volunteers to help raise funds to build and repair homes for the families we serve.  We also depend on those volunteers to help with the physical labor required to construct the homes.  For over 40 years we have had summer volunteers and for the past 20 years ,we have had teams from the same schools and churches assist us but because of the COVID-19 Pandemic, they were unable to this year.  We ended our 2020 Fiscal Year with a loss in revenue and in the red.

In 2020 we had planned to construct three new homes for families in need but were unable to build even one.  However, we were able to obtain some funds to do repair work for sixteen Aging in Place Projects for senior homeowners, but because of the high price of building materials, we found it difficult to even purchase materials for those projects, and many times we couldn’t find them in stock when needed.  The price of lumber alone has doubled since the beginning of the year with all most all building materials having an increase in cost.  Since we are located in a very rural area, prices were generally higher and availability scarce but now it is an even harder struggle to juggle the cost increase with availability.

Our volunteers generally raise over $250,000 for our new home program and come to Robbins for 12-13 weeks each summer to help with constructing those homes.  This year we have had no volunteers and were donated only $37,000 from those groups with the stipulation that the funds be reserved for the homes that they hope to sponsor in 2021. 

If the building material become available but the prices do not come down, we will be building even fewer homes.  The other reality to this is that the homes are going to cost more than they will appraise for, causing the new Habitat homeowner to have no equity in their homes.

As a non-profit, we have always faced our fair share of struggles, but this pandemic has us trying to plan for the unknown of what the future looks like.  We sincerely hope that ARC can assist us with long term financial planning and preparation for the future.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
What does the future of this organization look like? Will we be able to get back to some type of normalcy?
Will we be able to make payroll in the next few weeks?
What if our past funders can never provide the same support as they once did?

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

  1. Learning from others.
  2. Improvement of financial tools in our aging organization.
  3. Guidance of possible funding sources
  4. Creative ideas to grow the organization 


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 B: 5-Week Course (Mar. 1, 2021-April 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Haley Terry, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

RiverLink

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

RiverLink
Asheville, Buncombe County, North Carolina 28801
828-252-8474
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Buncombe
State (ARC Region) North Carolina


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

RiverLink promotes the environmental and economic vitality of the French Broad River and its watershed.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

RiverLink strengthens our community by promoting the environmental and economic vitality of the French Broad River and its watershed.  We believe that clean water, thriving natural habitats, healthy open spaces, and a culture that values healthy streams and rivers are vital for a healthy community. We increase the education, knowledge, and skills of over 1000 volunteers as well as 3300 students annually with hands on river experiences. River revitalization is one of our core goals as it connects people to the river, the water, and the lives the river and its water supports.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 6/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 7/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $1,112,887/$1,148,655

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $943,910 / $873,008

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $1,112,887 / $1,148,655

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($67,400)
Received From: PPL Loan   Date Received: 5/8/2020
For What Purpose(s): payroll costs

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

COVID-19 has affected RiverLink in a variety of ways. We canceled all volunteering for several months and had to rely on staff to complete projects that we normally utilize volunteers for. We have not been able to conduct in person education lessons and are having to think creatively on how best to connect with students and support teachers in teaching the river science curriculum. We also had to cancel our largest annual event- RiverFest- and went virtual for our typical Anything that Floats Parade. This impacted sponsorships and in turn our annual fund as well as removing our largest outreach event for the community. Fundraising has been heavily affected as we have not felt comfortable soliciting as we would have in the past and have not been able to have our annual donor appreciation event. Staff morale is also an issue as staff learns to navigate their roles and their personal lives in this pandemic. Budgeting has also been very difficult in the pandemic as we are unsure how to plan for 2021.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Fundraising- how will end of year fundraising perform?
Budgeting- how do we plan for 2021?
Staff- how do we keep all of our staff and not make cuts? Are their roles evolving? How is their mental health?

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

We think this will be some real world training where we can learn from professionals in topics from fundraising to budgeting. It has been very frustrating to participate in a variety of trainings and webinars throughout the pandemic that paints a very rosy picture and doesn’t seem to be realistic. While we appreciate optimism that everything will be alright for nonprofits like us, optimism only takes you so far. We need real world help with steps we can take to ensure the health of RiverLink and our positive impact on the community.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Laila Johnston, Development Manager

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

OVEC-Ohio Valley Environmental Coalition

Total Qualifying Score: 10
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

OVEC-Ohio Valley Environmental Coalition
Huntington, Cabell County, West Virginia 25773
304-522-0246
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Cabell
State (ARC Region) West Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Our mission is to organize and maintain a diverse grassroots organization dedicated to the improvement and preservation of the environment and communities through education, grassroots organizing and coalition building, leadership development, strategic litigation and media outreach. 

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

OVEC is part of the ReImagine Appalachia coalition and we are in the midst of developing a ReImagine Ohio River Valley campaign. Our aim is to highlight, support, and help develop non-resource-extractive economic development in our region. For our members, volunteers and allies, we offer skills trainings in areas such as community organizing, leadership development, and media relations. We are engaged with several students and professors at Marshall University in a youth engagement program  in which we teach environmental values and work on building narratives that celebrate our regional history and offer positive visions for our future. 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 9/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 6/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $566,850/$545,757

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $549,202.16 / $458,916.46

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $566,850 / $545,757

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Like so many grassroots organizations, the pandemic left us scrambling to figure out how to take care of our staff, keep up morale, and check in on our members, and how to keep them connected and engaged.  We have been concerned about the impact the COVID-19 pandemic is having our ability to recruit new members.

To address this problem, we’ve had intense staff brain-storming sessions, researched solutions undertaken by other organizations, and recently hired a new communications person who will help with digital outreach and organizing. To safely engage folks during the pandemic, we planned online events and outside activities. For example, we are holding bi-weekly informal online “lunchtime chat and chews” to learn from our members and the community at large about their concerns, types of actions that motivate folks to participate, etc. We are also working on a geocaching project to educate the public about environmental concerns, elicit new members who may not have heard of OVEC, and to promote pride in our regional history. We are placing caches around the region in key historical sites or places of interest that are also impacted by the environmental issues on which OVEC focuses.

While mileage costs have gone down, we’ve incurred new expenses, such as having to provide and pay for Internet access for our staff at home (and we’ve had to deal in frustration with WV’s terrible Internet infrastructure). While we’ve obtained funding to add three new staff members this year, we are concerned that that funding may not be available in coming years.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Continued funding at the same level (or ideally increased level) for the next several years
staff morale
organizational capacity

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

I started with OVEC as a volunteer in 1995 and became ED in 2019. I do not have any training other than seat-of-the pants in financial management. It is essential that I, OVEC’s ED, receive better education/acquire new learning in regards to long-term financial planning and fundraising in order for me to do my level best at making certain we are at a minimum maintaining our current staffing and, ideally, increasing capacity.

 


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Vivian Stockman, executive director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Ashe Services for Aging, Inc.

Total Qualifying Score: 3
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Ashe Services for Aging, Inc.
West Jefferson, Ashe County, North Carolina 28694
336-246-2461
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Ashe
State (ARC Region) North Carolina


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Connecting people.  Embracing challenges.  Enriching lives…from generation to generation.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Ashe Services for Aging is a vital support for family caregivers and individuals in need in our community.  We provide child day care services to infants through 5 years old that allows working parents to continue working.  We also provide adult day care services that provide a place for adults 18 and over to come each day that provides socialization, meals, personal care and medication management.  This service is crucial to so many family caregivers who need to work or who are in need of respite from full time caregiving, allowing them to focus a moment on their own health and wellbeing.  In addition, we offer in-home aide services and serve as the lead agency for the Community Alternatives Program (CAP), which allows individuals 18 and over to remain in the own home for as long as possible with supports.  We have been serving our community since the late 1970’s through our Senior Center services, providing home delivered and congregate nutrition, education in multiple areas such as healthy living, evidence based exercise classes such as Tai Chi for arthritis, nutrition education and Medicare counseling and support, to name a few.  We have an outstanding exercise room for our senior center participants and have over 1,600 registered individuals that participate in various activities throughout the year.  When living at home is no longer an option, we offer our assisted living and memory care services, which provides 24/7 daily living support in a facility setting for up to 55 individuals.  Our goal is to provide connections to our community through education and support.  We are here to embrace the challenges of our community and further enrich their lives by the services we provide.  We believe that we directly align with the ARC’s goal of increasing education, knowledge, skills, and health of residents to work and succeed in Appalachia.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 94/15 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 105/25 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $5,187,890/$5,140,032

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $4,993,452 / $4,486,550

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $5,187,890 / $5,140,032

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($39,014)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($163,327.75)
Received From: County of Ashe, Area Agency on Aging Region D – Families First & Cares Act, Department of Health & Human Services (NC) for Assisted Living, North Carolina Child Care Subsidy   Date Received: Received from various sources on various dates during Spring 2020.
For What Purpose(s): Various purposes – Personal Protective Equipment, Home Delivered Meals, Special Assistance funding for Assisted Living Medicaid residents, bonus for Child Care employees, grant for child day care needs

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

The closure of our child and adult day centers as well as our senior center has had a negative impact on not only our operating revenues, but more so on the emotional well being of our participants.  They have struggled with social isolation and a major disruption of their routine.  We have seen a decline in social, emotional and mental health for those we serve and employees.  The restriction of visitors to our assisted living has been extremely hard on the residents, but also the families we serve as well.  We have been unable to conduct intergenerational activities.  We have also struggled to obtain adequate PPE.  It has also been extremely difficult to hire and retain necessary, essential employees during COVID-19.  The pandemic has necessitated the need to be creative with sharing information through technology, social media and other formats.  We have also experienced declines in financial resources due to decreased revenues and increased costs of doing business.   

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Financial stability and continued viability of individuals programs and overall organization
Rebuilding programs after the pandemic ends
Staffing in all departments and our ability to serve our community and meet their needs

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

We believe that participation in this program will give us better knowledge and tools to creatively develop a more valuable fundraising plan for our agency that will provide a sustainable source of funding during these difficult times.  We have had to postpone or cancel certain fundraisers due to the pandemic.  Given that our way of communicating has drastically changed over the past six months, we have a need to re-evaluate the way we were raising money and begin thinking of new and different ways that we can increase funding during this time.  We believe this course can help us shift our perspective and find alternative ways to meet our many programs’ needs.   


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 B: 5-Week Course (Mar. 1, 2021-April 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Bevin South, Director of Strategic Initiatives & Special Projects

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

This applicant hasn’t been qualified or been given a qualifying score.

CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

APPALACHIAN EARLY CHILDHOOD NETWORK, INC
Hazard, Perry County, Kentucky 41701
859-582-9745
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Perry
State (ARC Region) Kentucky


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

To Build an environment that supports quality, affordable early care and education for families in Appalachia.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

  1. Invest in entrepreneurial and business development strategies that strengthen Appalachia’s economy-
    1. The Appalachian Early Childhood Network is working to increase Family Child Care in Appalachia Kentucky. While this may not seem like “entrepreneurial and business development” but it is. We are providing training and supports to help people open businesses in their homes in order to provide a service to other working parents that need child care. Child care is the base from which ALL other sectors rely. Without child care, there is no workforce.
  2. Increase the education, knowledge, skills, and health of residents to work and succeed in Appalachia-
    1. The Appalachian Early Childhood Network provides training to child care providers to increase their knowledge and credentialing. We work to increase the quality of care and with that means increasing the education, knowledge, and skills of the child care providers in our region.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 0/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $175720/$228808

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $363280 / $307708

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $175720 / $228808

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

As we have seen, COVID-19 has all but completely decimated the child care industry in Kentucky. It has made the work of our organization even harder due to the decrease in available child care, the increased restrictions around child care, the added costs of running a child care business, and the fear of contracting or spreading COVID-19 to one of our most vulnerable populations. Our organization has been working to increase the availability of quality, affordable child care in Appalachia Kentucky, and now we are working to make up ground that was lost during the pandemic. Our timeline for implementing projects has been pushed back 8+ months, we are having difficulty fundraising, increased hurdles in order to provide required training for child care providers, and we are virtually unable to talk to legislators and policymakers at this time. We are also trying to learn how to do everything virtually with unreliable internet.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
ability to raise funding for operations
inability to connect with legislators and policymakers
the impact of COVID-19 on child care and the survival of programs in our state

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

The Appalachian Early Childhood Network would like help learning about how to fundraise during the pandemic and foreseeable future when people are not wanting to gather and how to creatively network in order to raise operating funds. How can those of us who are in rural, remote, isolated communities get access to the people we need to be talking to?


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? Yes

List of Organizations in Proposed Cohort:
Foundation for Appalachian Kentucky
Appalachian Arts Alliance
Housing Development Alliance

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Kristin Collins, Board Chair

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

Back to List of Applicants

APPLICANT

Mountain Hospice Inc.

Total Qualifying Score: 3
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Mountain Hospice Inc.
Belington, Barbour County, West Virginia 26250
304-823-3922
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Barbour
State (ARC Region) West Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The mission of Mountain Hospice is to provide a comprehensive program for the residents of Barbour, Grant, Mineral, Pendleton, Pocahontas, Randolph, and Tucker Counties. Including physiological, psychological, social and spiritual comfort and care for the terminally ill individual, family and close friends.

 

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Increase education, knowledge, skills, and health of residents to work and succeed in Appalachia;

 

Since the pandemic began in March, we have sought after increased education available to continue are pursuit in providing the best care available to the patients that we serve in rural WV.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 28/6 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 27/8 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $3,504,800/$3,504,800

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $5,038,105 / $4,677,392

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $3,504,800 / $3,504,800

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($250,610)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($653,086.24)
Received From: SBA and US HHS   Date Received: 04/17/2020
For What Purpose(s): Payroll protection, PPE, PPE storage, hardware, educational equipment and cleaning supplies

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

It has given us some challenges of meeting our clients needs and keeping them as safe as possible.  The fear of contracting the virus has minimized within the patients as we have shown them the safest practices necessary to keep their likelihood of contracting the virus minimal. 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
The safety practices of our healthcare workers during there visits to our patients in their home.
Being prepared for the future not knowing how long this pandemic could last.
Having the most education and knowledge during these trying times of running a health care organization.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

We have used fund-raising in the past to assist our patients who need charity care that do not have any health insurance available to them.  We have not been able to do any of our fundraising events that we had planned for 2020, due to the pandemic.  We do not want any patient to be turned away for health care because they do not have health insurance.  Our goal is, and always has been, that our patients on Hospice would not have any out-of-pocket expenses for their end-of-life care.  The hardship of losing someone is difficult enough for families to bare.  That’s why we are applying for any and all educational avenues that feel will help us in the future.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Donna Haddix, Grant Coordinatior

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

F.A.R.M. (Feed All Regardless of Means) Cafe

Total Qualifying Score: 8
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

F.A.R.M. (Feed All Regardless of Means) Cafe
Boone, Watauga County, North Carolina 28607
828-386-1000
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Watauga
State (ARC Region) North Carolina


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

To build a healthy and inclusive community by providing high quality and delicious meals produced from local sources, whenever possible, served in a restaurant where everybody eats, regardless of means. 

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

F.A.R.M. (Feed All Regardless of Means) Cafe is North Carolina’s first donate-what-you-can cafe.  It prescribes a triple-bottom line approach to its operations and provides access to healthy, high quality meals to all community members, regardless of ability to pay.  F.A.R.M. Cafe supports a strong local economy and food system by purchasing as many ingredients as possible from local farmers and producers.  This action keeps dollars in the High Country economy and encourages equitable access to locally grown ingredients. 

 During non-Covid times, individuals unable to make a monetary contribution for their meal are strongly encouraged to volunteer an hour of their time in exchange.  Patrons able to make above the suggested donation “pay it forward”  and help cover the costs of meals provided for neighbors unable to pay.  Over time, volunteers gain skills and knowledge that can contribute to gainful employment.  For example, volunteer tasks include food service, dishwashing, food preparation, and working in a diverse setting. 

F.A.R.M. Cafe’s food recovery and redistribution program, F.A.R.M. Full Circle creates meals and ingredients using foods which would otherwise be landfilled.  Mostly deemed unsellable due to aesthetic imperfections, these foods are collected weekly and processed in F.A.R.M. Cafe’s certified commercial kitchen.  Any unusable scraps are composted, further reducing materials and dollars entering the waste stream.

F.A.R.M. Full Circle distributes meals at no charge through partnerships with organizations providing outreach and assistance to food insecure individuals.  Products are also offered on a donate-what-you-can basis at the High Country Food Hub.  Donations made for these products help cover the costs of materials not donated in-kind (packaging, dry goods, etc.), allowing the program to continue distributing free meals while generating a sustainable revenue stream.  

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 5/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 5/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $319,065/$319,065

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $345747 / $308085

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $319,065 / $319,065

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($44,289)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($28,000)
Received From: Paycheck Protection Program   Date Received: 04/14/2020
For What Purpose(s): 75% staff, 25% overhead

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

F.A.R.M. Cafe’s Board of Directors made the difficult decision to restrict volunteers at the beginning of Covid in early March.  As the cafe is ninety percent volunteer run, this dramatically affected operations and demand on its five full time staff.  Out of an abundance of caution, F.A.R.M. Cafe solely offers meals on a takeout and curbside basis and has not reopened its dining room to the public.  While outreach has dramatically increased and more meals than ever are being prepared for food pantries and other community organizations, daily meal sales in the cafe have decreased significantly.  All in-person fundraisers for 2020 were cancelled, further decreasing anticipated revenues for this fiscal year.   A major impact of Covid-19 on our organization is the sense of community and personal relationships built at the cafe.  On a normal day, an individual experiencing homelessness, a university student, and a lawyer may enjoy a meal together at our lunch counter.  Volunteers from all walks of life engage with one another in a meaningful way.  Individuals who may never cross paths in any other place get to know each other and share life experiences.  This integral piece of our mission- the building of community, is one of the greatest perceived casualties of our operational shift.  

Another concerning occurrence is the closing of similar cafe’s around the United States. As part of One World Everybody Eats, an umbrella network connecting donate-what-you-can cafe’s, we have learned of several organizations who have not been able to sustain operations through Covid.   Factors include increases in demands coinciding with decreases in funding and revenue.  As we are currently experiencing these same issues, the need for out-of-the-box fundraising options are more necessary than ever before for long-term survival. 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
How can we cultivate community and stay true to our mission while operating without direct contact with volunteers, patrons, or individuals in need who utilize our services?
Loss of fundraising revenue and long-term financial sustainability
Staff burnout

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Participation in this program can help staff and leadership develop an annual fund program adapted to the unique environment created by Covid.  This opportunity would allow us to learn and share with nonprofits learning to weather the current state of Appalachia.    If selected for the Missions and Operations program, we hope to gain perspective into how to best continue evolving our mission of building community while meeting the needs of the High Country during Covid-19. An additional motivator is to reconnect with the ARC network.  Past partnerships, such as the Bon Appetit Appalachia Regional Map,  demonstrated the value in working with organizations who focus on the unique economic needs of the Appalachian region.  We recognize this program as a platform to connect with nonprofits with similar demographics, challenges, and opportunities in their communities. 


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 B: 5-Week Course (Mar. 1, 2021-April 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Elena Dalton, Program Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Tamaqua Area Community Partnership, Inc

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Tamaqua Area Community Partnership, Inc
Tamaqua, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania 18252
570-449-8996
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Schuylkill
State (ARC Region) Pennsylvania


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The Tamaqua Area Community Partnership’s mission is to make Tamaqua a place where people can be happy by creating meaningful connections and opportunities for Economic Vitality, Health & Well Being, Arts & Music, Personal Growth through Learning, Sports & Recreation, to elevate the community with Food and to use our heritage as stepping stone to our future.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Although small, Tamaqua, PA, maximizes our capacity by focusing on comprehensive, place-based, sustainable rural community development aligning with Rural LISC Sustainable Communities Pillars and the Federal Home Loan Bank of Pittsburgh’s Blueprint Communities Program. 

  1. ENTREPRENEURIAL & BUSINESS – Traditional Main Street Program Revitalization, Affordable Housing Development, KIVA Trustee micro-lending, PA City Revitalization Improvement Zone Implementation, US Opportunity Zone Implementation, Heritage Tourism Development, South Ward Neighborhood Revitalization, Downtown Upper Floor Redevelopment, Development of Overnight Accommodations, Health Care Job Creation, Makespace development.
  2.  EDUCATION – Communities That Care Prevention Education including Life Skills Training, Social Development Strategy and Strengthening Families Training; Development of local Duel Enrollment & Higher Education Opportunities, Development of PA’s first Family Medicine Residency Rural Training Track to train rural family doctors, Nurse Residency Program Development,  Personal and Community Leadership Training, Work Force Development, Work Readiness Program development, and Recovery-supportive Employment with “Hope & Coffee.”
  3.  INFRASTRUCTURE – Intermodal Transportation Enhancements including walking trails, biking trails, public transportation and rail infrastructure improvments. 
  4.  NATURAL & CULTURAL RESOURCES –   Development, preservation and promotion of 52-block, 900+property National and LOCAL historic district; Integrated Heritage and Recreational Tourism as part of the Schuylkill River National Heritage Area;  creative placemaking, Arts & Culture Development & Promotion, Trail, Park & Playground Development, Volkswalk Development, Historic Property Preservation and Restoration. 
  5. Leadership development through Leadercast(TM), Monthly Leadership Skills Working Group, Lifeskills Training, Social Development Training and “Choose-Happiness.Org” civic and personal engagement, and health & wellness development.

We understand this seems like a lot, but our people really do do a lot.  www.tacp.info, www.tamaquaarts.org, www.hopeandcoffee.org and www.choose-happiness.org are our four websites.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/9 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/10 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $430,000/$390,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $373,974 / $543,829

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $430,000 / $390,000

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($27,200)
Received From: payroll protection loan   Date Received: 4/16/20
For What Purpose(s): payroll protection

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Our Arts Center has been closed for a large part of this year and programs dramatically reduced.  We have experienced a net loss of revenue of $70,000 year over year just from the Arts Center.  Our Hope & Coffee recovery-supportive coffee shop is even worse.  We were open 6 days a week and are now only open three 1/2 days per week. We have seen a loss of more than 50% of our sales revenue.    In addition our community engagement and community planning process (Tamaqua Choose Happiness) had to go virtual and it’s very difficult to have a meaningful community planning process without live meetings.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Our lost sales revenue from our Arts Center and our Recovery Friendly Coffee Shop may force us to close one or both of these critical community services.
Not being able to provide meaningul employment hours to our team has resulted in avioidable SUD relapses.
Our creative placemaking efforts are proven to improve social capital and social connectedness but we do not have funding to continue these.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

It is our hope that, as we reorganize and plan under the Tamaqua Choose Happiness Plan and Brand, this ARC process and program will help us have a purposeful discussion about what that plan should look like.  We want to know how structure our organization and community efforts to be sustainable.  We are very tired of being held out as a great example of comprehensive community development while we are constantly struggling to sustain our operations.  We’ve been doing this for 25 years and long for sustainability and we are hoping this ARC programs can give us some direction and strategy.  


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Short-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 B: 5-Week Course (Mar. 1, 2021-April 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Micah Gursky, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Robert H. Jackson Center Inc.

Total Qualifying Score: 8
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Robert H. Jackson Center Inc.
Jamestown, Chautauqua County, New York 14750
716-483-6646
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Chautauqua
State (ARC Region) New York


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of the Robert H. Jackson Center is to advance public awareness and appreciation of the principles of justice and the rule of law as embodied in the achievements and legacy of Robert H. Jackson, U.S. Supreme Court Justice and Chief U.S. Prosecutor at Nuremberg.

The Robert H. Jackson Center invites and initiates scholarly work on Jackson’s legal, social and political contributions. Programs focus on exploring and challenging the universal principles of equality, fairness and justice through interactive exhibits and facilitated discussions. As such, the Center invites national and international officials and dignitaries to analyze contemporary issues of peace and justice and their relevance to Justice Jackson’s body of work; provides local educational opportunities for school children and college students; and hosts continuing education for attorneys, judges and public officials.

OUR VISION

The Robert H. Jackson Center envisions a global society where the universal principles of equality, fairness and justice prevail.

Purpose
The purposes of the Center are as set forth in its Certificate of Incorporation.  In furtherance of its purposes, the Center advances the legacy of Justice Robert H. Jackson through education, using a variety of methods including live presentations, exhibits, available media, research, and scholarship.  A primary objective is demonstration of the relevance and applicability of Justice Jackson’s ideas to present and future generations.  To that end, special emphasis will be made on educating youth on issues of justice and the rule of law.  These efforts will be based on Jackson’s views on international law, constitutional law, and human and civil rights.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

The Jackson Center is a cultural organization in Western NY and education is at the heart of everything we do. We are fortunate Justice Robert H. Jackson had a broad career and a deep commitment to public service at the local, national, and international level. We work with elementary, middle, and high schools to educate teachers and students on issues of justice, the Holocaust, immigration, environmental justice, civics, human rights, and Supreme Court. This has created a generation of students who are better informed about how the government works and how they have a role in shaping their communities. They are getting involved in local government, become teachers to pass on the information, and participating in society. This has created a generation of educators who are passionate about Justice Jackson and see in him tools to guide their students and help them dream big by showcasing someone who grew up where they did and achieved so much.

We also work with local university students and provide internship opportunities. Many of our interns have gone on to law school or become teachers and are continuing to work in our community. They take Justice Jackson’s signature belief in the value of every human and his deep commitment to justice and incorporate it everything they do.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 4/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 4/1 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $333,442/$398,765

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $528,796 / $511,507

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $333,442 / $398,765

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($40,415)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($51,604)
Received From: SBA PPP/Northwest   Date Received: 05/11/20
For What Purpose(s): COVID Relief

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

One of our significant revenue streams is the sponsorship of our in-person programs. Although we have made the switch to virtual programming, the sponsors either have not yet seen the value in underwriting a virtual experience or are experiencing their own financial stresses that have limited their ability to sponsor. Sponsorships typically are 25-33% of our revenue, so we are missing that support.

Similarly, COVID-19 has reduced the amount of foot-traffic to the Center. We are located in a beautiful historic building, just completed a construction project on a new entrance, and have a banquet room and small theater. We offer free tours and encourage donations. We also rent out many spaces in the Center and those rental opportunities were not available for several months this year and are still a rarity.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
How do I expand my donor base?
How do I encourage guests, sponsors, teachers and students to interact us with in a novel way?
How do I increase our technology/technical capabilities to help not only survive during this time, but thrive and hopefully grow?

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Whatever plans we had for this year, like most organizations, have been completely up-ended. The quick solution to figure out pivots was necessary at the time, but now I need a plan. I need to understand how do I direct my work and our organization to continue living our mission in a thoughtful way. I am a new president, just about 18 months in, and fundraising and financial planning are the areas in which I feel I need the most help because I’ve never really needed to develop the plans for that before. I am craving guidance and structure and tangible action plans that can move us forward. And that is everything that I see this program addressing.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Kristan McMahon, President

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Thrive Regional Partnership

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Thrive Regional Partnership
Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tennessee 37402
423-541-3889
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Hamilton
State (ARC Region) Tennessee


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Thrive Regional Partnership inspires responsible growth through conversation, connection, and collaboration in the tri-state, greater Chattanooga region.

Our footprint encompasses 16 counties across northeast Alabama, northwest Georgia, and southeast Tennessee.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Thrive is a long-term, action-oriented organization that works diligently to reach beyond borders and political jurisdictions to collaborate on a regional scale. Our unprecedented, collaborative framework unites people across our growing region to preserve community and natural character for generations to come. Our focus areas include: community prosperity, natural treasures, and regional transportation and infrastructure. 

Since 2016, our Thriving Communities program has worked with 15 community teams, teaching leaders how to identify and leverage their unique local assets and arts and culture initiatives to inspire community prosperity. The program has generated over $2 million in local investments and engaged more than 1,700 volunteers across the region. We have also partnered with the Lyndhurst Foundation, Southeast Tennessee Development, and the Tennessee Arts Commission to form the Tennessee Placemaking Partnership, designed to support six program alumni in Tennessee by offering additional resources as they build upon their placemaking strategy.

Thrive’s Natural Treasures Alliance is a collective of conservation, outdoor recreation, and land management groups dedicated to long-term landscape preservation across the tri-state region. Thrive brings together representatives from 45+ organizations and individuals across our three-state geography, working together to protect the complex ecosystems and environmental assets of this region in order to preserve the quality of life and values cherished by the people who live here. 

Since its inception in 2017, Thrive’s Transportation Collaborative has employed a diversified approach to transportation planning, leveraging cross-sector perspectives to build an integrated model that encompasses freight, workforce, and broadband connectivity. Our Freight Mobility Coalition, a partnership built of more than 40 major public transportation and private freight partners from across the tri-state region, models the power of multi-jurisdictional collaboration. 

The launch of the Regional Broadband Alliance in 2020 created a collaborative, regional digital ecosystem and network of relationships to address challenges related to internet connectivity and digital equity across sectors and state lines. The Alliance provides a regional framework for piloting research, attracting funding opportunities, and developing new methods that expand coverage.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 3/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 4/1 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $717,589/$556,888

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $814,701 / $600,444

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $717,589 / $556,888

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($33,563)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Much of the philanthropic community, as well as government assistance programs, are pivoting towards restricted funding for COVID-19 related organizations. As an organization that isn’t considered front-line (working on COVID-19), we are often not eligible for current grants and resources.

Thrive, like many nonprofits across the region, has experienced a range of negative impacts related to the Coronavirus, including a drop in individual/private contributions, as well as a decline in anticipated public and philanthropic funding; travel restrictions, including suspension of in-person activities/events and disrupted contact with communities, donors, and stakeholders; and increased stress, technological capacity, and other disruptions related to staff.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Funding and resources
Financial scenario planning
Safety of our communities and our staff

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

The continued survival and effectiveness of organizations like Thrive will depend on the ability to adapt strategies and operating models to new post-COVID realities.

This opportunity will assist Thrive in identifying programmatic and operational adjustments, as well as funding and development strategies, to strengthen our long-term financial stability and day-to-day operations, which will allow us to continue working for the one million people living in our 16-county footprint.

It is my belief that we will emerge stronger and more agile after this instruction, and have a basis of knowledge to incorporate into new monitoring and evaluation frameworks. We will also walk away with ways to more effectively tell our financial story to current and potential donors, as well as Board members.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 B: 5-Week Course (Mar. 1, 2021-April 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Shannon Millsaps Millsaps, Director of Operations

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

Back to List of Applicants

APPLICANT

WV Farmers Market Association

Total Qualifying Score: 7
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : No (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $100,000 to $250,000 – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

WV Farmers Market Association
Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia 25301
304-202-6618
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Kanawha
State (ARC Region) West Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Our mission is to strengthen the capacity of West Virginia farmers markets and positively impact the communities they serve by providing education, advocacy, and access to healthy, locally grown food.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Our organization mission and practices align with many of the strategic plan goals listed for the Appalachian Regional Commission. Through mini grants and stipends to market managers, we provide support to farmers markets across West Virginia to strengthen their agriculture businesses. We have developed and cultivated partnerships with organizations across the state to provide relevant and engaging technical assistance, training, and educational opportunities for farmers markets and their vendors. In 2018, we began a partnership with WV State Parks, WV Department of Agriculture and WV Department of Natural Resources to showcase the beauty, culture, and heritage of our beloved state through a farm-to-table dinner series hosted at eight state parks in West Virginia. Our current and future goals include ensuring continued collaboration with all our partners in order to build the capacity of farmers markets and support economic development in our communities. 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $199,256.39/$164,133.28

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $224,167.59 / $199,119.21

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $199,256.39 / $164,133.28

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

The global pandemic, COVID-19, has created many challenges in our local food system. One of the largest challenges being attempting to meet the increased demand for local food and agriculture products. Although our organization has been focused on this issue for several years, the pandemic brought to the surface the issue of supply and its importance to food access in rural communities. 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Our staffing limitations
Keeping the customer focused on local food once the pandemic fear has begun to decrease
Financial stability and sustainable programming

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

This program will help us develop a plan for financial security and stability. This will ensure our current and future programs and services meet the needs of West Virginia farmers markets, agriculture businesses, and communities. 


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Erica Gallimore, Project Coordinator

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

The Learning Lamp

Total Qualifying Score: 3
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

The Learning Lamp
Johnstown, Cambria County, Pennsylvania 15904
814-262-0732
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Cambria
State (ARC Region) Pennsylvania


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The mission of The Learning Lamp is to engage all children in the support they need to succeed. 

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

The Learning Lamp, a nonprofit organization based in Johnstown, PA, serves a number of Pennsylvania’s Appalachian region counties including Cambria, Somerset, Bedford, Blair, Westmoreland, and Fayette. Focused on providing quality early learning programs for ages birth to five and academic support for children with behavioral and developmental challenges in the K-12 setting, the organization’s work addresses the following ARC strategic goals:
• Invest in entrepreneurial and business development strategies that strengthen Appalachia’s economy; and
• Increase the education, knowledge, skills, and health of residents to work and succeed in Appalachia.

The Learning Lamp provides quality child care for more than a thousand children ages birth-13. With 20 locations across the west-central region of Pennsylvania, it is an important workforce support for employers, including both Conemaugh Health System in Johnstown and Highlands Hospital in Connellsville. Without child care, thousands of parents could not go to work, leaving jobs unfilled and further crippling the region’s ability to make economic gains. When other programs closed due to COVID-19, The Learning Lamp’s lone hospital-affiliated center remained open to care for the children of essential health care professionals and other first responders.

Additionally, The Learning Lamp operates free after school programs, classrooms for children and teens with emotional, behavioral, and developmental needs, drug and alcohol education programs, and an online learning program in partnership with area schools that gives students the chance to make up credits or enroll in academic coursework, ensuring they graduate from high school and become contributing members of our community.

Finally, The Learning Lamp’s own entrepreneurial activities, while nonprofit and social in nature, have created more than 700 jobs across the counties we serve. That, from a humble start of one—the agency’s founding executive director and current CEO, in 2003. The Learning Lamp invests heavily in professional development and credit-bearing coursework for employees, allowing them to earn degrees, gain promotions, and make more money to support their families. At the invitation of Pennsylvania’s Office of Child Development and Early Learning, The Learning Lamp piloted an Early Childhood Education Apprenticeship Program in 2019 that enables child care staff in smaller cities and rural communities to work toward a college degree online and at no cost. A first cohort of seven workers will earn Child Development Associate credentials in December. A second cohort is slated to begin coursework through Shippensburg University in January 2021.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 79/640 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 73/809 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $8,624,924/$8,217,985

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $9,812,710 / $9,335,822

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $8,624,924 / $8,217,985

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($38,800)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($728,700)
Received From: Center for Community Action   Date Received: 7/7/2020; 7/31/2020; 9/30/2020
For What Purpose(s): To support child care programs operated by The Learning Lamp

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

During the early months of the pandemic, the government-mandated shutdown of schools and child care programs reduced The Learning Lamp from a staff of nearly 700 to fewer than 100. Many of those who remained on staff had their hours greatly reduced. All of the organization’s programs, except for one child care center, were shuttered. It was a frightening time, resulting in greatly decreased income and little available work. The stress was compounded by uncertainty. We had no idea how long the money we had set aside for payroll and facilities costs would last. Even while going without pay, the organization’s core leadership team continued to work to ensure the future of The Learning Lamp.

As the curve of the pandemic flattened and Pennsylvania’s Governor began to ease restrictions, some child care programs reopened to meet the needs of working families. Because CDC guidelines require child care programs to operate at only half capacity, and the reluctance of some families and employees to return to centers and risk exposure to COVID, The Learning Lamp’s child care programs are caring for a fraction of children previously enrolled. Yet, some staffing and all facilities costs remain the same. This puts the organization in a precarious position, with child care programs in jeopardy of closing if things don’t return to normal soon. Sadly, normal is likely a year away.

Meanwhile, the demand for child care is increasing. Many people are heading back to work. Unfortunately, six area child care centers have permanently closed their doors since March 2020. Most of The Learning Lamp’s child care centers now have waiting lists of children who can’t be accommodated due to CDC guidelines, and our financial losses continue to mount toward a projected $2 million shortfall for the year.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
The ability to sustain child care programs that are a critical workforce support, but losing money
The ability to accommodate the many families in need of care that cannot be served due to CDC guidelines and a staffing shortage
Where and how to find staff to fill open positions to serve more children

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Founded in 2003, The Learning Lamp is still a relatively new nonprofit organization. While the organization’s services and audience have grown exponentially over the last 17 years, its systems and structures have struggled to accommodate the increase. Manual processes and a lack of technology-driven solutions are holding back further growth and increasing the time it takes for employees to do their jobs. It is also inhibiting The Learning Lamp’s ability to scale—creating jobs and supporting children and families across the Appalachian communities it serves.

A second area of need is further development of the organization’s fundraising efforts. Since its inception, The Learning Lamp has focused primarily on earned income streams. The time is now to build a fundraising office, increase grant seeking efforts, and grow our very small donor base. We are at a critical juncture for this. Without support from donors and other funders, the organization is unable to grow to accommodate the increasing demand for child care services—a critical workforce support for the region’s families.

By participating in either the Mission and Operations or Fundraising technical assistance programs, The Learning Lamp will develop an understanding of available resources and build a plan to carry the organization into the future. From a mission and operations perspective, this includes identifying areas for improvement and strategies for change. We need to learn how to scale and identify the supports needed to make that possible. In terms of fundraising, the organization needs assistance developing and implementing a fundraising plan designed to attract donors and identify potential private, state, and federal sources of funds.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 B: 5-Week Course (Mar. 1, 2021-April 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Leah Spangler, President & CEO

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Historical and Genealogical Society of Somerset County, Inc.

Total Qualifying Score: 5
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : No (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $100,000 to $250,000 – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Historical and Genealogical Society of Somerset County, Inc.
Somerset, Somerset County, Pennsylvania 15501
814-442-3732
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Somerset
State (ARC Region) Pennsylvania


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The Historical and Genealogical Society of Somerset County is the steward
of the cultural heritage of Somerset County through its historical
collections, educational programs, and genealogical archives.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

The Historical and Genealogical Society of Somerset County(HGSSC) provides a variety of public programming for schools, youth, and adults. We
preserve traditional craft/trade skills through an annual Mountain Craft Days Festival and quality workshops such as coopering, tinsmithing, rug
hooking, and others. Mountain Craft Days attracts over 8,000 visitors annually adding over $100,000.00 in sales to the local economy both
onsite, through the non-profits who operate food stands and additional income for hotels, restaurants, and stores. An additional 12,000 persons use the site for programming, recreation, family reunions, and touring.  The HGSSC is the designated county-wide historical society and is the hub of historical preservation, interpretation, and collection conservation within the county.  They are partnered with the Somerset Historical Center through the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission to operate the Museum. It also houses their collections, genealogical library, and historic buildings. The HGSSC property surrounds the Somerset Historical Center on three sides aiding both in their missions.

Many individuals now working in museum fields have been introduced to that field of work through internships or volunteering for HGSSC. Several of these are within the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission and several within the private sector.

The HGSSC has over 400 acres which is used for recreation including a 5K cross-country hiking/walking trail, cross country skiing, tractor drawn wagon rides, a pavilion, classroom, and the Haupt Education Center. It’s forest is managed for the best use of timber, wildlife, and invasive plant species control.

 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/3 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/3 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $125,000/$146.000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $224,105 / $212,828

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $125,000 / $146.000

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($687,554)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($4,500)
Received From: Pennsylvania Humanities Council   Date Received: 08/18/2020
For What Purpose(s): Humanities Programming via social media and video

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Covid 19 has closed the PHMC owned Visitor Center which held our genealogical library, office, grounds for tours, hosting our programing,  and fundraising. This also included our largest fundraising activity, Mountain Craft Days.  The PHMC will keep their PA state museums closed through March of 2021. As a result, the HGSSC does not have access to much of their archives, collections, or educational supplies. The Society has moved their offices to their property adjacent to the Somerset Historical Center. This allows the HGSSC to operate in a much limited capacity with small fundraisers, minimal correspondence, and social media programming. All of our workshops were cancelled as well as lectures, programs, and educational programs. Not having access to the historical buildings meant no tours of the grounds for visitors. These closings were disastrous in regard to income for the HGSSC.  We had to redirect all programming to virtual tours and social media. The cancellation of Mountain Craft Days meant a loss of over $75,000.00 for the Historical Society as well as the many non-profit food vendors and 100 plus artisans. Genealogy correspondence has been suspended due to not being able to access the HGSSC library holdings at the Somerset Historical Center. Cancellation of school tours this year and probably next year not only hurt income, but the ability to present hands-on programs to students. Our Education Coordinator retired just as Covid hit. As a result, we were not able to hire a new person for that position, with programming duties being done by the Executive Director(a former Museum Educator II) the Curator, and other existing staff.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Sustaining and increasing funds to maintain property, staff, operations, and programming
Ability to offer programming other than to small groups
To help direct the funds received in the most useful and sustainable manner. identify new sources for fundraising in the Covid 19 era

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

The HGSSC hopes to learn how to direct the funds received in the most useful and sustainable manner. To find new sources for revenue in the Covid 19 era and in future years, realizing that public programming, touring and large group programs that provided major sources of income will be severely affected in the years to come. We hope to learn how to manage for sustainability in the years to come. With the reduced funding by the government to Pennsylvania state owned museums, it is plausible that they will turn over entire properties to local organizations such as the HGSSC. We would fall under that category of having to take over the total operations of the Somerset Historical Center, greatly increasing our budget to twice of the existing budget. The HGSSC needs that facility and what it has to offer in regard to programming, touring, fundraising, and to maintain a viable presence in the community.  The HGSSC Executive Committee is looking closely at positioning themselves to be able to manage the facility if that should occur, realizing that the State of PA has limited resources which they will direct to their major historic sites rather than to the smaller sites. The program will play a crucial role in helping to prepare the HGSSC for long term sustainability should they acquire the Somerset Historical Center from the PHMC.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 B: 5-Week Course (Mar. 1, 2021-April 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Mark Ware, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Corning-Elmira Musical Arts, Inc., dba, Orchestra of the Southern Finger Lakes

Total Qualifying Score: 8
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : No (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Corning-Elmira Musical Arts, Inc., dba, Orchestra of the Southern Finger Lakes
Corning, Steuben County, New York 14830
607-936-2873
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Steuben
State (ARC Region) New York


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Corning-Elmira Musical Arts, Inc. will consistently present the highest level of classical music to inspire appreciation and provide musical education through the performances of all its ensembles:  the Orchestra of the Southern Finger Lakes, the Chorus of the Southern Finger Lakes, the Youth Orchestra, the Junior String Ensemble, and the Chamber Music Ensembles.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Having a professional orchestra and a youth orchestra in a community supports the economy and community development through cultural and educational activities. The Orchestra of the Southern Finger Lakes (OSFL) promotes music education and developing creative thinking in our youth as well as the general community.  Students in the Youth Orchestra are the top academic students in their schools. Skills learned in music ensembles build on innovation, collaboration, leadership, cooperation, listening, communicating, and supporting. We are building next-generation leaders through the educational programs at the OSFL.  The OSFL music strengthens the mental, emotional, and social health of the community–which is desperately needed now more than ever. 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/2 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/2 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $300,617/$300,617

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $353,681 / $316,313

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $300,617 / $300,617

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($5450)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($16350)
Received From: Chemung Canal Trust Co.   Date Received: 5/6/2020
For What Purpose(s): PPP Loan

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

As we all know, 2020 has been an unprecedented year with large gatherings banned since mid-March and that ban remains in effect today. New York state’s stages are indefinitely closed.  We canceled three live concerts in spring 2020 and created a video for the Youth Orchestra and Junior String Ensemble’s final concert. https://www.facebook.com/YOSFLJSE/videos/304448904279420/

In addition, ticket sales for the March 8 concert was significantly and negatively impacted by NY’s state of emergency declaration the evening prior to the concert.  Therefore, we did not reach our goals for audience attendance and ticket sales for FY20.

Prior to the pandemic, we had secured increased funding for library concerts for summer 2020, but these had to be canceled due to the pandemic.

We also maintained a financially stable budget for the second year in a row. Despite the cancellation of concerts during the pandemic, we had secured stronger donor engagement such that individual donations had increased, foundation support continued to be strong, and expenses were reduced.

Plans for a 25th anniversary fundraising campaign were thwarted by the pandemic and economic crisis.  The board decided to shift gears, focus on developing a new strategic plan (the previous plan covered 2015 through 2020), and pick up the campaign at a later date. 

We remain shuttered and off stage until the Governor’s mandates are lifted.  The OSFL musicians are doing individual mini-concerts on Facebook Live which are free with donations welcome. The Youth Orchestra and Junior String Ensemble are holding weekly classes online but not able to play together through that medium. Consequently enrollment is significantly reduced for FY21. This is our only source of earned income at this time. In a normal year, youth ensemble tuition accounts for less than 3% of total revenue.

Sept.-Dec. is when we typically hold fundraisers. We canceled the first one and are doubtful about in-person social events until a vaccine is readily available, based on a couple of internal surveys we’ve conducted already.

 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Not accomplishing our mission
Losing our patrons: audiences, students, sponsors, donors
Losing staff and contracted professional musicians

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Training on fundraising is needed at the board level. Many board members have expressed this concern.  How do we pick up on a 25th anniversary capital campaign when we were still in the planning stages when the pandemic hit?  We face multiple challenges due to the age and technological capabilities of the majority of our current donors. 

This training is crucial for the sustainability of the organization.  In recent years, the fundraising events netted approximately 4% of the budget. This is well below industry average for professional orchestras, and yet, the Corning area maintains a strong philanthropic community. 


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Karen Dusek Dusek, Managing Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Erie Downtown Partnership

Total Qualifying Score: 8
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Erie Downtown Partnership
Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16507
814-671-8598
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Erie
State (ARC Region) Pennsylvania


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The Erie Downtown Partnership is a nationally accredited and PA DCED designated Main Street organization serving the downtown commercial core by creating a safe, fun, and welcoming downtown through advocacy, marketing and placemaking activities.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Goal 1 Alignment:  The Erie Downtown Partnership is the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development designated Downtown Improvement District and Main Street organization working to amplify and support the downtown business community by improving the environment of downtown.

We serve a diverse mix of 600 downtown property and business owners, 20,000 downtown employees and residents, and over one million visitors annually. Our service area is from the Bayfront up to 14th Street and over from Holland to Sassafras Streets. Our service area encompasses Gannon University, UPMC Hamot, Erie Insurance and many cultural assets such as the Erie Art Museum, Children’s Museum, UPMC Ball Park, Erie Insurance Arena, Warner Theatre, Erie Playhouse, and Blasco Library. The commercial core, known as the Downtown Improvement District, serves businesses and residents in part of the 16501 zip code, noted as the “poorest zip code in America”. Downtown is the heart of the northwest Pennsylvania region serving students, employees, residents, visitors, and entrepreneurs who represent a unique mix of minorities, including New Americans and refugees.

 

Goal 2 Alignment:  A focus on downtown’s cleanliness is key to providing a safe and welcoming downtown experience that supports the businesses, residents, and guests alike.  We employ many different hands-on initiatives including cleaning services such as power washing and litter removal from sidewalks, graffiti removal from public places and privately-owned buildings, deployment of litter and cigarette butt receptacles, as well as flower and tree watering and weeding.  Another tactical approach to creating a better downtown experience is place making activities centered on community building. The Erie Downtown Partnership coordinates numerous events and activities each year focused on health and wellness such as outdoor yoga, a downtown farmers’ market, story times for children, and downtown walking groups.

 

Goal 3 Alignment:  The Erie Downtown Partnership is an advocate for sustainable and accessible infrastructure throughout downtown.  We serve on many committees that center on transportation and access including the Bayfront Parkway Project Advisory Committee, the City of Erie’s Active Transportation Plan, and the Erie Neighborhood Growth Partnership .

We also work to support critical infrastructure to protect our beautiful and economically important bayfront and Presque Isle which surrounds downtown’s Bayfront to the north. We participate on the Keep Erie Beautiful board of directors, are a founding member of the Keep our Bayfront Beautiful Task Force, participate in the annual Inner Coastal Clean-up, coordinate many downtown clean-up efforts, and actively clean downtown’s sidewalks and public areas daily.

 

 

Goal 4 Alignment:  The Erie Downtown Partnership manages a 70-block  Downtown Improvement District, which includes the Bayfront to the north of the district.  The Bayfront is surrounded by Presque Isle Bay with Presque Isle Peninsula visible across the bay.  This natural resource is an essential economic contributor to our regional economy as many downtown businesses rely on revenue from visiting tourists from around the region and Canada.

We are committed to protecting our natural resources and the historic preservation of our built environment and cultural assets.

 

Goal 5 Alignment:  The Erie Downtown Partnership is dedicated to diversity, equity and inclusion to include young leadership and entrepreneurial support.  In 2020 we launched the Listen to Your Neighbor campaign and hosted community gatherings to help citizens learn from one another and how they can help lessen the gap in participation in community development.

We are currently in the process of developing a new Community Relations Strategy to help us understand the barriers for participation in public meetings, events, access to information, and equitable downtown development.  We are particularly interested in reaching traditionally marginalized members of our community such as refugees and New Americans, the disabled and handicapped, new entrepreneurs and students, black creators and innovators.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 4/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 4/1 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $400,000/$400,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $454,506 / $539,502.59

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $400,000 / $400,000

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($344,772)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($90,000)
Received From: PPP Application and County CARES Grant   Date Received: April and October
For What Purpose(s): Administrative and operational expenses

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

The Erie Downtown Partnership had just invoiced its members for their 2020 assessments in early March, right before COVID-19 shelter in place orders were given. Upon shutdown orders we knew that many of our small businesses would be quickly and deeply impacted, which in turn would impact our property owners as well as our assessment intake. We made the decision to offer a grace period to our assessed members, giving them an extension on assessment payments. Our assessment collections are behind compared to this time last year, and we project that we will be even more deeply impacted in 2021 as a result of the impact the pandemic has had on businesses we serve. Last year we had engaged with Provider Resources, Inc. Community (PRI Community) to help supplement our cleaning needs. We had to suspend their contract in March through June as we did not have enough funding to support their work. With the increase in cleaning we needed to re-engage them and found some funding to do so, which was originally earmarked for place making activities. We are working to find funding to further build out out cleaning initiatives and support downtown’s small businesses through the pandemic and beyond.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
How do we fund the additional programs needed to solve the problems created or amplified by the COVID-19 pandemic?
What should a well-planned out funding strategy look like for our type of organization?
Are there more innovative approaches to funding programs and services that we aren’t aware of for organizations like ours?

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

The Erie Downtown Partnership staff and board of directors sees this program helping us to understand nonprofit fundraising and funding strategies more deeply.  Participating with nonprofits organizations that we collaborate with on program delivery also amplifies the collective conversation and accountability that we believe is needed to help us cross the threshold.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? Yes

List of Organizations in Proposed Cohort:
Erie Regional Chamber and Growth Partnership
Erie Arts and Culture

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Emily Fetcko, Assistant Director and Main Street Manager

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

Back to List of Applicants

APPLICANT

YWCA Elmira & Twin Tiers

Total Qualifying Score: 5
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: Yes – 0
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $1.5 million up to $3 million – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

YWCA Elmira & Twin Tiers
ELMIRA, Chemung County, New York 14901
607-733-5575
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Chemung
State (ARC Region) New York


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

YWCA Elmira and the Twin Tiers is dedicated to eliminating racism, empowering women, and promoting peace, justice freedom and dignity for all.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

YWCA Elmira aligns with and implements within our programs building the capacity and skills of next generation leaders to advance community and economic development.  Each of our services focuses around empowerment and equality whether it is directly with our youth mentoring and swimming lessons or indirectly with our childcare services that allow women to work and attend school or our services for breast cancer survivors.  Our organization was created to provide support for women and families so that they can in turn advance our community.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: Yes

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 13/32 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 20/95 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $932375/$1087600

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $1643371.03 / $1610518.50

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $932375 / $1087600

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($20000)
Received From: Chemung County Child Care Connection   Date Received: Pending
For What Purpose(s): Childcare Supplies

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

As a fee for service child care provider, we rely on childcare revenue to supplement our operating expenses. We are the largest provider of after school care in Chemung County, serving 700 families with child care in 16 sites during a normal academic year. After school closed we reduced to 30 children per day and furloughed 100 staff to maintain solvency which was assisted by a SBA PPP loan. 

For the current academic year the number of children has been reduced to 200 families at 14 sites being charged 1/4 of the customary charge due to reduced school schedules. We are currently reviewing which sites will need to be combined or closed to continue solvency.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Overall – the path forward (as we have already made/or are making the necessary financial adjustments)
Liability in the event of illness in the families we serve
How we can add more services to address the current world climate of antiracism

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Fundraising has always been an afterthought for this organization as we don’t have a dedicated fundraiser or the expertise to develop a fundraising plan that can be followed by current staff. We are very good at implementing events and those that we have created have been very successful albeit small revenue generators (Father/Daughter Dance, Mother/Son Dance, Memorial Golf Tournament, Black History Month events) but we need assistance developing large ideas from beginning to end.

We believe with a “game plan” of events that support our mission we can garner community visibility and begin to receive donations and corporate support for our important and timely mission of equality.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Michele Johnson, CEO

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Boys & Girls Club of the Eastern Panhandle

Total Qualifying Score: 8
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: No


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Boys & Girls Club of the Eastern Panhandle
Martinsburg, Berkeley County, West Virginia 25401
304-263-1832
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Berkeley
State (ARC Region) West Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

To enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, responsible citizens.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

At the Boys & Girls Club of the Eastern Panhandle we work with students in grades K-12 to enable them to become their best self.   We offer homework help, tutoring, health & wellness programs, access to healthy meals, arts programs, prevention programs, physical recreation, social and emotional skill building, workforce skill building, and much more.  We provide a safe place for children to be in the afterschool hours and during the summer.   In addition to our work with the members of our community who are school aged, we also work with college students to provide hand on experiences in a number of programs.  We also partner with our schools and other non-profit agencies to provide family and parent education sessions.  While we do not always see the direct impact we have on the community we know that Boys & Girls Club of the Eastern Panhandle helps to “increase the education, knowledge, skills, and health to residents to work and succeed in Appalachia” and “build the capacity and skill of current and next-generation leaders and organization to innovate, collaborate, and advance community and economic development.”

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 9/24 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 7/43 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $1,826,406/$1,826,406

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $1,161,817 / $1,211,953

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $1,826,406 / $1,826,406

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($11,490)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($104,100)
Received From: BB&T Bank (Truist Bank)   Date Received: 4/25/2020
For What Purpose(s): Payroll and Utilities

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

The Boys & Girls Club of the Eastern Panhandle has been impacted in two areas.  The first being the work the Club does with the families and members it serves in our communities.  Regularly programming and activities were shut down in March and it has been a continual struggle for staff to serve our members.  This proves to be a setback as staff work diligently to provide the best programming to enrich our members in their everyday lives. The second being that the Organization had to cancel all major fundraisers for the year.  This has negatively impacted the organization’s ability to continue to provide quality programming across our service area with a reduction in force and programs.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Will our organization survive for the current generation and future generations?
How do we raise funds, while keeping everyone safe so that we can continue to offer quality programming?
How do we provide long term financial stability and organization so that it is around for another 50 years?

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

By participating in this course, it is the hope of the organization’s management team that those participating in the course will have a better understanding of long-term financial planning and will be able to share with the greater team.  The team also hopes that participants will begin to develop a plan to restructure programs to help provide stability and program growth.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? No

Why?

Currently the CEO is concentrating her focus and work on sustaining and building community partnership, donor relationships, and all other areas of fundraising as the organization needs this to continue its mission in the short term.  The CEO has faith that the Office Manager and Business Manager will be able to take part in this course in her absence, and later share knowledge gained with her and the remainder of the management team.

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Short-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Amber Glennon, Director of Operations

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Roberson Museum and Science Center

Total Qualifying Score: 8
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Roberson Museum and Science Center
Binghamton, Broome County, New York 13905
607-772-0660
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Broome
State (ARC Region) New York


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Roberson engages and educates people of all ages and backgrounds by providing regionally significant exhibitions and programs in art, history and science.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Roberson Museum and Science Center best aligns with the Appalachian Regional Commission’s goal number 4: Strengthen Appalachia’s community and economic development potential by leveraging the Region’s natural and cultural heritage assets. Roberson has provided continuous support for the cultural legacy of the Greater Binghamton region for the past 65 years. Over the decades, Roberson has secured a reputation for imaginative and compelling exhibits and has established its value as an extended classroom for area schools. Roberson has also become an important tourist attraction, a resource for community education, and a leading arts organization for residents of all ages in our region.

Accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, we are the largest museum in the area, with a vast collection of over 18,000 historical artifacts, decorative arts, anthropological/ethnographic collections, and fine works of art representing the culture, science, and natural history of Broome County and the surrounding area.

Roberson is committed to being responsive to evolving community needs and interests. Since its initial opening as a community arts center, Roberson has added a museum wing, a planetarium, and a Visitor Center which was a function and service of the City of Binghamton until 2019. At this time the Visitor Center is being fully integrated into Roberson’s purview and programming, providing fresh support for education, exhibits and special events. Roberson’s core purpose of education has led to programming which has engaged every age group, with well over 200,000 PreK-12 students served through class trips and outreach activities within the past 23 years.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 10/6 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 11/20 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $691,875/$941,463

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $977,382 / $1,032,821

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $691,875 / $941,463

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($12,500)
Received From: City of Binghamton   Date Received: 9/8/2020
For What Purpose(s): Roberson received funds to assist in 2 monthly payments towards our property insurance.

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Roberson has worked hard to meet the challenges of the COVID-19 crisis, and our commitment to artists, educators, and our community remained at the heart of the Museum, even while social distancing. The free virtual content we provided, such as workshops, classes, and tours were essential for us to meet our mission. Yet we have had to cancel important fundraising events, children’s programs, school field trips, and community art classes, all of which provide important revenue that we rely on.

Roberson’s doors were closed from mid-March-July 1st and as a result we lost the revenue from potential admissions during that time. Roberson is an admission based organization, and we rely on in-person visits from community members, school children, children’s organizations, and tourists. The revenue we receive from  these sources (admission, in person programs, and fundraising events) are essential, as we use this revenue to provide high quality exhibitions and programs for our community, family, and children.

Our reach and impact has also been severally impacted. Roberson hosts up to 12,000 school children a year through field trips. With funding cuts and safety concerns, these trips have been cancelled, reducing not only revenue, but Roberson’s impact and reach. 

Roberson is supposed to undertake a vital capital campaign within the next year, and it is more important that ever that we connect with our donors and supporters as we embark on this project. Unable to meet face to face, or to host events will be detrimental to our campaign and Roberson’s overall sustainability.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Sustainability of Roberson in the face of long term COVID-19 effects
Continued cancellation of programs and fundraisers will limit Roberson’s impact within the community
Maintaining relationships with donors

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Roberson recently received grant funding towards a capital improvement project, and we wish to develop a capital campaign with the ultimate goal of improving our long term sustainability. By participating in this program, we wish to create a Development Plan that will help us with this goal. With the challenges brought by the COVID-19 epidemic, it is more important than ever to connect with our donors, and create new strategies to improve our sustainability. This program is a wonderful opportunity for our Executive Director and staff to learn more skills in regards to strategic planning and fundraising.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Staci Becker Becker, Director of Development

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Housing Development Alliance, Inc.

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Housing Development Alliance, Inc.
Hazrd, Perry County, Kentucky 41701
606-436-0497
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Perry
State (ARC Region) Kentucky


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

To use the power of housing to transform lives and build a brighter future for our communities.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

We develop affordable housing which is critical to both community and economic development.  As an organization we offer many opportunities to develop the capacity and skills of current and next-generation leaders through employment and board opportunities.  We are entrepreneurial in spirit running our own construction company, creating a paid on-the-job training program for people in recovery, and starting a social enterprise around providing energy efficient repairs. 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 30/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 28/1 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $5421654/$5317933

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $4552631 / $4581085

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $5421654 / $5317933

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($326740)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

We have seen increased costs associated with technology for remote work, PPE and cleaning and adapting how we do business.  We have seen a slow down in new homes sales due to people losing jobs or being uncertain about future.  We have seen an increase demand for homeowner occupied repairs.  Our funding partners including federal agency have slowed down as they have adjusted to working remotely which has slowed our work flow.   The construction boom associated with historically low interest rates and the stimulus checks combined with the production slow down due to COVID-19 has seen construction material prices skyrocket (OSB has gone from $7 a sheet to $30 a sheet).  Contributions are down.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Production disruption dur to staff/subs becoming ill
Customers not being able to afford products due to job less and/or economic uncertainty
Drastic cut in fedral spending after crisis is over due to increased deficit during crisis

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Long term financial planning is essential to surviving in uncertain times.  We have a knew CFO whose ability to create long term financial planning would be greatly enhanced by the TA.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Short-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Scott McReynolds, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Upper Cumberland Broadcast Council WCTE-TV

Total Qualifying Score: 6
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $1.5 million up to $3 million – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Upper Cumberland Broadcast Council WCTE-TV
Cookeville, Putnam County, Tennessee 38501
931-528-2222
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Putnam
State (ARC Region) Tennessee


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

WCTE exists to establish life long learning and cultural storytelling by connecting the Upper Cumberland to the world and the world to the region.

 

 

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

2. Education and knowledge is one of two cornerstones of WCTE’s mission. We believe this should be available to everyone in our region, especially the underserved and unserved. This is why we persist in maintaining a costly antenna broadcast in order to reach those who have no other access to quality programming, including children and the elderly. We understand that early childhood literacy builds the foundation for workforce readiness, which is why we participate in proven programming, such as the Ready to Learn program, that supports not only students but their parents and educators to elevate the education level across the Upper Cumberland. For the elderly, we understand the need for lifelong learning and supporting the highest quality of life possible for those with limited resources late in life.

4. Cultural storytelling is the other cornerstone of WCTE’s mission. With four channels broadcast, WCTE, PBS Kids, World, and Create, we broadcast stories of the Upper Cumberland to leverage our natural beauty, history, culture, talent, and economic assets in the interest of greater economic vitality for the region. Some of our channels are now available on cable or streaming for 24/7 access and increased visibility in larger markets, such as Nashville and Murfreesboro to expand awareness and possibilities for investment.

5. Recently, WCTE was instrumental in creating a collaboration between WCTE,  Tennessee Technological University’s Center for Rural Innovation, The Biz Foundry (The Upper Cumberland’s small business accelerator), and the Small Business Development Center to create the Local Business Resource Collective, a comprehensive resource to help any aspiring, new, or existing business with the connections and resources they need to survive and thrive.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 17/8 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 17/8 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $2,295,955/$2,251,370

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $2,188,291 / $2,388,291

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $2,295,955 / $2,251,370

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($0)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($0)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

WCTE- TV has acutely felt the effects of this pandemic. We have an extremely lean operation. PBS’ definition of a small station has a $5 million or less budget. However, our budget is only $2 million while maintaining our status as a “model small station”. We aim and deliver high with very little resources, so when those resources are compromised, we definitely experience setbacks. Stemming from the sudden economic crisis, we experienced loss of revenue in memberships, events, as well as corporate and private donations. That funding is crucial to our operations. 

 

Many events were cancelled or postponed and others were completely revamped. This caused inefficiencies in planning. Due to remote working conditions, our collaboration was slower and less fluid than usual. Promotions were also delayed or less than normal due to the changing guidelines and uncertainty of being able to host the event or the cost of such promotions. This has led to lower than normal revenues. 

Considering non-monetary effects, remote working and normal turnover has had an effect on our cohesiveness and smooth operations as a team. As a non-profit, we cannot offer competitive wages, so recruitment and retention is always a challenge and more so in the current environment, yet a crucial component to our success. A successful, reimagined, sustainable fundraising strategy would help us to maintain a talented team receiving competitive wages. 

 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
The lost of revenue from the pandemic would be our most pressing concern. Though we are fiscally sound, we run a lean operation so sudden changes, especially across the board in many of our main funding sources, have a noticeable impact. Events are an important part of engagement in our communities. The pandemic has resulted in a lower than normal, or intended, fulfillment of our mission across the region due to fewer in-person engagement events. This poses a potential threat for future revenue growth in those areas.
Maintenance is another ongoing concern. Our broadcast tower is 40 years old. It is in need of an upgrade and needing increasing maintenance. We must keep it painted to prevent rusting and decay, which is $30,000 each round. Due to the age of the tower, we are maximized on how many attachments we can include. These attachments from other companies using the tower is an important source of revenue, one which is limited now that we’ve reached max capacity.
Recruitment and retention of talented employees is another concern. Our mission and positive public relations attract talented, creative individuals. We invest in their knowledge and skills, but they are often enticed by more competitive wages. We commonly offer many professional development opportunities, benefits, and offer flexible work schedules and spaces. However, we believe competitive wages would help to retain more talent.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

We chose fundraising as our main concern. We believe building an innovative, sustainable fundraising strategy would help to alleviate or lessen many of these concerns.

We hope to continue to adjust with innovative ideas on how to host events as the pandemic continues and engage the communities we serve throughout the region.

With a strong fundraising plan, we could better weather maintenance issues. Our financial manager would be able to plan for the replacement of this tower if we had a fundraising strategy in place for its replacement.

With a sustainable fundraising strategy, we could eventually begin to offer more competitive wages to retain the talent we attract.

These same points could potentially be addressed with training in operations, our second choice. Perhaps we could find more efficient ways to perform our duties that could make the best use of the funding we have and will continue to build in the future.

In either case, we recognize the benefit of outside perspective on our operations and welcome the insight.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Mandy Eller, Grant Writer

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

Back to List of Applicants

APPLICANT

Highland Children’s House

Total Qualifying Score: 4
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Highland Children’s House
Monterey, Highland County, Virginia 24465
540-468-1100
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Highland
State (ARC Region) Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The mission of Highland Children’s House is to provide quality childcare for working families in Highland County.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Highland Children’s House increases the education, knowledge, skills and health or residents though staff training, providing early childho0d education and a full service meal program.  Childcare strengthens the economy by allowing parents to seek and maintain gainful employment.  Having a reliable child care service gives Highland employers a recruiting tool to attract qualified staff with young children, thereby creating jobs, strengthening the county financially, and bolstering school enrollment!

 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 4/2 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 3/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $155,277/$172,645

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $67,468 / $49,560

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $155,277 / $172,645

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($3,400)
Received From: Department of Social Services   Date Received: July 2019
For What Purpose(s): Operating Expences

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

COVID-19 significantly reduced our enrollment, caused us to close for one month and restricted our enrollment when we reopened.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Are our precautions enough.
Will we be able to stay open.
Will we raise enough funds to make up for our loss in enrollemnt.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Short and long term financial planning.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? Yes

List of Organizations in Proposed Cohort:
The Highland Center

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Short-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Callie Shaw Smith Smith, Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

Back to List of Applicants

APPLICANT

Virginia Rural Health Association

Total Qualifying Score: 10
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Virginia Rural Health Association
Blacksburg (also have a regional office in Marion), Montgomery County, Virginia 24060
540-231-7923
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Montgomery
State (ARC Region) Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

To improve the health of rural Virginians through education, advocacy, and fostering cooperative partnerships.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

  1. Invest in entrepreneurial and business development strategies that strengthen Appalachia’s economy;
    • VRHA works with our partners to assure that independently-owned Rural Health Clinics are provided with technical assistance to assure best practices in business management so they have the financial stability necessary to continue to serve the communities in which they are located.
  2. Increase the education, knowledge, skills, and health of residents to work and succeed in Appalachia;
    • VRHA provides a variety of educational opportunities to provide rural hospitals and clinics with the tools necessary to best serve their communities.
  3. Invest in critical infrastructure, especially broadband; transportation, including the Appalachian Development Highway System; and water/wastewater systems;
    • VRHA has been outspoken on the need to improve broadband and transportation in order for people in our rural communities to better access healthcare services.  Broadband is also a necessary component to train, recruit, and retain the next generation of healthcare workers.
  4. Strengthen Appalachia’s community and economic development potential by leveraging the Region’s natural and cultural heritage assets; and
    • VRHA promotes the concept that health in rural areas is not the sole responsibility of doctors and nurses.  Education, economic development, transportation, the built environment, and even social opportunities play a role in the health of individuals and communities.  All aspects of the community are providers or barriers to health.
  5. Build the capacity and skills of current and next-generation leaders and organizations to innovate, collaborate, and advance community and economic development.
    • VRHA provides a variety of educational and leadership-development opportunities to students at health professions schools to encourage them to be invested in the future of rural communities.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 5/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 3/1 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $850,000/$850,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: October-September

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $728,000 / $635,000

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $850,000 / $850,000

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

VRHA has a wide variety of educational and technical assistance programs (subsidized by federal grants) that are typically provided face to face.  While we have been able to transition some services to a virtual format, we have been unable to implement many of our services and have seen an income reduction as a direct result.

Additionally, VRHA has been serving as a group purchasing entity for masks, gloves, and other PPE for small clinics that do not have the buying power the big hospital systems have.  The logistics of providing this service has been a strain for the VRHA staff as this is well outside our typical scope of services and skill set.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
VRHA will not be able to recover the funds spent on PPE supplies
VRHA will be at risk of losing income because we are unable to meet the deliverables required in our grant-funded programs.
Income derived from membership will decline as hospitals and clinics are dealing with COVID-related financial strain.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

VRHA has traditionally engaged in short-term thinking. While the concerns above are not to be ignored, none of them will shut us down.  We need a long-range plan to assist us in doing more than just surviving in the future.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Beth O’Connor, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

The eagles nest ministry

Total Qualifying Score: 5
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : No (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

The eagles nest ministry
Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama 35204
205-587-7333
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Jefferson
State (ARC Region) Alabama


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Each one teach one healing the mind body and spirit

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Non profit status allow me to utilize help to help others

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $10000/$10000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $5000 / $3000

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $10000 / $10000

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Not being able to deal with one on one or groups

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Adequate funding
Not being able to meet the needs of others
Not having the tools to perform adequate

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Gives me more knowledge on how to implement my program


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: sherrod Story, Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Tennessee College of Applied Technology Elizabethton

Total Qualifying Score: 1
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Other – 0
Q4. Parent Entity: Yes – 0
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Tennessee College of Applied Technology Elizabethton
Elizabethton, Carter County, Tennessee 37643
423-543-0070
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Carter
State (ARC Region) Tennessee


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The Tennessee Colleges of Applied Technology continue to serve as the premier providers for workforce development throughout the State of Tennessee.

The centers fulfill the mission by:

  • Providing competency-based training of the highest quality that will qualify individuals for employment and/or advancement in jobs.
  • Providing high quality training and retraining of employed workers.
  • Providing high quality training that is economical and accessible to all residents of Tennessee, thereby contributing to economic and community development of the communities we serve.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

TCAT Elizabethton aligns directly with the ARC’s strategic plan goal #2: Increase the education, knowledge, skills, and health of residents to work and succeed in Appalachia.

As a technical college, TTCAT Elizabethton’s main mission to provide training for high skill, high demand jobs in our region.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: State Higher Education Institution   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: Yes

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 39/9 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 37/11 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $5,200,000/$4,995,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $5,100,000 / $4,910,200

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $5,200,000 / $4,995,000

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($440,582)
Received From: Dept of Education   Date Received: 7/22/2020
For What Purpose(s): Student Refund portion of CARES Grant

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

COVID-19 has had a negative impact on everyone and everything.  We were impacted in March as we had to close the college to on-site education and move to an all on-line education platform.  We were able to open back up in May on a hybrid plan where we only allowed classes of 10 or less per Governor Lee’s orders.  Our enrollment has remained steady, but we did see a reduction in state funding.  TCAT Elizabethton’s state appropriations was reduced by $178,700 from May 2020 to October 2020.  TCAT Elizabethton had to implement a reduction in budget plan to ensure the college met its annual budget. 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Threat of decreased enrollment due to COVID-19.
Having to move back to an all on-line education platform due to COVID-19
Threat of further reduction in state funding due to COVID-19

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

TCAT Elizabethton has relied on different grants to provide funding for new training equipment.  We have received the ARC grant and are very appreciative of the help it provided.  Hopefully, we will be able to secure more grants to help with training during the COVID-19 pandemic.  These funds would be used for on-line training modules  and for more equipment which will allow the college to help social distance students to avoid direct contact.  The more training equipment we have in the shops, the more students we can accommodate on campus and meeting COVID-19 distancing regulations.   


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Mission & Operations

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Danny O’Quinn, Vice President TCAT Elizabethton

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Four H clubs of Webster County- Camp Caesar

Total Qualifying Score: 8
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Four H clubs of Webster County- Camp Caesar
Cowen, Webster County, West Virginia 26206
304-226-3888
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Webster
State (ARC Region) West Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

We declare faith in the belied that tomorrow’s citizens come from today’s youth and the betterment of youth is a gain for people everywhere.             Harley “Jack Burton and the Camp Caesar Trustees- 1966. 

Camp Caesar is a 150 + acre ,private -non profit , 4-H owned facility in Webster County. The camp offers long term residential camps for organizations   from 30-350 guests in addition to accommodating day events as family reunions, wedding and other social gatherings.  The campus is also the site for the Webster County Fair- an annual event that established in 1918.  The entire campus was named a Historical District by the West Virginia Division of Culture and History in 2009. This status was gained to preserve the craftsmanship exhibited in the numerous cabins and meeting spaces which reflect the New Deal Era of the 1930’s and 1940’s, little has changed in the state park like facility over the decades and numerous guests make the annual trip to stay in this historical atmosphere.  The facility offers three meals a day to the summer residential guests and the home-cooked meals are met with glee by the campers.  In the off season the culinary skills are used for catering events both on and off site and hosting weekend events.  The public utilizes the camp’s facilities through the season accessing the public swimming pool, the 12 acre lake, the trails, and  meeting rentals. 

In  early 2020 the camp had secured numerous events to sustain the off season period, but with COVID health restrictions all events were cancelled until at least June 22, 2020. Following the Health Department guidelines the events that followed from July-October were sparse- if able to be held at all.  An occasion cabin rental to family units for overnight lodging have been the source of income.  

In an normal season the facility would offer on average 50 summer employment opportunities for youth and adults in our area. on average 9 staff work 9 months out of the year and three full time employees.  This season the camp was able to access the PPP program for 6 staff in addition to 2 full time staff.  

The camp is seeking direction for the next season as resources dwindle and bookings for 2021 are slim as guests await the opportunity to return to the campus.  

 

 

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Camp Caesar would align with at least to goals- 3 & 4. 

Goal 3. The aging facility is looking to replace and upgrade the antiquated infrastructural water, sewer and electrical services that supply the camp. The board of trustees have forged ahead to write ARC applications to address the need for the improvements- to date these have not been funded. The business office has worked with the WVDO initiative through the Flex-E-Grant programs to draft a master site plan, and pre-engineering study and  an economic impact study to prepare for then future funding. 

Goal 4. The camp is currently operating in their 98th season- protecting and educating our community residents and guests on the the distinct Appalachian culture and is a role that the camp staff and board have inherited.  We teach our youth staff not only the soft skills of employment to make them better employees now and in the future- but also about the hard times their families faced to make this campus the place others come to visit today.  Protecting and educating is built within our mission statement ( displayed above) and we seek to honor that role from our predecessors.  

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 3/6 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 4/12 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $12,217/$42,712

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $327,490 / $382,974

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $12,217 / $42,712

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($700,000.00)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($24,100.00 PPP)
Received From: Payroll Protection Program   Date Received: May 6, 2020
For What Purpose(s): To cover payroll for 8 weeks

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

In  early 2020 the camp had secured numerous events to sustain the off season period, but with COVID health restrictions all events were cancelled until at least June 22, 2020. Following the Health Department guidelines the events that followed from July-October were sparse- if able to be held at all.  An occasion cabin rental to family units for overnight lodging have been the source of income.  

In an normal season the facility would offer on average 50 summer employment opportunities for youth and adults in our area. on average 9 staff work 9 months out of the year and three full time employees.  This season the camp was able to access the PPP program for 6 staff in addition to 2 full time staff.  

The camp is seeking direction for the next season as resources dwindle and bookings for 2021 are slim as guests await the opportunity to return to the campus.  

 

 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Securing funds to cover the losses currently experiencing.
Uncertainty of the timeline for re-opening and health guidelines restrictions for camps relaxed or lifted.
Retaining staff which are currently unemployed for the upcoming season

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

I’m not sure- but we need to remain hopeful that with good money management and  educational opportunities we can weather this stormy season and even face the future stronger and more prepared.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Short-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Betsy Morris, Camp Caesar Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Square One GJM

Total Qualifying Score: 4
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : No (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Square One GJM
Gallipolis, Gallia County, Ohio 45631
740-441-5809
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Gallia
State (ARC Region) Ohio


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Square One’s mission is to provide victims of Gallia, Jackson and Meigs Counties a safe and confidential space to connect to the local resources, to offer emergency shelter and to teach a multitude of skills that would empower clients to self-sufficiency.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

We believe that our mission aligns with the goals of the Appalachian Regional Commission by not only addressing the health and saftey of the residents by providing a space where they can seek shelter and resources but buy also teaching skills that will allow residents to become successful in maintaining a life free from abuse and trauma.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 0/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 0/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $428,936/$428,936

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $0 / $0

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $428,936 / $428,936

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($12,000)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($0)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

In January 2020, we were approved for the Capitol Budget Grant.  This grant would provide us with the funding needed to not only purchase the building that our shelter would be housed in but to also complete all renovations needed to be able to open.  Once the pandemic hit, the Capitol Budget Grant was scrapped and we had to start all over.  However, even though everything shut down, crime didn’t stop.  Victims were left with nowhere to turn to for safety.  Although we weren’t able to shelter them, we knew we had to do something.  With no funding, we hit the streets.  We provided food boxes, cleaning supplies, personal hygene items and guidance.  We litterally met our clients where they were to fill the needs that they had.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Providing salaries for employees
Being able to be financially secure as an organization
Being able to grow as an organization

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

As a new Non-Profit and first time Executive Director I think this program will allow me to learn how to bring financial stability and growth to my program.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Ashley Durst, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

West Alabama Works

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

West Alabama Works
Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama 35401
205-391-0331
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Tuscaloosa
State (ARC Region) Alabama


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The mission of the West Alabama Works is to promote the economic prosperity of our region through well-managed, coordinated, integrated and quality support services for employers and job seekers at all levels. 

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

West Alabama Works was created by industry to support the Region 3 Workforce Council.  The purpose of the regional workforce development system is to facilitate the establishment and implementation of a comprehensive, coordinated, seamless workforce development system for the region that supports economic and workforce training activities.  The West Alabama Works is business led and industry driven.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 16/5 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 15/1 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $464,788/$474,706

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $760,088 / $763,842

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $464,788 / $474,706

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($15,000)
Received From: State of Alabama   Date Received: 9/23/2020
For What Purpose(s): Mortgage Payment

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Many organizations were able to take advantage of the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), but unfortunately, our organization did not qualify. Therefore, many staff members were furloughed. Two staff members were exposed to COVID at a socially-distant community meeting, causing five total staff members to be tested and put on quarantine for 14 days. This caused a larger void in our organization to effectively do our job with the community and our members. Our annual career exploration and hiring event for juniors and seniors, WOW 2.0, was held virtually to comply with COVID-19. Due to the virtual nature of the event, only 75 students were able to participate, while the event usually draws 2,000+ juniors and seniors from West Alabama. Though the event was meaningful for the few who were able to participate, COVID-19 took away the impact this annual event has for our region’s juniors and seniors, which allows them to meet with colleges and interview for full- and part-time jobs.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Businesses have shut down and laid off employees due to the pandemic. As a workforce development organization, we must have reliable employer partners to help put individuals to work. If we continue to lose employer partners due to closings, we won’t have enough jobs to help those out of work due to COVID-19.
Financially, our organization relies on grant funding and sponsorships. Fortunately our funders have been flexible during COVID-19, and we haven’t lost funding. However, sponsorships are at risk, as many businesses are ending corporate giving and sponsorship programs to stay afloat during the pandemic. Worlds of Work, our signature career exploration event for eighth graders, is funded through sponsorships. Without these sponsorships, we worry if our programming can take place.
Though there are measures and programs to help our organization pivot during this time, many of those resources are expensive and require time and training. We hope to find a platform that we can afford to make our student events memorable and successful, but it will be difficult to fund. It will also be a challenge to train our employees, who are already working on more projects than normal due to COVID-19.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

This program will assist West Alabama Works in navigating the unprecedented times we are currently living in. Since March, our organization has developed resources to help businesses and community members affected by COVID-19, including a nationally-recognized reopening playbook, comprehensive PPE database, small business relief fund, childcare database to assist working parents, unemployment claims guide. 60+ public webinars on COVID-19 regulations and a digital resource guide. As we continue to develop solutions brought on by COVID-19, participating in this program would help us continue to reach community members through safe, virtual platforms by helping fund these platforms. It would also help us to continue offering resources to help our businesses stay open and our unemployed citizens find meaningful work with living wages. We would have the resources to continue adding to what we’ve already developed, responding to and assisting our community during this unprecedented time.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Short-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Donny Jones, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Future of Nursing West Virginia

Total Qualifying Score: 7
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : No (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $100,000 to $250,000 – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Future of Nursing West Virginia
Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia 25314
304-549-1841
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Kanawha
State (ARC Region) West Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Nurses and Community Partners Building a Culture of Health in West Virginia through Advancing Nursing Practice, Education & Leadership

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

We address goals 1 & 5 Invest in entrepreneurial and business development strategies that strengthen Appalachia’s economy; and Build the capacity and skills of current and next-generation leaders and organizations to innovate, collaborate, and advance community and economic development.
By providing training program and business coaching to support nurse entrepreneurs to open businesses in all WV communities, especially in rural and undeserved areas. In 2 years we trained over 50 nurses and had 15 sustainable businesses open. Each business hires between 1 and 15 new empoloyees.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $65,000/$50,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $159,000 / $107,000

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $65,000 / $50,000

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

We moved all projects to online training and support services

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Replacing income from our in-person gala,
Financial sustainability
Individual fundraising strategies

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

I think this program with directly help address all 3 of our pressing financial sustainability issues through the listed training topics.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Aila Accad Accad, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Fairmont Community Development Partnership, Inc.

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Fairmont Community Development Partnership, Inc.
Fairmont, Marion County, West Virginia 26554
304-366-7600
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Marion
State (ARC Region) West Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The Fairmont Community Development Partnership is a private, non-profit organization which promotes community and economic development along with neighborhood revitalization and affordable housing in targeted low income areas.  Our primary goals are to improve quality of lives by assisting low-income families with safe, decent, housing; and, by promoting business growth as part of local community development.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Our mission and strategic plan most directly relate to the first of ARC’s five goals: Investing in entrepreneurial and business development strategies that strengthen Appalachia’s economy. The partnership helps achieve this mission through two programs: The Excellerator and a Small Business Revolving Loan Fund.

The Excellerator is a business incubator in the form of office space, housed just outside of downtown Fairmont. It has room for up to 6 start-ups, depending on the amount of office space required. Currently, all but two spaces are rented. One of those two contain our offices and the other is expected to be rented by the end of the month. This program provides opportunities for start-ups and other small-businesses to expand their business and offer a better client experience at a lower monthly rate than would be required elsewhere. Additionally, the revolving loan fund allows businesses to fund small-to-medium programs or capitol improvements needed to meet the demands of growth or kickstart an increase in clients, income or services.

Additionally, the Partnership has an active role in increasing the education, knowledge, skills, and health of  Fairmont residents by providing the availability of clean, affordable housing in a region that has a significant amount of sub-standard housing. This component of community development is directly linked to the overall health and well-being of Fairmont residents. As people move to Fairmont to take jobs at the new medical facilities, and  the commercial developments in Whitehall, the need for these units will continue to grow. Furthermore, our organization is currently applying for funding to begin offering rental housing counselling services in 2021, in partnership with NeighborWorks and the WV Housing Development Fund. These services will have a quantifiable impact on the education, knowledge and skills required by renters to maintain safe housing environments and increase the overall wellbeing of Fairmont.

The Partnership also works to build the capacity and skills of current and next-generation leaders and organizations to be innovative and advance their business through the revolving loan fund, as well as our support of our commercial food & beverage rentals. These vendors advance community and economic development by being a part of a unique downtown ecosystem, contributing to the heightening of cultural elements in Fairmont’s downtown and providing a variety of options and attractions for visitors.

 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/2 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $331225/$345160

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $466,674.23 / $571,389.08

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $331225 / $345160

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($24750)
Received From: SBA- Payment Protection Plan Loan. Lender – NCIF   Date Received: 8/10/2020
For What Purpose(s): Payroll

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

COVID-19 has had a dramatically negative impact on our organization. Our organization operates on the income received from our rental properties, which comes to roughly $33,000 per month. Due to job loss, loss of income and other factors, we have consistently received 25-30% less of this income since March. Due to the eviction moratoriums, we are unable to evict tenants for non-payment, nor would we want to in the current circumstances. We are in the process of completing the construction of four additional single-family homes through the AHP grant program provided by Federal Home Loan Bank. It was estimated that this project would be completed this summer, at which time the organization would receive a $106k developer fee, which was intended for paying off small debts, establishing a reserve fund and mitigating operating expenses. Because of COVID-19, this project has been delayed a number of times and we do not expect to receive that payment this calendar year.

Additionally, we have seen a significant increase in maintenance costs because we had halted all non-emergency maintenance to reduce the possibility of exposure. Tenants were also hesitant to submit work orders, even for emergency situations because they didn’t want anyone in their home. Because of this, we now have some units that require thousands of dollars in repairs due to water leaks, mold growth, etc. All of which could have been mitigated, had maintenance been aware and able to evaluate at the time.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
No cash reserves set aside for a delinquency in rental payments to meet operating expenses.
Very little money available to meet capitol improvements to existing real estate.
Commercial rentals account for 16% of rental income from businesses, two of which are food & beverage and have suffered immensely due to the shutdown.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Our participation in this program will give us the tools and knowledge necessary to regain financial control and implement strategies that will keep the partnership alive and set a foundation for future success. Due to a variety of reasons, the Partnership has experienced a 100% shift in personnel. Through the transition, shortfall and opportunities for improvement of financial systems and procedures have been identified. Participating in this course will not only give us the background required to not only create a strong foundation, but ultimately see significant forward motion.

In recent board discussions, it was noted that fundraising has not been a priority for the partnership in the past and that is an area in which we could see significant positive impact if executed properly. Our board and our staff has limited experience in this area, but all are willing to learn and implement with the right tools and knowledge. Fundraising could bring in enough extra revenue to mollify many of the struggles the Partnership is currently experiencing.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Short-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Kayleigh Kyle, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Corning’s Gaffer District

Total Qualifying Score: 8
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Corning’s Gaffer District
Corning, Steuben County, New York 14830
607-329-2087
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Steuben
State (ARC Region) New York


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The Gaffer District is a not-for-profit organization that strives to make the historic downtown of Corning, NY, a vibrant, attractive, and dynamic area for people to do business, live, shop, explore, and enjoy.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

1. Invest in entrepreneurial and business development strategies that strengthen Appalachia’s economy;
4. Strengthen Appalachia’s community and economic development potential by leveraging the Region’s natural and cultural heritage assets; and
5. Build the capacity and skills of current and next-generation leaders and organizations to innovate, collaborate, and advance community and economic development.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 9/2 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 9/2 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $1,154,638/$1,151,211

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $1,423,731 / $1,395,047

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $1,154,638 / $1,151,211

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($0)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($134,000)
Received From: PPP (Corning Credit Union)   Date Received: 5/18/20
For What Purpose(s): Payroll expenses

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

The past nine months have been some of the most challenging periods small businesses in Corning’s Gaffer District have ever faced, and this doesn’t look set to end any time soon. In the face of the pandemic, Corning’s Gaffer District has had to shift our strategies to realign which bring visitors and locals to the downtown to shop, dine, and explore have become unsafe and illegal due to the gathering of large crowds. In light of these changes, the suspension of sponsorship funding for these programs has substantially affected our marketing efforts’ efficacy. Small businesses are facing significant layoffs and furloughs, mandatory business closures, changes to compensation plans.
Corning’s Gaffer District has already been looking at the ‘new normal.’ It recognizes that it will be very different for our small business owners: increased working from home, the return to residential that we experienced at the beginning of the year, the continued effect on leisure and tourism, the changing role of service industries and offices, the move toward supporting ‘local’ during the pandemic, the acceleration of online/e-commerce, and the changing types of Downtown Main streets will require new aims and objectives and rethought business plans for many BIDs. Creative thinking will also be needed to address the issue of empty storefront units and the need for diverse funding sources.
The key to finding our footing will be relationships and how resources are pooled to make things happen. Taking a more proactive approach to these tactics would allow for the opportunity to engage with all users and stakeholders of the BID to co-develop long term collaborative plans. Useful data, evidence, intelligence gathering, and management will be necessary. There will need to be increased training and development to ensure the Gaffer District staff can swiftly put these changes in place.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Remaining fiscally responsible and solvent.
Adjusting strategic planning for the new times.
Identifying diverse funding sources and revenue streams

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

For Corning, NY’s downtown to be resilient and adaptable, cooperation and partnerships with programs like the Appalachia Nonprofit Resource Center’s Cohort Program will be vital. Using the District’s initial tactics and response to the pandemic as a blueprint, combined with each small business’s natural entrepreneurial qualities, there is the opportunity to create a new culture. A culture of working together to manage the change and realize the possibilities for a different type of vibrancy in the District. One that would continue to provide jobs and support livelihood development, well-being, and drive economic growth sustainably and inclusively.
Key to this change will be building relationships, but also pooling resources to make things happen. Taking a more proactive approach to financial and strategic planning and fundraising would allow for the opportunity to engage with all users and stakeholders of the region to co-develop long term collaborative plans. This approach would allow for investment proposals to be informed by evidence of need, leading to more sustainable outcomes while also drawing in a broader group of partners and funders, leading to more creative and collaborative ideas that will gather momentum.
While the situation is bleak and uncertain in many ways for small businesses, Corning’s Gaffer District’s proactive response that allows for partnerships and progressive learning will facilitate an inspired response. In turn, inspiring investment, driving entrepreneurial sales and enabling new ideas to thrive and grow – and, most importantly, create a sustainable economy now and into the future.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Short-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Kristen Brewer Brewer, Director of Preservation and Design

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Allegany Arts Council

Total Qualifying Score: 8
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Allegany Arts Council
Cumberland, Allegany County, Maryland 21502
301-777-2787
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Allegany
State (ARC Region) Maryland


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The Allegany Arts Council cultivates the arts to enrich the quality of life in Allegany County.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

The Allegany Arts Council has five strategic objectives, one of which is to contribute to economic development through the arts. We routinely speak publicly and inform/educate our community about the powerful role arts and culture can play in economic revitalization – in fact, for every dollar spent in our community on arts and culture, an additional four is generated, impacting community businesses of all types, sizes and sectors. Through our work to educate our local government leaders and our community, we feel passionately the arts can play a major role in economic development in our community.

In addition to our work as a non-profit organization, we also manage the City of Cumberland’s Arts & Entertainment District, the purpose of which is to promote tourism, increase community engagement, and identify opportunities for investment in a portion of the City. Through this work, we are leading efforts to create a single depository for potential commercial investments, a clearinghouse to showcase tax incentives and programs for reinvestment, and to increase business opportunities for artists.

As the designated umbrella organization for the arts in Allegany County, we routinely participate and engage in opportunities to help shape future leaders and to serve as a model for other organizations to follow. Each year, we engage with our Leadership Allegany program both as a topic panelist, but also as an alumni and supporter of the initiative. We routinely offer technical assistance to artists and arts organizations who may not understand how to apply for granting and we financially support more than 15 arts organizations annually through our direct grant funding. We believe “elevating without alienating” our community is the key to making the entire community more prosperous, which can only be achieved by empowering a wide variety of leaders across sectors, participating in and encouraging collaboration, and innovating in our work.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/3 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/3 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $324035.00/$324035.00

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $311279.47 / $304387.53

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $324035.00 / $324035.00

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($306486.26)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($25600.00)
Received From: First United Bank & Trust   Date Received: 4/24/20
For What Purpose(s): Funding received was from the SBA Payroll Protection Program, which helped cover the cost of payroll and some additional expenses to avoid layoffs.

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

COVID-19 has changed entirely the way we do business. As a full-time gallery, we have not had a live, in -person public gathering since March 2020, which has impacted the openings and sales potential for eight scheduled exhibitions. Since more than 90% of our gallery sales are earned during opening events, our sales have plummeted from nearly $10,000 at this time in our previous fiscal year, to less than $2000 this year, with projected losses scheduled to continue for months to come.

In addition, our typically programming has changed completely with no in-person programs taking place from mid-March-early September, when very small meetings began taking place. That has reduced our programming revenue to nearly nothing, but has also increased our technological costs as we have resorted to the development of web-based and livestreaming programs to keep our members engaged. We anticipate more costs to either purchase the necessary equipment for continued programming of this type, the procurement of professional services for this purpose, and/or the additional cost of training staff to perform these functions.

Lastly, COVID-19 has significantly impacted our membership revenue, which is significant for two reasons (1) it has reduced thus far in 2020 our revenue by more than $3000 with no alternative revenue to support the loss; and (2) in order to receive the state funding we depend upon, we must have a 1:1 cash match for that funding meaning, if this trend continues, not only are we losing membership revenue but we are also potentially in danger of losing our primary source of funding.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
For many years, the organization has relied upon the membership-based model as a means to avoid traditional fundraising and because there was an erroneous feeling that membership played a more significant role in our operating budget. The loss of this revenue may potentially change our entire structure moving forward.
Fundraising – like most non-profit organizations, we struggle with our Board’s understanding of the role and need for fundraising. We are interested in developing a long-term fundraising mechanism that is not based upon $25 annual memberships as that model is simply unsustainable.
Engagement – Arts and culture are seen as luxury items and the first things to go when the economy struggles, but in some ways, arts and culture is one of the bright lights in our community and without a robust effort to retain it, could be the death knell in our downtown community.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

If selected, I will choose the long-term fundraising option for my participation, not because I find it the most interesting, but because I believe we have to develop our skills in seeking and securing legacy gifts, potential endowments, and have a better understanding and approach to advancement than we do.

This training would benefit me as the Director which would then allow me to support my Board in creating attainable goals for fundraising, and change the perception that other revenues pave the way. This thinking has been shown to be both imprudent and not practical in the wake of COVID-19.

 


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? Yes

List of Organizations in Proposed Cohort:
The Greater Cumberland Committee

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Julie Westendorff, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Southeast Kentucky Economic Development

Total Qualifying Score: 5
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $1.5 million up to $3 million – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Southeast Kentucky Economic Development
Somerset, Pulaski County, Kentucky 42501
606-677-6102
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Pulaski
State (ARC Region) Kentucky


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The Southeast Kentucky Economic Development Corporation’s mission is to improve the quality of life and vitality of our service area by promoting sustainable economic development and employment opportunities with creativity, professionalism, and integrity in collaboration with local, state, and federal partners.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

SKED provides small business lending to new and expanding businesses of all sizes throughout our 45- county service territory of Southern and Eastern Kentucky. We couple this lending activity with business training and technical assistance. We’ve developed innovative training programs that help entrepreneurs start and grow their business enabling them better understand how to be successful. This training and resources range from our entrepreneurial SMARTS, Be Boss Online and Supplier Education & Economic Development (SEED) programs. 

Our work with growth oriented businesses throughout the region sets the stage for job creation and economic growth.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 8/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 8/1 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $3,137,557/$2,426,190

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $2,794,965 / $2,563,888

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $3,137,557 / $2,426,190

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($616,393)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($1,040,00)
Received From: EDA   Date Received: July 1, 2020
For What Purpose(s): RLF and Business Technical Assistance

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

It has been difficult to adjust to working remotely for staff and even in two different offices as we work now. We have stretched to provide technical assistance to our borrowers and making a modifications for them. Plus, our regularly scheduled trainings and events have been put on hold or changed.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Future of business prospects of loan clients and their ability to repay.
Future funding & support.
Providing the right programmatic support to businesses and communities throughout our region.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

SKED is one year into a capitalization/growth plan. I’m looking at this program to help me find non-federal sources for funding for SKED. This includes creating a stronger long-term financial picture for the organization with more diversified funding streams.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Brett Traver Traver, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Larry Joe Harless Community Center Foundation, Inc.

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Larry Joe Harless Community Center Foundation, Inc.
Gilbert, Mingo County, West Virginia 25621
304-664-2500
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Mingo
State (ARC Region) West Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The Mission of the Larry Joe Harless Community Center is “To enrich people’s lives in our community and southern West Virginia by offering health, educational, recreational and cultural opportunities.”

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

The Larry Joe Harless Community Center (LJHCC) mission aligns with two of the five goals of the Appalalchian Regional Commission.   The LJHCC provides health community awareness events such as health fairs and health campaigns in addition to daily physical exercise classes to assist in increasing the education, knowledge skills and overall health of the persons in Southern Appalachian Mountains to help in maintaining independency, both at work and at home.

The LJHCC sponsors many cultural and historical events. We assist in promotion of local entreprenuers in multiple fairs and festivals to strengthen the economic development of the community.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 4/22 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 4/24 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $864000/$864000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $870875 / $870875

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $864000 / $864000

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($157000)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

The mandated closure of the fitness area and activities at the center for eight weeks resulted in a loss of over 20% of membership fee income.  In addition, rental income for community events and parties have declined by 41%.   Cafe and Catering income has decreased 20% due to restrictions for dining options and capacity seating.

The LJHCC provided grab and go meals to outreach sites to children and seniors to maintain staffing and assist the community.  In addition, we offered virtual programs to provide health awareness and education.  The LJHCC worked diligently with all community organizations and leaders to assist in the overall health and well being of our residents.  This promoted good will and public relations that resulted in some revenue through grants and contributions but did not equal projected 2020 revenue budget.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
How do we recruit and retain former consumers/patrons?
How do we recruit and retain new partnerships to develop and implement programs?
How do I retain personnel?

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

The program would assist in addressing these concerns by providing avenues to explore financial management and focus on areas to invest for greatest return, for example, i.e. promotion budget and most effective tools for fundraising.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Short-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Cheryl Mitchem, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

Back to List of Applicants

APPLICANT

The Center for Rural Development

Total Qualifying Score: 4
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

The Center for Rural Development
Somerset, Pulaski County, Kentucky 42501
606-677-6000
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Pulaski
State (ARC Region) Kentucky


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Established in 1996 through the vision of U.S. Congressman Harold “Hal” Rogers (KY-05), The Center for Rural Development in Somerset, Kentucky is a 501c(3) nonprofit organization fueled by a mission to provide leadership that stimulates innovative and sustainable economic development solutions and a better way of life for the citizens we serve. The Center also aspires to be the nationally recognized model for successful rural development.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

The Center has supported entrepreneurship from the very beginning.  We work throughout our 45 county service region in recruiting and retention of businesses.  We also host a summer camp for high school students with a passion for entrepreneurship.  Each participant is put on a team and that team puts together a business plan by the end of the one week program.  The winning team receives a Provost Scholarship from Eastern Kentucky University.  Through our training program, we are working with employers and employees to increase knowledge, skills and health of our constituents.  The Center has been at the fore front of bringing high speed broadband to Southern and Eastern Kentucky, helping to build the KentuckyWired network.  The Center continues to develop the next generation of leaders through our Rogers Scholars and Rogers Explorers youth programs.  

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 28/4 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 36/7 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $5,995,180/$5,970,061

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $29, 579,874.00 / $29,914,858.00

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $5,995,180 / $5,970,061

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($452,500.00)
Received From: SBA- Citizens National Bank   Date Received: 4/10/2020
For What Purpose(s): Employee retention and utilities

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

After the utilization of PPP, we have had to cut staffing.  All training events stopped. Our in person deliveries of our courses and all events in our building either cancelled or postponed.   

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Staffing
Generating Revenue
Remaining viable

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Talking with other entities on what is working and what is not.  Post pandemic strategies. 


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Mission & Operations

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Lonnie Lawson, President & CEO

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Urban Mission

Total Qualifying Score: 8
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Urban Mission
Steubenville, Jefferson County, Ohio 43952
740-282-8010
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Jefferson
State (ARC Region) Ohio


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The Urban Mission provides accessible, integrated, and innovative social services that nurture, restore dignity, and produce desirable outcomes for a hurting population and a community in need of economical revitalization. 

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

The following are our 3 core capabilities which we believe align with ARC’s goal #2 and goal #5

The Urban Mission meets the immediate needs of the community by utilizing food, shelter and other essential services to build trust and lasting relationships among our neighbors and friends.

The Urban Mission provides fresh starts and transformational growth opportunities through personal, academic and professional development.

The Urban Mission collaborates on community wide initiatives to end poverty, hunger and homelessness through creative, innovative and sustainable solutions.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 17/4 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 15/5 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $1,135,00/$1,125,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $1,465,717 / $1,026,443

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $1,135,00 / $1,125,000

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($60,000)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($276,000)
Received From: Ohio Development Services, CDBG   Date Received: August 2020
For What Purpose(s): Homeless shelter support

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Our organization has seen a surge in the number of families seeking food assistance through the Urban Mission.  Since March 2020, we have had more than 1,000 new families, who have never visited a food pantry before, sign up to receive food through our food assistance program.

COVID-19 has also caused a number of our “in person” personal, academic and professional development classes to be delayed or conducted virtually.  We plan to move forward with these classes, but have had to rethink the ways in which we can offer them in the most safe and efficient way possible.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
We are currently raising money for a $1 million renovation of a 20,800 foot space we purchased in October 2019. We are creating a food hub and incubator space for the community and have had to delay some of our plans to address the demands of COVID-19.
Need for consistent volunteers
Staying the course of our vision and mission, despite the “tyranny of the now”

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

The Urban Mission has been serving its community since 1959.  Several of our programs are 50 – 60 years old.

In recent years, we began asking questions among our Board and staff as to what it would look like if the Urban Mission moved from being solely a direct service entity, to an organization that helped people break out of the cycle of poverty.

We have made significant progress throughout the past few years, but do not want to lose the momentum we had, due to COVID-19 and the attention we have had to give to our direct service programming.

Our participation in the program would help our organization stay on task and continue moving forward with the vision, mission and goals we set forth to offer transformational programming in the Ohio Valley for generations to come.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Mission & Operations

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 B: 5-Week Course (Mar. 1, 2021-April 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Ashley Steele, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Ithaca Waldorf School

Total Qualifying Score: 7
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: Yes – 0
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Ithaca Waldorf School
Ithaca, Tompkins County, New York 14850
607-256-2020
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Tompkins
State (ARC Region) New York


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

At the Ithaca Waldorf School, students develop a sound social consciousness that provides a robust foundation for ongoing intellectual and moral growth.

The faculty and staff work enthusiastically to develop each student’s full potential.

The Ithaca Waldorf School is a thriving and dynamic center for learning in the community, offering exceptional practical arts and music programs, fostering free, innovative thinkers and inspiring within every student a reverence and stewardship for all life.

 

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

We are a school dedicated to educating students who will embrace the responsibility for stewarding the environment and social relationships around them.   Each student’s capacity for courage, social justice resilience, creativity, problem-solving, and aesthetic sensitivity is nurtured and nourished.  Nestled on 80 organic acres here in Danby, students see the farm, forest & fields around them as an extended classroom.  This gives them a lifelong connection to the earth and the living beings upon it!

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: Yes

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 10/17 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 10/13 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $571,000/$672,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $805,000 / $692,000

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $571,000 / $672,000

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($100,000)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($7,500)
Received From: Ithaca City School District, NYS Department of Education   Date Received: August 2020
For What Purpose(s): Social emotional learning support, increased costs for cleaning personnel, PPE materials, facilities changes necessary for COVID, air purifiers

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

We have budgeted an additional $65,000 of expenses this year because of COVID, and are confident that the costs will exceed this projected amount.   While we are currently grateful to be teaching students for full days, in-person, five days per week, we are fully aware that the campus could close because of a rise in infection rates within our county, mandating a return to remote-learning.  Our capacity to use technology for education has expanded, but it is no replacement for the in-person experience for all (teachers and students!)  

Because of the uncertainty, many families have not returned to IWS this year, resulting in a 30% reduction in enrollment.  We are operating on a VERY tight budget this year, with a projected $124,000 deficit.  Unless enrollment increases over the year, we will struggle in future years.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Budget deficit
Low enrollment
Reduced staffing (Faculty and Administrative)

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Short and long-term financial planning – will be helpful as we move through this crisis

Fundraising strategies – in particular, determining how best to staff the necessary positions, and which grants might be best to reach for.  


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Emily Butler, Director of School Administration

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Heritage Farm Foundation

Total Qualifying Score: 6
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $1.5 million up to $3 million – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Heritage Farm Foundation
Huntington, Wayne County, West Virginia 25704
304-638-3277
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Wayne
State (ARC Region) West Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The mission of Heritage Farm Museum & Village is to be a source of hope and renewal for the Appalachian region. We believe the history of Appalachia – its ingenuity, its hardiness, and its warmth – is worthy of celebration. We also believe future generations are especially in need of this message. We strive to make Heritage Farm a place where hope is given and fostered through our programming, designed to provide positive stimulation and growth in a safe and friendly environment for all.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Heritage Farm aligns most strongly with goals 4, and 5 of the Appalachian Regional Commission’s strategic plan goals.

4. Strengthen Appalachia’s community and economic development potential by leveraging the Region’s natural and cultural heritage assets

As West Virginia’s only Smithsonian Affiliate museum, we take great pride in being a destination for Appalachian residents and tourists alike to come and be immersed in the natural and cultural history of the region. We celebrate the natural diversity of the region through our “Appalachian Backyard Experience” that boasts a nature center with over 20 different native species exhibited in naturalistic habitats and a three-tiered “treetop trek” for residents to explore the deciduous canopies we are surrounded by in a unique way. We showcase our cultural heritage through many different museums on the property focusing on things such as how our ancestors settled the region, household and technology progression from 1800-today, transportation, agriculture and livestock, coal mining and other important area industries, artisan crafts, the ‘old country store’ and much more.

5. Build the capacity and skills of current and next-generation leaders and organizations to innovate, collaborate, and advance community and economic development.

The bulk of all of our programming is geared towards pre-school and school-aged children/youth to learn from the past, appreciate the present, and dream for the future. Critical thinking and problem solving skills are the main focus of each guided museum experience and school program that we host. We love to get students thinking about everyone as an entrepreneur; even their ancestors. If you have a problem to solve and are actively working towards inventing solutions together, you are an entrepreneur. Our ancestors survived settling in these hills years ago by being innovative, working together as family, and then creating ways to make a living in harmony with their surroundings and thus developed the communities we have today. That same amazing “Appalachian Ingenuity” lives inside our youth today and we encourage them to tap into that with things such as our on-site MakerSpace, Challenge Courses, Hands-On Museum and more.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 11/26 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 15/27 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $412,130.17/$657,992.49

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $1,557,984.21 / $1,313,655.94

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $412,130.17 / $657,992.49

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($284,800)
Received From: Paycheck Protection Program and Small Business Admin EIDL Loan   Date Received: 4/21/2020 and 5/29/2020
For What Purpose(s): Paycheck Protection Program and Small Business Admin EIDL Loan

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

As described above, the majority of our programming thrived upon visiting school groups from around our region every day of the school year. With the onset of COVID-19 we have lost a great deal of funds from not being able to host these cohorts, and have lost a key part of our mission that many of us enjoy the most. We have strived to be innovative and provide online learning opportunities for these schools and to create an online application for teachers to use, but it is not the same. We have also only been able to be open to the public since July, due to state regulations, and have not been able to be open as many days of the week as usual due to limited budget availability to pay all the staff necessary to operate in full. There has been a significant decrease in usual attendance, due to fears of COVID and safety regulations. We have had to shut down our rental facilities as well, mitigating another source of revenue for the museum.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Financial Management
Programmatic Change
Visitor Safety

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

We hope that having our full time staff be able to learn from experts in the field, and from other organizations, through this course that we can gain insight to the next steps we should take for a brighter 2021. Change is here to stay, and just like our ancestors before us always have, we must adapt and move forward! The ARC non profit resource center will be a wonderful source of reliable best practices and information to base our strategy off of, and will help us filter through some of the conflicting advice for future business management that is out there.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Mission & Operations

Course #2 Choice: 2-Short-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Rebekah Franks, Assistant Manager

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Seed Sower, Inc.

Total Qualifying Score: 5
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : No (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Seed Sower, Inc.
Dawson, Greenbrier County, West Virginia 24910
304-578-0468
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Greenbrier
State (ARC Region) West Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

To serve the public as an innovative driver of social and entrepreneurial change in Appalachia and beyond by addressing head-on the need for substance use disorder treatment services, and meeting  educational, training, transportation, personal, and practical needs of those suffering from substance use disorder, addictive behaviors, homelessness, at-risk youth, unemployment or underemployment.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

The mission and vision of Seed Sower are well positioned to meet both Goal #1 and Goal #2 as outlined in Q2 above:

Goal #1: Invest in entrepreneurial and business development strategies that strengthen Appalachia’s economy: Seed Sower’s mission meets this goal by providing commercial kitchen and agricultural production space (The Makerspace) for social enterprises and entrepreneurs with a social impact vision to develop their products at our Social Impact Hub without the burden of their own production facility. This increases market penetration into Southeastern WV for craft and locally produced culinary and agricultural products.  

Goal #2: Increase the education, knowledge, skills, and health of residents to work and succeed in Appalachia: Seed Sower’s primary mission is to sustain holistic recovery through housing, transportation, and training/certification programs. By providing a supportive, nurturing environment for adult women in recovery from substance use disorder (SUD), access and guidance through the recovery continuum of care, and recovery support services, we are having a direct impact on physical, psychological, and emotional health. Through our partnership with a social enterprise in the area that provides culinary and agricultural training and certification (a paid work experience), we are facilitating the necessary training, skills development, and certification opportunities that lead to gainful post-recovery employment opportunities and a greater chance of sustained long-term recovery and success in Appalachia.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 0/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 0/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $469,641/$81,587

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $0 / $0

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $469,641 / $81,587

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

COVID-19 has had mixed impact on our organization.  We received our 501(c)(3) determination on 4/28/20, at the height of the pandemic.  The COVID-19 related slowdown and loss of access to community organizations and gatherings has affected our launch fundraising campaigns and delayed our stand-up date.  It also significantly impacted our ability to develop relationships with potential partners within the region as they worked through their own COVID-19 related challenges.  However, it did also provide greater time for planning and forecasting for our opening in Spring of 2021.   

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Laying the proper foundation for sustained long-term financial growth and stability
Sustained, meaningful community engagement for support, fundraising, and volunteer services.
C. Adequate staffing, onboarding, and training for the staff we will bring on board in the coming fiscal year.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

We strongly believe that building something the right way the first time (“measure twice, cut once”) is the best way to ensure long-term stability and a steady progression toward realizing the strategic vision and goals of an organization.  If you don’t make time to do it right, you won’t have time to do it over.  As we are just now preparing for full-scale launch in both recovery services and economic development through our Social Impact Hub, cohort instruction in either Long Term Financial Management or Fundraising will provide us with the most up-to-date best practices that we can apply from the very beginning of our operations.  This greatly enhances our organization’s current and forecasted positions, providing a more informed and educated approach to our growth strategies. Either of these cohorts then allows us to properly plan for and implement staffing strategies more efficiently in the next few years as we grow.  This program will also provide needed expertise and training that will start us off on a firm financial foundation as we enter into a 3-year ARC POWER+ Grant project, the award for which was announced on 10/14/2020.  That project, ” Creating Communities of Healings by Cultivating Businesses to Address the Opioid Crisis”, will be one of the vehicles through which we will operationalize the lessons learned in this cohort opportunity.  


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: James Phillips, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

Back to List of Applicants

APPLICANT

Rea of Hope, Inc.

Total Qualifying Score: 8
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: No


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Rea of Hope, Inc.
Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia 25301
304-344-5363
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Kanawha
State (ARC Region) West Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The purpose of the Rea of Hope (ROH) is to help West Virginia women suffering from alcohol and/or drug addiction by teaching the life skills and self-sufficiency required to reach sustained recovery, while providing safe, affordable, and supportive housing for them and their children.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

ROH empowers women and enables them to experience transformation in their lives by breaking the bonds of addiction through utilizing an abstinence based model. Change is fostered through education, behavior modeling, maintaining a safe environment, addressing healthcare needs through referral, and utilizing 12-step programs for spiritual help. Strong community relationships establish a sense of interdependence; referrals are made as needed on an individual basis. ROH encourages residents to become a part of the community, develop self-respect and become self-reliant. One way this is achieved is through full-time employment, and for those on disability, full-time volunteering (our goal is for all residents to be employed or volunteering within 30 days of admission). Residents demonstrate fiscal responsibility by paying program fees, taxes and fines. The residents have an opportunity to “practice life” by being responsible employees, following a schedule, and learning to care for themselves.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 9/3 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 9/3 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $896,697/$896,697

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $973,673 / $762,173

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $896,697 / $896,697

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($71,534)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($96,000)
Received From: federal payroll protection   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s): to cover payroll and hazard pay

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

The Rea of Hope (ROH) has already experienced loss of funding as a direct result of Covid-19. The ROH was forced to cancel its annual fundraiser “The Miracles on Lee Street Dinner and Silent Auction” this year, which was projected to raise $95,000. This fundraiser earns money through ticket sales, sponsorships, an auction, and donations. It is used to meet general program expenses.
Two grants that ROH has received for the last 10 years totaling $19,500 ($7,500 First Presbyterian, and $12,000 McDonough) were denied this year due to shifts in funding priorities. We typically receive $50,000 from churches and individuals; however, their incomes and abilities to donate are all uncertain during the pandemic as they are experiencing financial difficulties. The $114,500 setback during the first three months of the pandemic has hurt our budget for general program expenses. ROH counts on funding for general program support in order to fill in gaps in funding for critical services and program continuation.
In response to the immediate crisis, the Rea of Hope (ROH) expended approximately $5,000, to restructure service delivery and operations. Our cleaning supplies costs increased, and we had to purchase personal protection supplies. These costs also included buying furniture and creating a quarantine room in case one of our residents became ill. All visitation and passes were stopped, including child visitation. In order to keep our residents in contact with their children, we purchased 2 i-pads for their use. The i-pads also allowed for remote case management. We paid for and began to utilize Zoom for all staff meetings, and resident meetings. Eventually, we had to send all nonessential employees to work from home. As of now, all employees are back to work; however, we still utilize zoom meetings and adjust protocols for passes and visitation per the Governor’s guidelines.

 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Keeping everyone safe and preventing an outbreak
admissions to treatment centers are down, decreased referrals for a period of time will we be able to fill our beds
economy and impact on donor base and foundations

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

The program will help address long term concerns about the pandemic on nonprofits and to create a plan to adjust to differences is the economy in order to still provide services.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? Yes

List of Organizations in Proposed Cohort:

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? No

Why?

Executive Director of Rea of Hope, Marie Beaver, is also its founding director. She has overseen the growth of the program from one house with 10 women to six properties with 30 women and 17 children. Her knowledge is vast regarding long term planning and financial management. Ms. Beaver is currently training the Office and Data Manager, Heather Darr, in grant writing and management. Ms. Darr needs to gain knowledge and understanding of financial planning, reading a budget, etc. The course will help the organization long term; having an additional grant writer frees the Executive Director to focus on other ongoing projects.

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Short-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Heather Darr, Office and Data Manager

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

Back to List of Applicants

APPLICANT

Women’s Opportunity Center

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Women’s Opportunity Center
Ithaca, Tompkins County, New York 14850
607-882-5055
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Tompkins
State (ARC Region) New York


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The Women’s Opportunity Center (WOC) is a not-for-profit organization that supports social and economic self-sufficiency primarily for economically disadvantaged women. WOC provides employment skills training, individualized coaching, financial literacy, computer literacy, health and wellness coaching, and professional dressing.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

The Women’s Opportunity Center strategic plan includes entrepreneurial and business development strategies that support and strengthen the Appalachia’s economy in the Southern Tier region; the employee training programs that are offered to women focus on entrepreneurship and local business development through technical assistance, mentoring, networking, and other types of support which will provide potential leverage to community and economic development; and build the capacity and skills of current and next-generation leaders and organizations to innovate, collaborate, and advance community and economic development. On 09/11/2020 the center had to due to a mass layoff, move the office located in Onondaga County, and cut almost all expenses to make sure that the 3 skeleton staff members could provide basic services to the clients. This organization did not have a crisis plan, nor were there directions to move forth with a plan until the very last minute which was a result of working intensely to provide what services we could for the clients to meet the outcomes which would support the services for the clients.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 6/4 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 9/5 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $658,508.38/$691,462.15

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $751,167.12 / $712572.07

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $658,508.38 / $691,462.15

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($73439.37)
Received From: CFCU Cornell Federal Credit Union   Date Received: 05/17/2020
For What Purpose(s): to cover payroll and approved utilities to continue operations

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Covid-19 has negatively impacted our organization’s financial health. Currently, we are modifying the approved 2020-2021 Fiscal Year Budget to a 6-month projection due to recent layoffs. The organizations are cost-cutting measures. The center has decreased FT staff hours and took away health and dental insurance and the staff already live paycheck to paycheck, some receiving services themselves from the Department of Social Services to help with sustainability. The Women’s Opportunity Center  (WOC)relies heavily on New York State contracts to support operations and since April 1, 2020, the organization has not received a penny from the state. It would be helpful if the WOC  could access immediate funding for urgent needs.  Since July the center has seen a decrease (25% or more) in the usage of our services due to not having the proper infrastructure set up to provide virtual services for the clients that the WOC serves, decrease staff to have available.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
financial health
social impact
capacity to deliver services

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

The Women’s Opportunity Center is seeking support to help acquire specialized service or skill that is not currently resident within the organization, which had been identified after the center experience the Pandemic. It would be great to have a strategic plan in place to operate more effectively or strengthen sustainability. It would also be helpful to expand the capacity of services in the communities we could serve in the Southern Tier area not and not just one county. Relook potential partnerships and other effective collaborations that the center has not built a partnership with.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 B: 5-Week Course (Mar. 1, 2021-April 4, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Ryan Harriott, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Stuart’s Opera House

Total Qualifying Score: 5
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $1.5 million up to $3 million – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Stuart’s Opera House
Nelsonville, Athens County, Ohio 45764
740-331-2457
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Athens
State (ARC Region) Ohio


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Stuart’s Opera House is dedicated to its role as a regional leader in the arts community, a center for public expression, and an economic development partner for Southeastern Ohio.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

On average, Stuart’s provides 25k visitors with over 75 events a year, including music concerts of Americana, folk, world, and bluegrass; provides facilities for up to 20 live theater presentations; produces the Nelsonville Music Festival (NMF), a free International Music Concert Series, and a community led arts education program.

We are addressing the overall health and vitality of our community. If we lose Stuart’s  permanently our region loses — according to the Americans for the Arts Economic Impact Study: $112,979 in State Government Revenue, $100,571 in local government revenue, 77 Full-time equivalent jobs, and $2,541,510 in total expenditures. 

Our arts programming and educational outreach keep us heavily involved with the underserved population of Nelsonville and surrounding communities through cooperative participation in and preservation of the arts.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 9/4 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 10/4 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $895,353/$704,159

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $1,789,350 / $1,786,353

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $895,353 / $704,159

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($325,000)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($130,000)
Received From: Paycheck Protection Program, Ohio Art Council   Date Received: April 17, May
For What Purpose(s): Payroll, General Ops

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

During this unprecedented time of running a performing arts center during a global pandemic, our first priority is to keep all staff employed. To that end, we applied for and received an SBA Loan as a part of the Paycheck Protection Plan through the CARES Act. Stuart’s applied on the first day funds were available and received our $114,500 loan on April 17.

We have a $400,000 projected loss in income from cancelled events, especially the Nelsonville Music Festival.
Cancelled/Rescheduled:
● Melted Music Festival
● Bob Boilen Special Event
● Benjamin Gibbard
● The Nelsonville Music Festival
● Kurt Vile
● Bob Mould
● Joe Mullins
● Todd Snider

Stuart’s Opera House
● Columbus Symphony -rescheduled for March 2021
● ABC Players’ 2020 season
Rental Events:
● Valentour Wedding
● ATCO Idol
● Schmitzer Wedding
● Factory Street Dance Studio and Moving Parts
● HCOM Dinner
● Perry Wedding
● McDonald Wedding
● Osteopathic Heritage Foundation Meeting
● Recovery 360 Event

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
What the loss of Stuart’s would mean economically to our tight community ecosystem.
Where will the children go for free arts programming (and food and hygiene and center with trusted adults).
Death of toursim.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

If we are successful in our work we lose the advantage of language like “underserved” “poorest” “least” and “lacking” – but we fulfill our mission to celebrate the music, promote our region’s local assets and create an environment where music and culture are cultivated and celebrated, just the same. We fulfill this purpose when we engage in activities that support our mission but, how do we stay relevant, proactive, and worthy of support at a time when we cannot gather– the primary means to fulling our mission? Professional development will increase our capacity to serve our community. 


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Emily Prince, Education Director/Grants Coordinator

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Workforce Wayne, Inc. dba Wayne Pike Workforce Alliance

Total Qualifying Score: 10
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Workforce Wayne, Inc. dba Wayne Pike Workforce Alliance
Hawley, Wayne County, Pennsylvania 18428
570-780-2617
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Wayne
State (ARC Region) Pennsylvania


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Wayne Pike Workforce Alliance serves as an intermediary to identify, create, and provide educational opportunities that build our workforce and support lifelong learning.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Community Education Council (PA Dept. of Education designation – 9 Councils in the Commonwealth)

  1.  Supports program development in a community based business incubator
  2. Develops, Brokers, Implements programs and services to increase knowledge/skills/abilities of residents
  3. Investment of Partnership to the core infrastructure areas that impact the labor force
  4. Investment of Partnership to the integration of “place” and placemaking importance to the labor force (maintenance/in-migration)
  5. Develops, Brokers, Implements programs and services from kindergarten to lifelong learning

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 9/14 14 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 9/37 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $2,332,421/$2,100,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $1,294,440 / $1,243,054

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $2,332,421 / $2,100,000

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($N/A)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($N/A)
Received From: N/A   Date Received: N/A
For What Purpose(s): N/A

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Delayed education and training – time deficit for regroup/retool approached to progress.

Pivot & Prosper is the positive impact.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Reduction in labor force / mobility of unemployed / opportunity employment decision making
In ability to expend federal funding for education & training
Contraction of large industry sector / out migration

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

People – Place – Policy – Partnership

Participation in a active cohort will glean a variety of perspective on current status, future planning

 


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? Yes

List of Organizations in Proposed Cohort:
Mary Beth Wood, Wayne Economic Development Corporation
Deb Gillette, Chamber of the Northern Pocono’s
Ryanne Jennings, Wayne Community Foundation (pending)

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Lucyann Vierling, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

United Way of Central WV

Total Qualifying Score: 4
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

United Way of Central WV
Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia 25301
304-340-3544
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Kanawha
State (ARC Region) West Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

United Way of Central West Virginia established a COVID–19 Response & Recovery Fund in early March 2020.  As a result of your generosity, we were able to make grants totaling over $150,000 to 50 nonprofit agencies in Kanawha, Putnam, Boone, Clay and Logan counties.  Since then we’ve been working  24 hours a day, 7 days a week to identify needs, fill service gaps and be a reliable source of assistance to our communities.  We continue to deliver essential supplies to hundreds of families. We’re still feeding thousands through food distribution events. We’re keeping the lights on,  water flowing and families safely housed. We’re providing reliable transportation to those in recovery. Calls and texts to WV 2-1-1 for information and referrals continue to climb. And with the support of partner agencies, we’re helping our most vulnerable populations with basic needs. As new challenges unfold, United Way remains your trusted resource of resources.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

What we do as United Way does align with the goals of the ARC to work tirelessly increase the education, knowledge, skills, and health of residents to work and succeed in Appalachia. Without foundational support of basic needs, we know that residents lose hope.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 17/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 18/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $4,171,274/$4,171,274

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $3,620,583 / $3,809,377

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $4,171,274 / $4,171,274

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($118,900)
Received From: US Small Business Administration c/o BBT now Truist   Date Received: 4/21/2020
For What Purpose(s): Paycheck Protection Program

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

The pandemic has created opportunity to align more closely with agencies we support and to rely heavily on our staff and volunteers to get the job done. Negatively, the current situation continues to hamper our fundraising efforts, as we realize more and more that a return to “business as usual” is not on the horizon for many medium to large companies. Special events, large gatherings, open houses are all things of the past. Making sure families remain fed, housed and safe is the present.

 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Economic downturn in counties we serve, downsizing across companies
Survival of smaller non-profit agencies
Increase demand for services

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

The opportunity to share best practices and learn new methods will surely refresh our staff to prepare for a tough 4th quarter and even harder year ahead.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Kristi Wheeler, Resource Development DIrector

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Wayne Economic Development Corporation

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Wayne Economic Development Corporation
Honesdale, Wayne County, Pennsylvania 18431
570-253-2537
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Wayne
State (ARC Region) Pennsylvania


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

WEDCO will assist both public and private sectors in growing economic prosperity and improving the quality of life of the people of Wayne County.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

As the lead economic development organization in a rural county, WEDCO has a broad focus.  We are involved in projects aligned with all five ARC goals.  For example, with ARC assistance, WEDCO facilitated the development of a business incubator, which serves as an entrepreneurial hub and offers access to technology not available elsewhere to the public.  Standing up a successful incubator in a rural county took involvement from all levels of government and community support.   Since 2016, over 295 training programs have been offered with 2,216 participants, and over 20 jobs created.

Years ago, WEDCO recognized that workforce development is the “people side of economic development” and shepherded the formation of the Wayne Pike Workforce Alliance, a state-designated Community Education Council.  All of our development projects incorporate the Workforce Alliance.

One of WEDCO’s primary focuses is infrastructure development.  Again, with ARC assistance, we developed the 252-acre Sterling Business & Technology Park with the goal of diversifying our economy through the attraction of higher-wage industries.  We are also currently assisting with the construction of natural gas distribution lines in one of our small communities and broadband expansion within the County.

In the last decade WEDCO started to work on a problem that plagues many rural counties:  lack of capacity within our organizations.  To that end, we helped foster Wayne Tomorrow!, an entrepreneurial ecosystem model based on the premise that all organizations have a role in economic and community development. With strong leadership from our County Commissioners, over 50 individuals and organizations have created a shared development vision and meet monthly to advance strategic initiatives.  An example is the Recovery-to-Work Ecosystem at SCI Waymart, which was just awarded a $1.5 million ARC POWER grant for the treatment & rehabilitation facility.

Our collaborative approach is why our three main development organizations – the Wayne Pike Workforce Alliance, The Chamber of the Northern Poconos, and WEDCO – are applying as a cohort for this training opportunity.  We would also like to include two smaller organizations – The Greater Honesdale Partnership and Wayne County Community Foundation if possible.  It is paradoxical that organizations so crucial to advancement of our county find themselves at risk due to COVID-19.  Technical support to assist with our sustainability is critical not only to our organizations, but to Wayne County as well.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(6)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 3/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $1,859,760/$2,115,760

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $889,245 / $1,148,406

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $1,859,760 / $2,115,760

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($50,000)
Received From: Wayne County Commissioners   Date Received: Pending
For What Purpose(s): WEDCO received funding through the County CARES Block Grant to help sustain operations and cover costs associated with safety compliance.

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Our operation revenue is down due to decreased membership support, inability to hold our annual fundraiser, and decreases in state budget allocations to economic development organizations and programs. Because of budget uncertainties, we have held off filling a vacant position, which has detracted from our ability to operate efficiently.  Looking towards 2021, initial projections are a 12% decrease in revenue to support operations.  Additionally, the general state of the economy impacts our business development projects (Sterling Business & Technology Park and the Stourbridge Project) and their overall sustainability.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Need to diversify our funding sources – we are too dependent on one source (our County.)
Need to strengthen back office support (not enough help).
We need to strengthen our cash reserves (if we plan to survive a multi-year pandemic.)

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Participation would bring these problems from the back of our minds to the forefront.  We are so busy servicing our businesses and communities, that our organizational needs often come second (or third…).  Confronting our issues with professional guidance will go a long way towards improving our operations and sustainability.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? Yes

List of Organizations in Proposed Cohort:
Workforce Wayne, Inc. dba Wayne Pike Workforce Alliance
The Chamber of the Northern Poconos

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Mary Beth Wood, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Big Sandy College Educational Foundation, Inc

Total Qualifying Score: 5
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : No (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Big Sandy College Educational Foundation, Inc
Prestonsburg, Floyd County, Kentucky 41653
606-886-7358
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Floyd
State (ARC Region) Kentucky


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The mission of the Big Sandy College Educational Foundation, Inc. is to promote the Big Sandy Community and Technical College (BSCTC) through enhancing and providing for academic excellence in the form of scholarships and any other endeavors which will benefit the students in the Big Sandy and eastern Kentucky.  BSCTC is one of sixteen two-year, open-admissions community colleges of the Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS). BSCTC offers pathways that lead to certificates, diplomas, associate degrees (associate in arts, associate in science, and associate in applied science), along with a robust network of workforce training opportunities. BSCTC currently offers 28 academic and technical programs, along with more than 200 industry-recognized credentials. The college plays a vital role in strengthening eastern Kentucky’s economy, training the local workforce, and providing access to education that students could otherwise not afford. The Big Sandy College Educational Foundation is the primary vehicle for fundraising and financial support from the college’s alumni, friends, and local businesses who value a strong, affordable college education in the counties of the Big Sandy Region (Floyd, Johnson, Magoffin, Martin, and Pike counties). The mission of the Foundation aligns with BSCTC’s mission. Further, the college employs the Foundation staff, which includes a manager of advancement and an executive director.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Five distressed counties in Central Appalachia (Floyd, Johnson, Magoffin, Martin, and Pike counties in Kentucky) make up the Big Sandy Region.  The primary purpose of the Big Sandy College Educational Foundation, Inc. is to facilitate fundraising and financial support for BSCTC.  Therefore, the Foundation directly addresses Goal 2 of ARC’s strategic plan – increase the education, knowledge, skills, and health of residents to work and succeed in Appalachia.  In particular, the Foundation is the primary vehicle for alumni and friends’ local philanthropic efforts and a source of scholarships for students to attend the local community college.  Additionally, the Foundation fundraises to support faculty development, new training facilities, and new college programs.  Its efforts also help provide outreach to the region’s residents and K-12 students through the East Kentucky Science Center and Varia Planetarium, a regional hub for STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) education in eastern Kentucky.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 0/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 0/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $130,000/$80,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $80,003 / $52,545

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $130,000 / $80,000

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

The coronavirus pandemic has significantly impacted the philanthropic efforts of the Big Sandy Educational Foundation, Inc.  A key strategy of the Foundation’s fundraising efforts in the past has been a series of well-attended events and activities that included a Golf Scramble, a Gala event, outreach visits, and other face-to-face activities.  However, with the gathering and social distance restrictions related to COVID 19  and bankrupted sponsors, the events have been canceled.   Additionally, the Foundation has seen a significant decline in contributions due to donors giving less and the inability to reach donors.

The coronavirus pandemic has capsized business as usual for BSCTC. BSCTC found it necessary to shift business functions and learning to remote.  Along with the challenges of remote learning environments and lack of adequate support for faculty and students, the institution grapples with the financial challenges of lower enrollment.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
The pandemic impacts donor relations. Events are the primary fundraising activity, and the Foundation is unable to continue events due to restrictions related to COVID19 and the resulting economic impact on the region. Additionally, it is difficult to foster donor relationships. Our donors value face-to-face interaction and a personal touch.
The pandemic impacts board member involvement. The Foundation relies on its board members to raise money. However, with events canceled, the board members seem reluctant to embrace the role of spokesperson and fundraiser in other ways. The board meetings have been canceled since the pandemic began.
The Foundation has an aging donor base and philanthropic involvement of millennial donors is minimal. A diversification of donor base is difficult to achieve in our small rural communities.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Fundraising in rural communities, particularly in Central Appalachia, has a unique set of challenges that have been exacerbated by COVID19.  We believe that participation in the Appalachia Non-Profit Resource Center will provide us with a new perspective, along with valuable tools and resources for fundraising in the post-pandemic environment.  We are particularly interested in looking at ways to engage philanthropic organizations outside of our region.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Kelli Martin, Manager of Advancement

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

Back to List of Applicants

APPLICANT

The Ithaca Voice

Total Qualifying Score: 6
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $100,000 to $250,000 – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

The Ithaca Voice
Ithaca, Tompkins County, New York 14850
607-391-0329
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Tompkins
State (ARC Region) New York


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The Ithaca Voice is a nonprofit digital news site with a mission to improve civic and political understanding in Ithaca and Tompkins County by publishing and sustaining in-depth, educational, rigorous, timely, and ethical journalism that all residents can access free of charge online.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

We believe nonprofit, nonpartisan news creates public trust, with a mission to serve communities rather than generate private wealth. We seek to build community ties, inspire and inform people with news independent of any influence.
 
Local journalism is important because it kickstarts/helps to create dialogue, holds everyone accountable, and creates understanding – free of charge. access for all
Local journalism is more important than ever because across the country small newsrooms and organizations are disappearing – creating news “voids” that directly impact those communities.
 We seek to build community ties, inspire and inform people with news independent of any influence. In June 2014, a group of motivated young journalists and entrepreneurs founded The Ithaca Voice to give the greater Ithaca area something better: founder Jeff Stein began a tradition of covering stories that are “in-depth, enlightening, engaging and—above all—local.”

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 4/4 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 3/4 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $180,000/$160,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $170,000 / $140,000

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $180,000 / $160,000

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($26,500)
Received From: M&T   Date Received: 3/25/2020
For What Purpose(s): payroll

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

We have seen a decline in one of our main revenue streams – advertising and sponsorship. We have served our community greatly during this pandemic with up to date COIVID19 coverage – driving more traffic than ever to our website.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
sponsors / advertisers dropping out
accomplishing diversifying our revenue streams
individual supporters dropping out

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Your support can help the Ithaca Voice to be able to continue to pursue our important journalistic mission. Our community needs the news. And now, more than ever, the news needs your support.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Mission & Operations

Course #2 Choice: 2-Short-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Dustin Patte, Interim Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Castle Shannon Revitalization Corporation

Total Qualifying Score: 5
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : No (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Castle Shannon Revitalization Corporation
Castle Shannon, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 15234
412-628-8115
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Allegheny
State (ARC Region) Pennsylvania


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The Castle Shannon Revitalization Corporation serves as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation that supports local businesses, provides growth and development opportunities and creates incentives, while promoting our unique, vibrant community.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

The Castle Shannon Revitalization Corporation (CSRC) is exploring how to connect our business owners and entrepreneurs more seamlessly with the regional economy in ways that will foster a strong entrepreneurial support network.

  • Currently, we subsidize the membership fees for our community’s business owners who participate in the local eforever (Entrepreneurs Forever, formerly Mansmann Foundation) program.
  • The CSRC has been instrumental in guiding local businesses to COVID-19 resources, such as grant or loan programs.
  • The CSRC is always seeking effective ways to encourage some of our businesses to take part in ecommerce, and others to expand their online presence.
  • The CSRC administers PA Department of Community and Economic Development funding to assist business owners with building facade improvements.
  • Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, the CSRC  sponsored a “Watch the Store” Program, which matched local high schoolers with businesses to learn the ins-and-outs of small business ownership, while the business owners provided mentorship.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 0/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 0/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $4,000/$6,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $12,000 / $3,000

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $4,000 / $6,000

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

The COVID-19 pandemic has made it impossible to hold any events. Our volunteer base, already small, has vanished almost entirely. The CSRC has been unable to add Board members, expand committee membership, or start any meaningful fundraising efforts. Our outreach has been almost entirely online, seemingly to no avail, as there is a low online participation rate. The CSRC must streamline communication and management procedures, processes, planning and implementation methods, and operations, in order to strengthen the organization so its core mission of can be realized.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Restricted or decreased participation in the organization by key members will limit outreach efforts, community involvement, business and entrepreneurial support, and revitalization endeavors.
Lack of financial planning and robust, thoughtful participation in the financial planning processes will lead to this organization’s dissolution.
Lack of events that serve as fundraising vehicles will also limit outreach efforts, community involvement, business and entrepreneurial support, and revitalization endeavors.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

I will be more adept at crafting policies and procedures for the management of the organization and I will be able to confidently and  knowledgeably assist in financial planning processes; both of which will increase my ability to find new ways to supplement fundraising efforts in the absence of events.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Mission & Operations

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Krista Mosher Mosher, Keystone Community Coordinator / Main St. Manager

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Envision Williamston

Total Qualifying Score: 5
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : No (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Envision Williamston
Williamston, Anderson County, South Carolina 29697
864-518-1645
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Anderson
State (ARC Region) South Carolina


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Envision Williamston is a community based program designed to enhance the identity and heritage of the Williamston community by working with both the public and private sectors of our town to restore vitality and ensure economic stability through concentrated efforts in organization, promotion, design and business development.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Envision Williamston strives to tap into the potential of current community members while reaching out to entrepreneurs looking to plant roots. We design plans to utilize, improve, and provide stewardship for existing resources (to include natural resources). We remain friendly to small business leaders and prepare for growth and success.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $20,000/$16,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $18,435 / $9,927

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $20,000 / $16,000

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

The need to follow safety protocols has eliminated our ability to hold events. We had a strong lineup of annual events that serve well as economic boosts to the community and the organization.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Economic health of our current small businesses
Slowed growth of new businesses coming to town to get established
Funding challenges brought about by a halting of events

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Information and new strategies is always a good kick-starter for ideas and creativity. I hope to also gain contacts for networking. Coming into this new role during a pandemic is a challenge and I am seeking as many tools as possible. It’s vital for me to have a maximum of resources in order to serve the community and help our businesses and citizens thrive.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 B: 5-Week Course (Mar. 1, 2021-April 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Lisa Cope Cope, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

FoodWorks Alliance, LLC

Total Qualifying Score: 5
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : No (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

FoodWorks Alliance, LLC
Zanesville,, Muskingum County, Ohio 43701
740-868-7342
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Muskingum
State (ARC Region) Ohio


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

FoodWorks Alliance is a non-profit established to help grow and sustain food businesses in Southeastern Ohio.  We offer business services and provide top quality business resources as well as a licensed commercial kitchen for production.  This year we established a DBA, Sweet Life Baking Company which expands our services to on the job trainings for women in recovery.  The women employed are part of the development of the bakery from recipe development to packing and shipping.  The importance of this addition is that our partner Naomi House is the only recovery house in the area that allows the women to keep their young children with them during their journey to sobriety, thus avoiding the challenge of getting the children back for social services after they have completed their program.

COVID-19 has been a real factor in serving our clients, especially the restaurant, bed and breakfast, meal prep clients and food wagon.  In addtion the bakery started recipe development in February and was not able to start sales until August 15th.  At FWA we also offer Servsafe Classes to support our restaurants and add some revenue to our bottom line.  At this time it is still very difficult for the small establishments to send and pay for their employees for this required training.  This has put some of them in jeopardy and we have lost several thousand dollars in revenue.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

#1.  FoodWorks Alliance’s mission is to establish and help grow sustainable food businesses in Southeastern Ohio.  We were established in 2015 as a part of the Muskingum County Business Incubator (MCBI).  In 2017 we became our own non-profit.  We continue to partner with some of the past members of MCBI as well as the Small Business Development Center to offer workshops and professional services.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/5 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 0/2 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $73,000/$75,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $58,367 / $74,511

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $73,000 / $75,000

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Although the income of FWA is $35,000 more than last year the difference is grant dollars awarded prior to the March shutdown and are allocated for mostly training labor for the bakery and for the kitchen to produce meals for our Hunger Network and  hot meal programs.  The income from the member clients has  been down due to the shut down in March and April and their lack of sales.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
We have been able to pay our bills the last two years but have not been able to grow our cash. There just isn’t any extra for tough times.
Helping our clients get back on their feet and grow their sales.
Things break down. There is now extra to replace faulty equipment and without our kettles we can not serve the clients and lose revenue.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

The research for the kitchen was done back in 2012 – 2014.  Things that was assummed in our business plan did not happen.  We have grown to 15 clients in 2017 but seem to stay at that level.  Our extra income streams are still needing plans for growth.  FWA needs to reevaluate the business plan and look for additional opportunity to grow.  At this time as the director, I only charge $525 per month for my services.  That has been my decision however moving forward FWA needs an income to support a Director at a normal pay scale of $40K – $45K  per year.  We have a new management assistant and it would be a great advantage to have them go through this program along with myself.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Short-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Carol Humphreys, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Community Action Agency of South Alabama

Total Qualifying Score: 4
County (ARC Region): No
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Community Action Agency of South Alabama
Daphne, Other County, Alabama 36526
251-626-2646
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Other
State (ARC Region) Alabama


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

As a non-profit business/organization, we are charged to provide programs and services which promote and create self-sufficiency to individuals, families, and communities.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

In alignment of Appalachian Regional Commission’s strategic plan goal number two our organization also addresses the increase of education, knowledge, skills and health of residents to work and succeed in all of our seven county service areas which are Baldwin, Clarke, Conecuh, Escambia, Marengo, Monroe and Wilcox. Our programs empower low-to-moderate income families and individuals to move from poverty towards economic stability and self-sufficiency. Our current processes facilitate customers’ moving towards stability and self-sufficiency through case management using a results oriented, strength-based model that creates individual and family assessments that identify barriers to self-sufficiency across ten dimensions of well-being (income, employment, education, housing, health, food and nutrition, childcare, transportation, family relations, and community relations). Once barriers are identified, CAASA customers in partnership with our staff identify their priorities and goals for achieving stability and self-sufficiency. The assessments measure a family’s self-sufficiency status across each dimension on a five-point scale and can show the gains families make in achieving self-sufficiency over time. We identify these areas of opportunities through our Community Needs Assessment which is a comprehensive document that is compiled with data and research performed every three years and updated ever following year by our agency to gather information about the needs in our communities that we can provide resources for. The Community Needs Assessment allows us to make the greatest impact in our strategy map of eliminating poverty and creating stability. We will continue dedicating ourselves to fight against poverty by working to create an environment that encourages opportunities for everyone. We are guided by the following principles as we address challenges in poverty and “helping people, changing lives”:

  • Poverty is unacceptable, painful and far-reaching;
  • Community empowerment is essential;
  • Volunteerism is valuable in all aspects of service;
  • Partnerships fuel program success;
  • Teamwork results in effective consensus building.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 25/4 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 22/1 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $8,715,901/$8,715,901

Q6. Fiscal Year: October-September

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $4,878,280 / $4,878,280

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $8,715,901 / $8,715,901

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($1,241,630)
Received From: Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs (ADECA)   Date Received: 7-01-2020
For What Purpose(s): To assist customers with COVID related challenges and to make facility modifications ensuring that we are meeting CDC guidelines.

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

COVID-19 has impacted some areas of our organization and daily operations, such as allowing customers to enter our facilities for appointments, decreased appointment scheduling, staffing shortages, technology limitations with clients and direct accessibility removed.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Staffing
Technology Infrastructure Capabilities
Public Awareness /Case Management – Training

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

By participating in this program it will assist us in identifying the key issues that needs to be addressed in the immediate future, re-evaluating our current programs and operations against pre-determined objective criteria’s and creating a roadmap of success on how to embrace change individually and as an agency.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Mission & Operations

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Jennifer King King, Planning and Marketing Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Consortium for Entrepreneurship Education (EntreEd)

Total Qualifying Score: 10
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Consortium for Entrepreneurship Education (EntreEd)
Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia 25311
304-344-8577
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Kanawha
State (ARC Region) West Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

EntreEd champions entrepreneurship education, cultivating students for a prosperous future. Through leadership, professional development, advocacy, and networking, EntreEd curates educational practices and programs that forge entrepreneurial capabilities in all students.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

EntreEd helps K-12 schools become America’s Entrepreneurial Schools – a designation that means the school has delivered entrepreneurship education to every student in the building during a school year. We help schools accomplish this goal through teacher training and project support. Our overall goal is to better prepare all students for career opportunities in entrepreneurship, allowing them to become productive citizens while remaining in their communities. This process helps strengthen the local economy, increases the education, knowledge and skills of the young residents and builds the skills and capacity of the next generation of Appalachian youth. We believe we address Goals 1,2, and 5.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 4/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 4/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $981,000/$854,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $805,000 / $703,000

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $981,000 / $854,000

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

A major portion of our work, prior to COVID was face-to-face teacher training in cooperation with local community colleges, resulting in schools delivering entrepreneurship education to every student in the school building. Due to COVID, both k-12 schools and community colleges were closed. Reaching teachers for training and helping them deliver eship education to their students became impossible. In addition, we had to cancel our EntreEd Forum, scheduled for November. Finally, delivering eship education used to be a high priority for many schools. The effects of COVID caused it to be a much lower priority for administrators and teachers. Also, the conversion to virtual instruction also effected the ability to deliver eship education to students in an online format.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Developing the technology expertise to achieve our goals in the new world of virtual instruction.
Keeping entrepreneurship education on the front burner of school priorities.
Finding revenue streams to support our work.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

I hope to identify others in need of, or willing to provide, technical assistance in virtual delivery of entrepreneurial content. I also hope to receive assistance in identifying funding sources and income streams to support our work. The COVID work environment makes it difficult to network with others that share the same interests or challenges. I hope this program will help identify others we can collaborate with to solve mutual problems and achieve mutual goals.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Short-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Gene Coulson Coulson, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Archway Station

Total Qualifying Score: 4
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Archway Station
Cumberland, Allegany County, Maryland 21502
301-777-1700
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Allegany
State (ARC Region) Maryland


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Archway Station’s mission is to provide psychiatric rehabilitation services to; adults recovering from serious and persistent mental illness; adults with intellectual and/or developmental challenges; and children and adolescents overcoming serious emotional and/or behavior problems.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Archway Station is committed to helping to bring change to those in service.  The foundation of all services is our belief that children and adults using services are first and foremost people.  The success of our services rests on the honoring and celebration of our shared humanity.  We work to meet people where they are in their recovery and move them towards an improved life with more natural supports, so we work to enhance their education, knowledge, skills, and improved overall health.  We try to link people to services and supports that foster improved living conditions and circumstances.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 83/29 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 88/42 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $5,287,500.00/$5,211,750.00

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $5,189,275.57 / $5,177,389.39

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $5,287,500.00 / $5,211,750.00

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($827,403.40)
Received From: Federal Sources   Date Received: 6/30/20
For What Purpose(s): Provider Relief Funds (PPE) and Payroll Protection Program

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Archway Station has been in business for 40 years providing residential and in-home supports.  We had to close several programs in that we could not provide the necessary services which also resulted in the furlough of some employees.  Archway in its history had never had furloughs.  We further downsized and had to attrition some positions.  The income in several programs has suffered due to having to provide services telephonic.  When people had unlimited plans it was not a problem but those who have limited access to governmental phones are not willing to utilize their minutes of service for our contacts and supports.

We also have persons who use our services who have increased mental health problems resulting in an improved need for services.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
We worry about the health and safety of those served. We have had one suicide and one natural cause (unknown) death during COVID.
We have lost service users resulting in reduced revenue but concern for those people not receiving services.
We are having problems retaining staff due to concerns of steady employment.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

I am familiar with ARC and the region served and the overall economic impact the Appalachian funding has provided for distressed regions.  We have been working to strengthen our partnerships with other organizations to get a greater ability to serve the community.  We hope to learn of funding methodologies that serve nonprofits within the region from those experts who have provided more diversified services in other parts of the region and in other impoverished communities.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? Yes

List of Organizations in Proposed Cohort:
Resources for Independence, Cumberland, Maryland
Others have been contacted.

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Jim Raley, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

The Discovery Center of the Southern Tier

Total Qualifying Score: 8
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

The Discovery Center of the Southern Tier
Binghamton, Broome County, New York 13903
607-773-8661
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Broome
State (ARC Region) New York


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The Discovery Center of the Southern Tier is committed to creating an environment that fosters the intellectual, physical and
emotional well-being of children through education, participatory exhibits and programs.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

The Discovery Center of the Southern Tier is invested in the education of Appalachia through our licensed child care programs, including our preschool program as well as after school care. We are committed to providing a space where children can learn through play and it is our hope that every child that walks through our doors will use our unique space to think critically. We are a hands on facility that focuses on fostering intellectual, physical and emotional well being of the children of the Southern Tier.

In addition to our commitment to education, we also use our space to highlight our region. Each one of our participatory exhibits shines a spotlight on local businesses, culture and nature. We collaborate with local businesses and organizations to make our space truly one of a kind.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 11/19 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 14/33 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $775,550.06/$929,829.27

Q6. Fiscal Year: June 1 – May 31

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $863,146.20 / $925,378.98

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $775,550.06 / $929,829.27

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($16,539.64)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($)
Received From: City of Binghamton   Date Received: Ongoing
For What Purpose(s): Insurance and utilities

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

The Museum is currently generating little to no revenue as a direct result of COVID-19. We had to lay off the majority of our staff and though some have returned, we are still not fully staffed. Currently our Museum is operating on limited capacity and only open 4 days a week after being closed for several months. We were fortunate enough to offer childcare services for essential workers at the onset of COVID-19 however that also closed for several months. Fortunately, now we are able to offer childcare services however due to COVID-19, enrollment has been down compared to previous years. 

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Another regional pause due to an uptick in cases, which would result in the closure of the museum
School closures impacting our childcare program
Loss of donors/members due to regional unemployment numbers

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

This program would help grant us the tools to create sustainability for our organization both in the long term and short term as well as create a better plan for Development through fundraising. We have been able to adapt our operations slightly, providing resources virtually, however a long term plan would be extremely beneficial to our organization. We want to provide resources to our community whether they can be here in person or not.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? Yes

List of Organizations in Proposed Cohort:
NYSARC Inc., Broome Chenango Tioga Chapter, DBA ACHIEVE

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 B: 5-Week Course (Mar. 1, 2021-April 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Mallory Evans, Director of Development

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

West Virginia Institute for Spirituality

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : No (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

West Virginia Institute for Spirituality
Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia 25311
724-771-0868
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Kanawha
State (ARC Region) West Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The West Virginia Institute for Spirituality is dedicated to providing space and opportunities for deepening mindfulness, prayer practice, interior peace, and for integrating moral and ethical values

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

WE are building the capacity and skills of current and next-generation leaders and our organization is trying to innovate by adding addition technology offerings, collaborate throughout Appalacia with the black coalition, the WV council of churches and we serve the economically deprived through scholarships for those who cannot pay.

 

 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/2 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/12 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $160, 000/$200000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $267191 / $205706

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $160, 000 / $200000

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($28000)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

We offer retreat accommodations for 15 and because we have a 98 year old resident have terminated all in house offerings.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Income
Fundraising
Recruiting new clients

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

The program would assist us with marketing and fundraising ideas and help us to help our clients.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: David Lake, President of the Board of Directors

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Black Sheep Brick Oven Bakery

Total Qualifying Score: 3
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: Yes – 0
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : No (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Black Sheep Brick Oven Bakery
Jackhorn, Letcher County, Kentucky 41825
960-667-1702
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Letcher
State (ARC Region) Kentucky


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

To provide low coast family friendly entertainment and educational opportunities.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Black Sheep Bakery is a is a 29 month old social enterprise. We hire folks coming out of incarceration. We presently have three paid employees and a few volunteers. We are the funding stream for Hemphill Community Center, a 501(C)3. We are a culture bearing organization. We just invested in campus wifi so the children without internet could come and do their school work. We have constructed a pavillion where folks may market their wares if they have things the produce.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: Yes

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 0/3 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 0/1 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $34000/$28000

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $23000 / $23000

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $34000 / $28000

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($1000.00)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

We are just feeling the effects of the pandemic now. Our business is almost non-existent now that the numbers have escalated here in our county and our community. Its pretty frightening to think we might not be able to stay our course. We were doing so good even after the pandemic started.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Payroll
Utilities
Keeping the staff and the customers safe

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Possibly. Hopefully. Yes. It could help us plan and be able to sustain beyond the meager finances that cause us to dip into our own pockets sometimes to pay utilities and wages. The wages for our workers are paramount. We want a living wage and full time employment for our workers asap.

 


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Mission & Operations

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Gwen Johnson, Secretary/ Bakery Manager

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Greater Honesdale Partnership

Total Qualifying Score: 3
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : No (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Greater Honesdale Partnership
Honesdale, Wayne County, Pennsylvania 18431
570-253-5492
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Wayne
State (ARC Region) Pennsylvania


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Mission Statement:

Greater Honesdale Partnership works to promote, build, and invest in our community.

 

Promote all greater Honesdale and our members.

Build a flourishing community through sound communication where we can grow and evolve together while maintaining its authenticity.

Invest by continuing to attract funding on behalf of our community.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

1 & 2 As the Honesdale Borough’s economic developer GHP helps mentors, grows, and invests in the Honesdale economy by providing grant information, continued education experiences, networking, and providing skill enhancements of our local business owners and future owners.

3. GHP is in process of a downtown Honesdale revitalization plan with a consultant hired through LSA – Monroe grant money totaling $90,000. This will begin the streetscape improvements making walking and biking safer, restore business facades and create additional parking fulfilling local zoning allowing the upstair apartments to be utilized.

5.GHP is in the initial stages of building a Retail Businesss Incubator. This will provide space for up to 3 years to future business owners who need help with business plans, marketing and mentoring. This will help next generation business leaders to work in the same space collaborating and learning from one another.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(6)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $62125./$62125.

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $52317 / $57001.99

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $62125. / $62125.

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($15000.)
Received From: Wayne County Cares   Date Received: 10/23/2020
For What Purpose(s): Payroll and Expenses

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

The GHP primarily funded through membership dues has been left financially vulnerable by the COVID-19 crisis. Many business owners are apprehensive to spend their money on a membership. The fees collected through membership accounts for $48,150 of the annual budget. As you can see losing 50 members totaling $12,500. is a quarter of our annual budget.

Our 2020 calendar had seminars and networking events scheduled for every month with Sidewalk Sales and Fireworks as minor events and Harvest & Heritage Days and Winter Wonderland as major events. We have heard from sponsors that they would like their money transferred to 2021. The money collected thus far is going towards our operating budget. We are projected to lose $7,900 in fundraising pending the cancelation of our major events.

The community tourism/business brochure distributed to rest areas from Delaware to New York, funded through a Wayne County award of $5000 is printed in February and distributed throughout the year by Getaways on Display. The printing was paid for in March of 2020 although distribution fees are incurred quarterly. As of July 27, 2020, the awarded $5000 has been rescinded by the Wayne County Tax Board due to many event cancelations.  This leaves our community vulnerable to the loss of valuable tourism.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
I don’t know how I’m going to continue the high level of educational and discounted services normally provided due to lack of fundraising.
I’m not sure I can fulfill the promises I have made in 2019, such as being Keystone Designated due to lack of organizational financial sustainability.
Fundraising is particularly hard as I don’t want to ask business owners for any of their profits.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

As the Executive Director, I can use the information on short-term financial management, long-term financial management, mission and operations, and fundraising in every aspect of my business. Learning long-term and short term financial management will help teach me how to maintain GHP’s organizational sustainability. Sustainability helps qualify Honesdale for a Keystone Community Designation. Designation is an opportunity for targeted investment and development including the identification of specific needs for investment and/or development and the design and implementation of a strategy to address those needs.

The fundraising information can help teach me to tactfully ask for funding to continue the educational services we consistently provide. These educational opportunities will help keep our business community strong and grow.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? Yes

List of Organizations in Proposed Cohort:
Wayne Economic Development
The Chamber of the Northern Poconos
Wayne Pike Workforce Alliance

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Mission & Operations

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Lisa Burns Burns, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

Back to List of Applicants

APPLICANT

This applicant hasn’t been qualified or been given a qualifying score.

CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

FoundersForge (previously Startup Tri-Cities)
Johnson City, Washington County, Tennessee 37601
423-220-4501
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Washington
State (ARC Region) Tennessee


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

FoundersForge’s Mission:
We believe in the Underdog Entrepreneurs in the Appalachian Highlands and helping them on their Startup Journeys. Our mission is to be the catalyst behind all successful Startups in the Appalachian Highlands.

This is Accomplished By:
– Entrepreneurship community development with high-impact programming that teaches the concepts that Entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley and Boulder (CO) use every day
-Technology centric workforce development and training for those interested in these fields
-Entrepreneurship Community Development through events and utilizing the creative spaces in our region to bring people together

Our region is ready for new opportunities that will change their lives and the community around them.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Founders Forge’s mission and goals align closely with most (1,2, 4, & 5) of the ARC’s current strategic plan. Here is why:

  1. FoundersForge’s mission is to foster Entrepreneurial growth by growing our Startup ecosystem, providing high-impact events/training, and utilizing the creative spaces to bring people together that wouldn’t normally have the opportunity to meet. This has fostered the Entrepreneurial growth in Boulder, Silicon Valley, Greenville (SC), Atlanta, and other cities across the country. We know this works because the FoundersForge board comes from many of these regions and ecosystems.To date, we’re already known for hosting our region’s largest Startup Pitch competition, as well as the Small Business Festival for the last 4 years. We also plan and host workshops throughout the year to teach people the concepts of Entrepreneurship.

    And we did this all through a volunteer effort by the local Startup community. But it’s not enough. We chose to form a 501(c)3 to fundraise and operate beyond what volunteers can provide. Our region needs strong intervention with our Startups, education, workforce development, and job opportunities to strengthen our region’s economic opportunities and potential. We’ve come so far already, now imagine what we can do as a fully funded organization.

  2. There is a belief in this region that Entrepreneurship “can’t be done here.” Unfortunately, our region doesn’t know that it was built on top of Entrepreneurship and innovation and that it is already happening here. Since we’ve become a 501(c)3, we’ve indexed 39 high-growth Startups in our region. As we continue to showcase these individuals and companies, we are changing this mindset.Our region also lacks a technology and Entrepreneurship centric education. East Tennessee State University is just now putting together an Entrepreneurship minor program, and we’re helping them create this.

    In the United States, there is a lack of software developers and the ones our local colleges train have to leave to find jobs. We need to train and re-train our workforce in technology jobs to meet this demand while creating new job opportunities in technology, software consulting, and other innovative fields. We are currently building up partnerships and fundraising to open The Forge Coding Academy and The Forge DevShop to attach this problem on both fronts.

  3. While this goal does not align with FoundersForge’s mission, we are continuing to promote and partner with all fiber internet endeavors, especially in rural areas. This connectivity will open the door to new innovation coming from an untapped rural perspective.
  4. The mountains in the Appalachian Highlands is an incredible draw to outdoor enthusiasts. Entrepreneurs love the outdoors and it has become a requirement to have access to hiking, biking, and other adventure sports that our region easily provides. By leveraging our natural resources, we can continue to attract new talent to the region.
    Our natural resources also create new opportunities in in outdoor recreation Entrepreneurship. We are already seeing this with local Startups like Vayska.com and ConnectOutdoors.com in our region. We plan to keep investing time and energy into these types of companies because we know that the best way to protect our natural resources is to help others experience them responsibly.
  5. Currently, ~45% of our region is categorized as ALICE households. This clearly needs to change. In the more rural areas around us, coal and railroad job loss has had a massive negative impact on Appalachia as well as our region. We plan to create new opportunities through software development and Entrepreneurship training for anyone with an interest in these fields.

Many companies need basic, entry-level software coders to help build and maintain their existing infrastructure. They don’t all need software engineers. The demand in the software development field has created a new opportunity that makes what you have already built matter more than a specific degree.

As the demand for software developers grows, it’s critical that our local workforce has the opportunity to be trained in these fields. Software development jobs are now being called the construction jobs of the future and every company, school, and government entity is going to need at least one within the next decade.

This is why we are working on starting The Forge Coding Academy, a coding academy that is open to anyone with an interest in becoming an entry level software developer. We’re partnering with instructors and industry professionals with a vast background in software development to build a program that can train our workforce. One of our instructors currently works remotely with Apple and plans to start teaching classes on the side while we continue to set this program up.

The Forge’s mission is to train people to be entry level software developers from the basics to advanced techniques. This intensive program will be open to anyone with the drive to complete the program. It will require a fee to attend but we hope to provide scholarships to many of the attendees through our job placement partners.

Simply creating a coding academy isn’t enough.

We don’t want to train our local workforce and then require them to seek jobs outside of Appalachia. We need them to stay and gain their experience here. This is why FoundersForge is also creating The Forge DevShop. We will hire our graduates to work on government software contracts, Entrepreneurial minimal viable products, and local government needs. This endeavor will be lead by our Director, David Nelson. David has created and successfully led a software consulting company for almost 15 years. He has worked with the Department of Veteran’s Affairs on large scale scientific visualization and their work on veteran homelessness was even briefed to the Whitehouse staff in 2012.

By utilizing his leadership and experience, we can provide a highly competitive rates while providing real world experience to the graduates. As we continue to build products, we’ll also be able to provide services to the local Entrepreneurship community at very low rates to help launch startups in our region. And every dollar spent by companies, local government, and private corporations will go towards workforce development and Entrepreneurship activity in the region.

This is a large undertaking that we feel fits directly in-line with Appalachian Regional Commission’s strategic plan. We are currently working on Entrepreneurship development while we continue to build partnerships, fundraise, and connect with our region’s greatest assets: our people. We need your help to operate more effectively as a 501(c)3 non-profit and we look forward to learning from this program.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 0/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 0/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $94,000/$80,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $0 / $0

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $94,000 / $80,000

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Our organization launched as a 501(c)3 organization with incredible community support. We were in the middle of fundraising with private companies, our local healthcare organizations, colleges, and our cities. We were on track to launch without having to seek out grants. However, all of our funding opportunities were initially put on hold across the board and we’ve had to reinvent our strategy from the ground up. However, we will now be receiving $94,000 by the end of November from the City of Johnson City and some local partner organizations.

COVID has also created an unexpected change for our organization. The need for workforce development, job training, and Entrepreneurial activity is greater than it has been in a long time. Our founding team experienced the challenges and opportunities of the 2008 financial crisis, and we understand that if we act today, we can change the future for our region. We have greatly accelerated our funding goals to support our future programming plans to launch The Forge, and provide the training our region needs.

Yes, everything is very difficult right now for most of Appalachia. However, we also have a massive opportunity to accelerate our region’s future. In 2008-2012, some of the greatest known startups were born (Uber/Lyft, Stripe, AirB&B, etc). If we make an impact in our region today, we’ll have an entirely new tomorrow for our communities. The next great Startup can, and should, come from Appalachia. And we’re ready to be the catalyst behind the scenes to make it happen.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
We are afraid our funding issues will prevent us from being able to hire the talent we’ve been recruiting
We are afraid we will miss this opportunity to make an impact on our community
We are worried that our Entrepreneurial ways will create issues in the non-profit operations if we don’t truly understand them

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

We believe this program will help us in four critical areas:

  1. Our organization has been built by Entrepreneurs. While this is an extreme asset, it can also be a detriment to a non-profit’s operations. We want to ensure our operations are organized and run appropriately while we “move fast”
  2. We want to make sure our financial plan is in place to make the most of the initial $94,000 that we are receiving and to have our future plans set for the future funds we are seeking
  3. We want to have a better understanding of fundraising as a non-profit and what our limitations/expectations should be. We have learned that this is a very different world than raising venture capital.
  4. We’re looking for support, feedback, and analysis on our plans to become a self-sustaining organization. Constantly looking for the next grant or funding to keep the lights on is not a successful strategy for any entity to pursue. We have plans to become fully self-sustaining with in 3 years through the work that The Forge DevShop can provide.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: David Nelson, Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

Back to List of Applicants

APPLICANT

Pennsylvania Downtown Center, Inc.

Total Qualifying Score: 8
County (ARC Region): No
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: Yes – 0
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Pennsylvania Downtown Center, Inc.
Harrisburg, Other County, Pennsylvania 17102
717-413-4630
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Other
State (ARC Region) Pennsylvania


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The mission of Pennsylvania Downtown Center (PDC) is to build and support the capacity of local non-profit organizations, municipalities and individuals to enhance the overall well-being and sustainability of Pennsylvania’s “core” communities. PDC accomplishes this mission by engaging local community leaders and volunteers, and educating them, to advance the sense of place, quality of life and economic vitality of the Commonwealth’s downtowns, traditional neighborhood business districts and nearby residential areas.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

PDC works with community development organizations throughout PA who work directly with their local businesses to build entrepreneurial ecosystems.

Many of the local community development organizations we support and work with partner with their local healthcare systems to provide local food, wellness opportunities and education so they can attain their community health needs assessment goals.

PDC supports various initiatives such as the time-tested Main Street Approach for downtown business district revitalization, the PA-specific Elm Street Approach for neighborhood revitalization, and our own developed Nature-Based Placemaking concept in communities that utilize local natural assets and the activities linked to those assets for visitors and residents in their business development and recruitment strategies.

Many of these above initiatives engage local youth to volunteer and provide hands-on leadership development opportunities in their communities.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: Yes

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 6/2 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 6/2 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $646,954/$656,306

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $693,941 / $716,660

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $646,954 / $656,306

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($0)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($82,300)
Received From: PNC Bank   Date Received: 05/04/2020
For What Purpose(s): payroll, benefits, rent, utilities, etc.

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

We have had to pivot our hands-on, in the community trainings to virtual, which have cut down on travel expenses , but have increased our virtual communications about three-fold.  We have attempted to be immediately responsive to the changing needs of our community organizations which has created a higher demand for newly created services and educational modules in response to COVID.

We have also had to pause a number of our fee for service contracts until the communities are comfortable to meet in person again, which has delayed payment for those contracts, as well as the time that we allotted.  Also, much of our funding is tied to the state budget which can be volatile at a time like this.

We had to postpone our annual statewide conference to June 2021.  This deferred face to face opportunity to network and reconnect with our community members, business members, vendors, advertisers, sponsors, and conference participants has left a void for our staff that has resulted in a lack of conference revenue, and an increase in lapsed memberships.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
As the new Executive Director since July 2019, I have had to spend an inordinate amount of extra time on trying to maintain our existing funding sources,all while figuring out if we need to let go of any staff.
Balancing neccessary revenue from contracts and grants that require more work, with enough staff, but not too much staff.
Being too dependent on the state contract/grant that is not guaranteed.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

We struggle with being too dependent on a single source of funding, so we either need to increase our membership exponentially or ideally, find funding sources that could help to create ongoing sustainability, such as an endowment. I believe this program will help us identify where we may be able decrease expenses, as well as help us increase diversified revenue.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 B: 5-Week Course (Mar. 1, 2021-April 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Julie Fitzpatrick, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Potomac Highlands Food and Farm Inititative

Total Qualifying Score: 6
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : No (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $100,000 to $250,000 – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Potomac Highlands Food and Farm Inititative
Davis, Tucker County, West Virginia 26260
304-259-5388
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Tucker
State (ARC Region) West Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

PHFFI is a non-profit organization with the mission to increase access to quality food and farm products, assist small farmers and producers in building their agricultural businesses while supporting healthy eating and lifestyles.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

PHFFI supports entrepreneurs in the agriculture sector.  We connect these entrepreneurs with training opportunities,  resources and market opportunities  that enable them to increase their wealth, while providing healthy foods to WV residents.  We partner with local health providers to encourage healthy eating, provide education on preferred diets for fighting diabetes and obesity.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 0/4 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/2 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $138,921/$116,007

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $198,459 / $165,724

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $138,921 / $116,007

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($52,226)
Received From: SBA EIDL and PPP   Date Received: May 6,
For What Purpose(s): Payroll

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

We have a small store that closed to the public during due to Covid 19.  We are trying to transition to online ordering and curbside pick-up, but our revenues are down 30% from last year and labor has increased as a percentage of sales due to the labor intensive nature of curbside pick-up and phone/email ordering.  We receive and package orders for each customer individually and meet them at the door with their orders.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Payroll
Employee and Customer Safety
Customer Experience

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Having a good grasp on ways to increase sales and reduce costs will enable us to provide the best customer and producer experience while keeping our quality employees working.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Short-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Marti Neustadt, Treasuer

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Youth Farm Project

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Youth Farm Project
Ithaca, Tompkins County, New York 14850
607-342-7632
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Tompkins
State (ARC Region) New York


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Our mission is to empower youth from diverse social and economic backgrounds as integral participants in building equitable local food communities. 

YFP is dedicated to healing our food system through an anti-racist organizing lens by bringing together youth from diverse backgrounds to explore environmental and social injustice within the food system. 

We believe that through critical thinking and openly learning about these issues, we can begin the healing of our food system, the earth, and ourselves. By developing leadership and communication skills with young people and having them participate in all aspects of food production and farming – from planting to harvesting and distributing, we can increase our unity and hope for positive change in our community and beyond. 

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

The Youth Farm Project’s Teen Summer Program is a hands-on job training program that provides teens with entry level skills in farming and all aspects of food production, including planting, maintenance, harvesting and marketing, as well as basic food prep skills.

All of our programs with young people work to increase communication skills, literacy and critical thinking about our food system and how each of us interacts with it, from a personal to cultural to socio-economically.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/4 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/3 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $277,078/$278,841

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $250,368 / $241,572

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $277,078 / $278,841

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($97,542)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($22,000)
Received From: Center For Transformative Action/ Tompkins Trust Company   Date Received: 7/05/20
For What Purpose(s): PPP – payroll program

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

We have had to greatly reduce programming, due to not being able to hold in person field trips and classes on the farm, and not being able to go into schools to provide fresh fruit and vegetable snacks and hands-ons healthy cooking and eating skills classes.  This has effected our ability to carry out our mission which includes reaching young people from an early age consistently over time to solidly build on skills. Covid has also limited the community access aspects of our program, meaning that families have less access to learning about growing and harvesting food, and actual access to food.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Taking care of staff.
Securing funding to sustain us through this time, so that we may be able to exist after the pandemic is behind us.
Meeting community needs for basic survival – specifically hunger – while also building systems that are sustainable for a new future.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

We have not had a solid fundraising plan over the years, and being somewhat fluid in that has worked for us so far. Going forward, as the economy is turned upside down in unprecedented ways, I am aware that in order to be solidly responsible to our staff and to the young people and families who count on our education, experiences and actual food, we need to pull ourselves up by our bootstraps and create a strategic and forward thinking plan for funding. Without that, all of the assessment of community needs and re-structuring of our essential programming is meaningless, as we will not have the means to carry out the work.

I am also interested in the aspects of this training that address mission and sustainability, as times are quickly changing, in ways that we are not and will not be able to predict. As our organization addresses what resiliency looks like in real practice, as an organization, as a community, and for the environment any framework that guides us in that conversation and analysis appears as helpful. However, again, without the funding to support the work, we are stopped.

For this reason, I see this training as crucial to our sustainability and the possibility that we will be here in the future.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? Yes

List of Organizations in Proposed Cohort:
Ithaca Waldorf School
Traditional Center for Indigenous Knowledge and Healing
Khuba International

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Katie Church Church, Project Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

The David School

Total Qualifying Score: 6
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $100,000 to $250,000 – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: No


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

The David School
David, Floyd County, Kentucky 41616
606-886-8374
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Floyd
State (ARC Region) Kentucky


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Our mission is to provide a comprehensive educational program for Appalachian youth who have limited financial resources and the potential to succeed in a nontraditional setting. We will achieve our mission by creating a nurturing school environment that offers all students, through individualized attention, the opportunity to experience success and to serve their community.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Our school helps educate disadvantaged Appalachian youth in eastern Kentucky. Our students are primarily students that have dropped out of public school or at risk of dropping out. We provide the opportunity for each student to succeed in a nontraditional setting, through individualized attention. We feel that we are making a direct investment in Appalachia’s economy by educating these kids and preparing them to be productive members of society.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 8/0 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 8/0 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $-75,715.53/$212,712.00

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $-75,715.53 / $277,040.63

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $-75,715.53 / $212,712.00

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($12,400)
Received From: SBA Payroll Protection Plan   Date Received: May 2020
For What Purpose(s): To secure pay for two administrative/staff members.

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

COVID-19 caused us to shut down all in-person learning after March 13,2020. We were unable to enroll students in dual credit courses at our community college and had to lay our entire teaching staff off. This caused an incredible burden on the remaining two staff members.  We reopened our facility in September, but the costs of cleaning supplies and hand sanitizer put us in a financial burden.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Securing funds for day to day operations.
One of our staff members or students getting sick.
Shutting down our facility for in-person learning.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

As a new Dean of Students at a nonprofit high school, I feel this is a great opportunity to learn about long term financial management and fundraising. We fund our school entirely through grants and donations.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? Yes

List of Organizations in Proposed Cohort:
New Opportunity School for Women
Cowen Community Center
Cumberland Valley Domestic Violence Center

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? No

Why?

The David School does not have an executive director.

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Jessica Thompson Thompson, Dean of Students

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Khuba International

Total Qualifying Score: 5
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : No (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $3 million or below $100,000 – 0 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: No – 1
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Khuba International
Ithaca, Tompkins County, New York 14850
707-570-5178
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Tompkins
State (ARC Region) New York


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Khuba International is a non-profit organization that seeks to build equitable and sustainable food systems by educating future farmer scholars and building shared land governance models. The organization accomplishes these goals through providing hands-on programming that integrates youth education, sustainable agriculture, and community development, and by fostering inclusive partnerships and land access pathways. Activities particularly seek to engage and empower community members impacted by racism, redlining, and colonization, and families from disadvantaged backgrounds. Areas of focus include: land access, food sovereignty, literacy, and sustainable agriculture outreach.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Khuba International’s mission and programming aligns with Appalachian Regional Commission’s goal 2, 4, and 5. Khuba’s programming seeks to provide education and teach skills around sustainable agriculture, healthy and culturally-relevant foods, and cooperative farming practices. This contributes to food security, community health and nutrition, and builds skills and knowledge for community members to grow their own food, and, should they be interested, engage in cooperative agricultural business ventures and/or homesteading. This is done by leveraging both natural resources of land donated by local farmers and landowners, and also by leveraging cultural heritage of African diaspora, immigrant, and indigenous farming knowledge and practices. Finally, programs build capacity of youth and families to become leaders in the community around food systems through trainings, workshops, and most importantly, relationship building activities with other community members, farmers, and community organizations.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/4 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/1 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $$85,900.00/$$100,249.67

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $40,439.39 / $40,646.28

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $$85,900.00 / $$100,249.67

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): No ($)
Received From:   Date Received:
For What Purpose(s):

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

COVID-19 has diminished our AirBnB rentals on the farm property, a significant source of revenue for the organization. Furthermore, our summer program could only run virtually, with select farm visits one family at a time, and our participation was diminished by 3/4.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Funding a full time employee to coordinate Quarter Acre for the People, manage volunteers, and other programs
Funding for capital projects of infrastructure development (ie hoop-houses, value-added processing equipment, etc)
Non-profit financial management, particularly in scaling up financially and ensuring sustainability during growth

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

As a small non-profit engaging in a growth phase with emerging programs, participation in this program will allow Khuba International to build our capacity to garner more funds and manage our finances more effectively. This will ensure effective growth and program sustainability. Receiving support and guidance in creating a Development Plan, as we would be able to do in the Fundraising course, will contribute to making sure we are on the right path in financing our programs. If we are able to take the Long-term Financial Management Course, the outcome will be similar, but with increased knowledge of management tools for long-term development and sustainability.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? Yes

List of Organizations in Proposed Cohort:
Ithaca Waldorf School
Traditional Center for Indigenous Knowledge and Healing
Youth Farm Project

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Christa Nuñez, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

Back to List of Applicants

APPLICANT

Meals on Wheels-Anderson

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Meals on Wheels-Anderson
Anderson, Anderson County, South Carolina 29622
864-225-6800
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Anderson
State (ARC Region) South Carolina


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The mission of Meals on Wheels-Anderson is to deliver meals to the disabled or elderly homebound in Anderson County.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Meals on Wheels-Anderson board of directors are exploring the Social Enterprise aspect in order to build support of our efforts to continue serving the ever growing population of seniors in our area.  Therefore, the strategic plan goal # 1 will help Meals on Wheels set a structure in place to ensure success.

Meals on Wheels-Anderson has adopted the national Meals on Wheels America motto of “we are more than meals”.  Therefore, we recently dedicated a full-time employee to ensuring that needs besides meals are being met for our recipients.  This aligns with strategic goal # 2 in order to ensure that the overall health of our recipients is being addressed.

Beginning July 2019, Meals on Wheels Anderson was awarded the ACOG contract for senior services.  This has allowed us to not only offer home delivered meal services, but has given us the capability of ensuring seniors are transported to senior centers as well as medical appointments.  It is our goal to work with other organizations to ensure transportation is not a deterrent to the overall health of the seniors we are serving.

 

 

 

 

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 6/9 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 6/8 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $1,325,660/$1,297,705

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $1,684,240 / $1,185,224

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $1,325,660 / $1,297,705

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($349355.67)
Received From: Appalachian Council of Governments   Date Received: We received funds over the last several months for units served
For What Purpose(s): deliver home delivered meals to those requesting service during pandemic and to support seniors not able to attend congregate dining sites during pandemic

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Our organization has continued to operate to serve seniors.  We have purchased extra shelf stable meals and have increased the number we are serving.  Financially, this has affected our expenses, although the local community has been very supportive to help us continue.  We have also shifted our delivery service to some hot delivery days as well as taking a frozen to supply the seniors for days we cannot serve.  Many of our older volunteers have opted to stay home during COVID, therefore, we have less volunteers. This has resulted in our delivery service going from Monday-Friday hot meals to a Monday, Wednesday, Friday hot, with frozen meals taken for Tuesday, Thursday and weekends.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Ensuring safe delivery service for both the volunteers and recipients
Ensuring funds are available to serve all that need our service
How to adjust to the ever growing population of seniors

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

I am interested in learning everything I can to ensure the success of Meals on Wheels long-term.   I am especially interested in learning more about using the financial data we have from our past year’s history to predict/budget for the upcoming year, understanding how to pinpoint the number to successfully serve all while maintaining budget parameters.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Long-term Financial Management

Course #2 Choice: 2-Mission & Operations

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Laurie Ashley Ashley, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

Back to List of Applicants

APPLICANT

Upstate Circle of Friends

Total Qualifying Score: 7
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity:
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Upstate Circle of Friends
Greenville, Geenville County, South Carolina 29605
864-277-5788
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Geenville
State (ARC Region) South Carolina


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Upstate Circle of Friends expands opportunities, enhances the Quality of life, and
empowers citizens of surrounding communities through multiple educational, recreational,
and social programs.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Upstate Circle of Friends, for the past decade, worked with at-risk youth through various state programs, i.e. TASC (Teen After School Centers), JRT (Job Readiness Training) now renamed YES (Youth Empowerment Services) with a direct focus on building the skills of next-generation leaders while collaborating with Greenville County employers to prepare and present skill-building classes and offer hands-on paid internships.
In addition, since the devastating negative impact of COVID-19 on our low-income communities, Upstate Circle of Friends has built a collaboration with the Greenville Homeless Alliance and attempting to put together programming at the large 22 classrooms UCF Campus for the estimated 90 children living in one of the 8 motels surrounding (within 1 mile) Upstate Circle of Friends to provide guidance and support during virtual school days and a robust STEAM and Cultural based afterschool program. At the same time, offering the parents/guardians struggling to provide for their families with education, knowledge, skill-building, and job search assistance.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 5/2 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 5/1 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $1,112,050/$905,195

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $960,237.10 / $651,079.75

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $1,112,050 / $905,195

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($119,103)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($152,800)
Received From: Greenville County CARES ACT funds   Date Received: August 2020 )$142,800) and Sep 2020 ($10,000)
For What Purpose(s): To provide hot, nutritious meals for a minimum of 100 African American senior citizens severely impacted due to COVID-19 ($142,800) and $10,000 to reimburse expenses directly related to COVID-19 safety and cleaning.

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Upstate Circle of Friends was scheduled to begin the TASC and YES programming geared to workforce development in our at-risk youth. The TASC was put off for 4 months. The YES program was put off to this month (October) 2020. Collaborations for space to work with at-risk youth were put on hold except for one small summer program following all COVID-19 guidelines and continues now as a virtual assistance day program.

The UCF Food Program also took a big hit due to COVID-19. When schools and rec centers were closed in March, the 10 rec centers UCF provides hot, nutrition supper meals, assuring these children in need didn’t go to bed hungry, were closed. All state funding went to the schools to provide breakfast and lunch to children 18 and under within Greenville County. However, understanding the huge food insecurity our families faced in the Greenville County food deserts, UCF reached out to several private foundations and received the funding for a mid-April to mid-June (60 days) program where over 22,000 meals were provided following COVID-19 guidelines to the households based on the children we had served, taking one worry off these struggling families. This program ended and the summer feeding program began. However, instead of the usual 1,500 children, there was an average of just 300 receiving hot, nutritious meals. In August 2020, UCF received CARES ACT funds to feed 117 low-income African American senior citizens in food deserts daily. Funding is on hand to assure meals to these 117 senior citizens through December 31st. Still, as the pandemic continues, youth programs are either on hold or being put in place with limited numbers.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Assuring Daily Operational Funds are there.
Receiving the funding required to move forward with programs desperately needed within our community.
Assuring funding is there for campus maintenance, i.e. $75,000 needed now to replace a building roof.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Upstate Circle of Friends sees our participation in this program as beneficial in several ways.  First, we look forward to being introduced to the newest trends and updated data to blend with our strategic plan.  Second, with that updated plan our leadership and board will have a renewed focus to work toward.  Third, we will be accountable to show progress.  Our UCF leadership team has only so much time in the day and choices are made as to how we need to use our time.  While increasing support is vital to survival, it is at times the time needed isn’t prioritized as it should.  Having the support and guidance from the ARC team, it will keep our feet to the fire and assure we do the work needed to achieve our sustainability goals.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021: 10-Week Course (Jan. 25. 2021 – Apr. 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Deloris Pinson Pinson, Founder and CEO

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Garrett County Lighthouse, Inc.

Total Qualifying Score: 5
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $1.5 million up to $3 million – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Garrett County Lighthouse, Inc.
Oakland, Garrett County, Maryland 21550
301-334-9126
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Garrett
State (ARC Region) Maryland


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The mission of Garrett County Lighthouse, Inc. is to provide personalized psychiatric rehabilitation services to those with serious and persistent mental illness through empowerment and integration into community resources while advocating for clients’ personal growth through ethical practice.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Garrett County Lighthouse, Inc. aligns with the Appalachian Regional Commission’s five goals by improving the mental health of our community while at the same time collaborating with other community agencies to advance our community development.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 28/7 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 32/7 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $2167951.59/$1966867.30

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $1886875.16 / $1570902.94

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $2167951.59 / $1966867.30

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($130,000)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($34,575.14)
Received From: US Department of Health and Human Services   Date Received: 07/23/2020
For What Purpose(s): Provider Relief Fund Grant

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

Due to COVID-19 our organization had to close to on-site services for 4 months. During which time we still provided meals and off-site services to clients. This caused an increase in fuel expenses as well as packaging for meals. We also had to purchase additional disinfectants, germ shields, masks, gloves, isolation gowns, etc to ensure a safe return to on-site services.  We have also had to pay salaries for staff to quarantine until they received a negative COVID test.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Fundraising
long-term stability
short-term stability

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

With COVID-19 individuals are not as willing to support fundraisers. Our organization uses fundraising to support our client activities. We hope the program could help us address how to motivate individuals to give and help support or clients and our mission.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? Yes

List of Organizations in Proposed Cohort:
Archway Station
Resources for Independence

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Fundraising

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 B: 5-Week Course (Mar. 1, 2021-April 4, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Amy Fike Fike, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Mentoring Plus, Inc.

Total Qualifying Score: 6
County (ARC Region): No
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $100,000 to $250,000 – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Mentoring Plus, Inc.
Newport, Other County, Kentucky 41071
859-982-5895
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Other
State (ARC Region) Kentucky


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

The mission of Mentoring Plus is to empower disadvantaged youth and their families to fulfill their potential and to contribute to the well-being of the community by forming relationships based on mutual trust, compassion, and respect.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

Build the capacity and skills of current and next-generation leaders and organizations to innovate, collaborate, and advance community and economic development.

Appalachian families have slowly and steadily migrated to the urban setting for a plethora of circumstances. It can be a difficult transition for adults but can significantly impact the second generation adversely. Youth may demonstrate this impact through low school performance, substance abuse, or overall unstable mental health. Mentoring Plus is a program that reaches out to youth that may be struggling in these areas.

The focus is to expand our program guidelines by establishing a willingness with our volunteers to create a mindset of sharing a sense of purpose, values, and engagement rules.

We create a place at the table for all parts of the community, especially those that may look different or have not always been included in the conversation. Inclusion cannot happen on its own. It must be an intentional part of any economic or community development strategy.

We welcome discussions incorporated in our program about ideas on how to produce better community and economic development, merging different cultures and viewpoints, strengthening our youth’s ability to contribute to the community through teaching job skills, a responsibility to ourselves and our community.

The mentors or Life Coach is supportive of guiding the lessons taught into real-life situations by building a trusting relationship. It is an ongoing process to provide youth with guidance in work, school and, interpersonal relations for a productive, self-sufficient young adult.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 4/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 3/2 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $180,000/$235,000

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $237,601 / $247,208

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $180,000 / $235,000

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($34,555)
Received From: BB&T- PPP Loan   Date Received: 5/11/2020
For What Purpose(s): Salaries and rent

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

The pandemic has adversely impacted our interactions in the following way: initially unable to meet one on one with youth. Program night ceased from March until mid-July with limited attendance due to CDC guidelines. Due to no program, case managers increased food, clothes, and basic needs supplies to our youth and families. We had several of our youth needing food as well as utility assistance. It wasn’t easy to assess needs on a limited-access basis. Some of the challenges were: Increased youth requiring court appearances with case managers due to higher levels of anxiety and frustration—loss of much government funding due to limited in-person services. Also, reduced private donations.

Unfortunately, we had to cancel our major fundraiser this year, scheduled for March 13th, but we are looking for other funding sources to replace them. Our core demographic for our major fundraising event is donors aged 60 or older, which impacted potential attendance. The loss greatly affected our programming and required us to be creative in maintaining our youth’s services level. Initially, the fear of layoffs and severe reduction in programming lead to creative problem solving to see us beyond the end of the crisis. Our small staff (typically three full-time, two part-time) is under enormous strain; we are rapidly adapting to the situation while facing job losses and health risks in their own families. We continue to assist our youth and families despite the obstacles. We anticipated losing at least 50% of staff through layoffs or illness/exposure/isolation. We are clinging to the hope of continuing to serve the approximately 50 youth and their households (approximately 200 people).

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Funding
Staffing
Major Donors willing to contribute

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

We hope to address the need to have an actional development plan that we can use and follow.  Plus, helping us create a strategy for execution.  Plus, looking at the financial goals for the long term and not just surviving each year.  This epidemic impacted our survival, and we hope this training can provide long-term goals for sustainability.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 11-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 -Jan. 24, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Chris Saunders, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

The Highland Center

Total Qualifying Score: 9
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: No – 1
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

The Highland Center
Monterey, Highland County, Virginia 24465
540-448-1780
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Highland
State (ARC Region) Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

A catalyst for economic and cultural development.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

The Highland Center is a business incubation facility with coworking space to support new and existing businesses. The Center has invested in high speed fiber optic internet throughout its entire building to support tenants, visitors, virtual meetings, classes, workshops, etc. The Center has invested in video equipment for the conference room to support the virtual environment and is seeking additional funds to add additional video conferencing equipment to additional conference rooms. The Center’s Executive Director is a member of Highland County’s Economic Development Authority and works closely with County officials and business leaders to promote and support economic development in the county. The Center sponsor’s a SCORE program to support new and existing business’s.

The Center hosts and provides support to the County’s GED program.

The Center’s Executive Director is a professional engineer who works with the Town of Monterey and Highland County to support them in their engineering needs.

The Center hosts the area’s meal-on-wheels program in its certified commercial kitchen. The program delivers over 350 meals a week to area residents. The Center hosts and runs a weekly farmer’s market at the Center’s pavilion May -October promoting local foods and healthy eating.

The Center works with the County’s Chamber of Commerce promoting the area as a tourist destination as it relates to Highland’s heritage in maple sugar production, the Little Switzerland Cloggers, etc.

The Center sponsor’s and runs the County’s Youth Employment Program in cooperation with the Highland Public School system.

The Center sponsor’s and runs the County’s Youth Philanthropy Council in partnership with the Community Foundation of the Central Blue Ridge. The Center works with a group of the County’s high school age youth teaching about the importance of philanthropy and the program cumulates in the award of grants to area organizations. The grant funds are provided by the Community Foundation of the Central Blue Ridge.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: No

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 3/1 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 2/1 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $306,482/$310,556

Q6. Fiscal Year: Calendar

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $-122,567 / $319,961

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $306,482 / $310,556

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): No ($)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($172,300)
Received From: US Treasury – Small Business Administration   Date Received: EIDL advance: 21Apr2020; PPP: 4May2020; EIDL loan: 23Jun2020
For What Purpose(s): Payroll and general operating expenses.

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

The Center had to close its facility to the general public and only let people in on an as needed basis. 

The Center has two essential businesses, Highland Children’s House and Meals-on-Wheels, which occupies space in the lower level of the Center. Highland Children’s House is the county’s only licensed daycare facility which opened in August 2019. Meals-on-Wheels is critical to providing meals to area residents. Since both these organizations occupy space in the lower level of the Center and they are critical to support our community especially in the COVID situation, the Center has closed the lower level to all except Highland Children’s House, Meals-on-Wheels, and Center staff except in rare cases.

The Center has loss significant income due to the cancellation of the Maple Festival in March. Numerous activities which would have generated income had to be canceled.

Numerous events which would have generated income had to be cancelled due to the COVID situation.

 Fundraising has been down due to the economic situation created by the COVID situation.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Long term financial stability due to cancellation of events due to COVID.
How to support the community taking into account COVID operating requirements.
What actions will have to be taken if we have to close the facility due to a positive COVID case.

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

The fundraising course will provide guidance on how best to do fundraising especially in lite of the COVID situation.

The long term financial management course will hopefully outline how to prepare for long term financial stability and how to prepare for unforeseen circumstances that may arise.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? Yes

List of Organizations in Proposed Cohort:
Highland Children’s House

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Winter 2021 A: 5-Week Course (Jan. 25, 2021 – Feb. 28, 2021)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Henry Budzinski, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Chestnut Creek School of the Arts (CCSA)

Total Qualifying Score: 7
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: Yes – 0
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : No (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: $250,001 to $1.5 million – 5 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding:
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Chestnut Creek School of the Arts (CCSA)
Galax, Other County, Virginia 24333
276-236-3500
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Other
State (ARC Region) Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

We offer classes, events and exhibits year-round for all ages and skill levels in wood, pottery, painting, stained glass, fused glass, textiles and more.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

  1. We were formed as a vehicle to stimulate growth in the economy, developing a creative economy.  Revenue is generated for regional artists through both teaching and sales of their work and visitors are solicited for classes/sales and multiplier with regional lodging, shopping and dining.
  2. In addition to typical classes we’ve developed a wellness curriculum shortening time and welcoming seniors, special needs and vets to benefit from the creative process in both stress relief, community development and pride engaging several community service projects- healing by giving back.
  3. n/a
  4. This school has been just as much about community development as it has economic development leveraging the cultural heritage and human resources in teaching Appalachian craft that will otherwise be lost if we don’t continue embracing and sharing these skills, knowledge and experiences.
  5. We have several “graduates” from our classes, entrepreneurs their own studios/businesses now as a direct result of CCSA’s classes.  We also offer multiple programs to school aged students including but not limited to: STEM, after school, in-session, offering innumerable volunteer, internship involvement opportunities.

Q3. IRS Filing Status: 501(c)(3)   

Q4. Unit or Chapter of Larger Organization: Yes

Q5. Employees:

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/4 (as of 9/1/2020)

Full-Time/Part-Time Employees: 1/4 (as of 12/31/2019)

Current Year Income/Expenses: $195,672/$200,143

Q6. Fiscal Year: July-June

Q7. Budget Level

Last Fiscal Year Income/Expenses (Actual): $268,042 / $255,392

Current Year Income/Expenses (Projected): $195,672 / $200,143

Balance Sheet

Q8. Restricted Reserves (Amount): Yes ($$370,000)

Q9. CARES Act Funding (Amount): Yes ($$26,000)
Received From: Virginia Community Capital   Date Received: May 4, 2020
For What Purpose(s): Payroll and Utilities

Q10. Negative Impacts from COVID-19:

We have had to virtually shut-down our school.  With hands-on classes this pandemic has pretty much shut us down.

Q11. Top Three Concerns:
Being able to ever offer classes like we had pre-pandemic again?
Will our audience ever return?
With all but one staff remaining- will we lose all other staff and maintain existing?

How Participation in Program Will Address Concerns:

Information and resources are always of help.  Having an opportunity to network with other like minded organizations may/likely uncover  opportunities not otherwise evident.


COHORT INSTRUCTION

Q12. Applying as a Proposed Cohort? No

Q13. Executive Director or CEO Will Participate in the Program? Yes

Q14. Top Two Choices for Cohort Instruction:

Course #1 Choice: 1-Fundraising

Course #2 Choice: 2-Long-term Financial Management

Q15. Desired Course Schedule for Cohort Instruction:

#1 Desired Course Schedule: 1-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)

#2 Desired Course Schedule: 2-Fall 2020: 6-Week Course (Nov. 9, 2020 – Dec. 18, 2020)


APPLICATION SUBMITED BY:

Name: Christina Pollins, Executive Director

Application Approved by Organization Director or CEO? Yes, Approved by Executive Director/CEO

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APPLICANT

Youth Health Service, Inc.

Total Qualifying Score: 5
County (ARC Region): Yes
State (ARC Region): Yes
Q3. IRS Status: Nonprofit – 2
Q4. Parent Entity: No – 1
Q5. 2 or More Full-Time Employees : Yes (as of 12/31/2019)
Q7. Budget Level: Above $1.5 million up to $3 million – 2 (Last Fiscal Year Actual Income)
Q8. Restricted Reserves: Yes – 0
Q9. CARES Act Funding: Yes – 0
Q13. Participation by Executive: Yes


CONTACT & LOCATION INFORMATION

Youth Health Service, Inc.
Elkins, Randolph County, West Virginia 26241
304-636-9450
Email
www

County (ARC Region) Randolph
State (ARC Region) West Virginia


ORGANIZATIONAL & FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Q1. Mission:

Youth Health Service, Inc. will be the recognized leader and overwhelming choice for quality, comprehensive services that meet the needs of youth and their families.  Always mindful that children live in families and families in communities, we will build positive bonds between children, families, and communities.

Our services will be provided by valued employees who are recognized for their contributions.

Youth Health Service, Inc. will be proactive, financially sound, and technology smart.

We will strive to ensure that the services we deliver empower and support families.

Q2. How organization aligns with ARC’s Plan & Goals:

While Youth Health Service, Inc. operates three